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Finishing Edges


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#1 hidepounder

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Posted 23 July 2009 - 07:41 PM

Hello everybody,

I receive quite a few PM's and emails requesting information on edges, finger cutting, tooling patterns and various other topics. Questions regarding some of these topics come up on a fairly regular basis, so I thought I would put something together that members could easily refer to. This article describes the way I finish edges and Johanna has posted it in the "Tips & Tricks" section on the main page. I hope that some of you will find it helpful.

Finishing Edges



Bob

Edited by CitizenKate, 03 March 2011 - 05:45 PM.
Update document link.

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#2 King's X

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Posted 23 July 2009 - 08:32 PM

Finally, your own testament. The word according to Bob "Hidepounder" Parks! Bow to the master!



Bring on the rest of the chapters!
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#3 azrider

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Posted 23 July 2009 - 10:18 PM

All in one nice neat place. Now I only need to go to one thread to steal your methods...

Thanks for putting this together.
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www.drygulchleather.com

#4 CowboyDon

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Posted 24 July 2009 - 02:20 AM

Thank so much for sharing sir.
Thank you,


Cowboy Don @ Hard Life Leather
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#5 Vinkimus

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Posted 27 July 2009 - 10:40 AM

Thank you for the valuable guide, a craftsman sharing his knowledge is what keeps a craft moving forward!!!

#6 McJeep

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 09:59 AM

Wow - as a newbie t the whole deal I would've never guessed so many steps but it's obviously worth it as your work is absolutely flawless.

Thanks much for sharing - you've just saved guys like me years of trials and definitely errors ;0)
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#7 crissy

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Posted 02 August 2009 - 12:04 PM

Hello everybody,

I receive quite a few PM's and emails requesting information on edges, finger cutting, tooling patterns and various other topics. Questions regarding some of these topics come up on a fairly regular basis, so I thought I would put something together that members could easily refer to. This article describes the way I finish edges and Johanna has posted it in the "Tips & Tricks" section on the main page. I hope that some of you will find it helpful.

Bob


wow thank you for catapulting my edge finishing skills forward! I have followed your method with outstanding results, but I substitute seal oil soap for the glycerin soap and I used bees wax which leads me to this question.... what type of paraffin do you use to polish the edges? is it a wax or oil as I would like to try it and see the final outcome with this product.

thank you again for sharing your secrets.

cheers


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#8 hidepounder

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Posted 02 August 2009 - 01:54 PM

wow thank you for catapulting my edge finishing skills forward! I have followed your method with outstanding results, but I substitute seal oil soap for the glycerin soap and I used bees wax which leads me to this question.... what type of paraffin do you use to polish the edges? is it a wax or oil as I would like to try it and see the final outcome with this product.

thank you again for sharing your secrets.

cheers


Butchkitty,

I'm really glad you found my article helpful! I use parafin which comes in a brick. I think I bought it at the grocery store. The parafin is good over the bees was and adds a little polish. Bees wax doesn't polish that well. I have been experimenting with using bees wax after I dye the edges, and then using parafin on top of that, just like you're talking about, but to be honest I haven't seen where the addition of bees wax has added anything. It certainly can't hurt, that's for sure! I don't know anything about seal oil soap...what can you tell me about it?

Bob

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#9 TimKleffner

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Posted 02 August 2009 - 10:56 PM

Thanks Bob for the tutorial. It is great to see Craftsmen of your caliber sharing your knowledge with the next generation.
Thank you for walking me thru your process setting the silver centers.
Great to have you on board.
Tim

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#10 crissy

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 12:28 PM

well I did not have glycerin soap on hand but I did have soap made from seal oil so I tried it out figuring that the leather would respond well to the animal fat content and it dose! so thats how that came about for me. my edging had improved by ten fold with this combination I just need to try out the paraffin for that special glow your work embodies.


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#11 crissy

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Posted 11 August 2009 - 03:01 PM

hello hidepounder,

I have a question not really about edges but about dying, I was told by someone I buy leather from that when using fiebings oil dye that I should apply a coat of thinner to open the pours...? I was wondering if you had an opinion on this and or a method in which you also followed this procedure. I had been cruising the site looking for a topic on this but to no avail. I am so happy I have found this site and the people here are so honest and generous I look forward to your reply.

have a wonderful day
crissy


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#12 MHolzer

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Posted 11 August 2009 - 03:10 PM

Thanks so much for the brilliant tutorial!

However, I have a stupid question: Edging should be one of the last steps in the piece, right? After dying/staining the tooling but before the finish?

Edited by MHolzer, 11 August 2009 - 03:11 PM.

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#13 hidepounder

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Posted 11 August 2009 - 05:13 PM

hello hidepounder,

I have a question not really about edges but about dying, I was told by someone I buy leather from that when using fiebings oil dye that I should apply a coat of thinner to open the pours...? I was wondering if you had an opinion on this and or a method in which you also followed this procedure. I had been cruising the site looking for a topic on this but to no avail. I am so happy I have found this site and the people here are so honest and generous I look forward to your reply.

have a wonderful day
crissy


Hi Crissy,

The first question I would ask is what color dye are you using and where on the leather are you using it? Is it just a highlight or are you dyeing the entire piece?

I use the alcohol dyes rather than the oil dyes, mostly because that was what I learned on and am most comfortable with. Also, 90% of my dyeing is in the background of my tooling and I use very dark colors. I haven't found a need to do anything to the leather to accomodate this type of dye.

When I am ready to dye my backgrounds I clean the surface of the leather with oxalic acid. This removes any soiling picked up off the bench as well as oils from my hands that are left on the leather. I feel strongly that the this cleaning makes a difference when I begin applying my finishes such as antiques. So it holds for me that it will be beneficial when dyeing the leather with medium or light colored dyes as well. By cleaning the leather you are removing anything which may inhibit the penetration of the dye or affect the color. For the dark colors, I doubt you would notice any difference whether you are using oil dyes (which aren't really oil at all) or alcohol dyes. Using oxalic acid is just a good habit to get into to help keep everything as clean as possible. I can see where applying a coat of thinner may help increase the penetration of the oil dye. I have just never seen the point in using it on what I do because the alcohol dyes work so well. The alcohol dyes dry much faster than the oil dyes do, which I think is a positive side benefit.

I hope this answers you questions...
Bobby


Thanks so much for the brilliant tutorial!

However, I have a stupid question: Edging should be one of the last steps in the piece, right? After dying/staining the tooling but before the finish?


Hi Mholzer,

For me the answer to your question is yes, that's the best sequence. There are, however, times when I will edge and dye before I apply any antiques only becasue the sequence of assembly requires it. I was taught to edge and dye right after tooling, but I like to get some of the finishes out of the way first. It helps me create neat straight lines when dyeing the edges and also helps in keeping everything clean along the way. It's not critical, it just works a little to my advantage to do it this way.

Hope this helps....
Bobby

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#14 crissy

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Posted 11 August 2009 - 05:54 PM

the colors are the basic brown and black though I have the h2o dyes I don't like at all how they go on or I should say don't go on very well. as I cruised the Internet it seemed most had great success with the oil dyes so thats how they ended up in my first dye collection I am certain eventually I will tr the alcohol dye too. I thank you for the information and shall try your method. thank you again!

c


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#15 Buttons

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Posted 10 December 2009 - 12:36 AM

Incredible work!





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