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Swivel knife sharpening


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#1 dustin29

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Posted 02 August 2009 - 04:19 PM

I searched for a post on sharpening swivel knife blades but could not find one. I just bought a new Barry King swivel knife and it needs to be sharpened, but I do not know how to do it and I do not want to mess it up. Can someone please guide me through sharpening my new blades. Thank You!

#2 TwinOaks

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Posted 02 August 2009 - 04:39 PM

To sharpen a swivel knife, you'll need a jig of some sort to hold the blade at a consistent angle. Then it's just a matter of drawing the blade across the stone. Narrow angles cut deep, wider angles cut...well, wider. Keep this in mind for the thickness of leather you'll be carving. I'm sure you can make something as a jig, or Tandy (and I'm sure others) sell one.

Before you start whetting away your steel, have you thought of stropping it? It's the final step in the sharpening process, so you'll be doing it anyway. It's done to polish the blade. A bit of reading here, and you'll see folks saying "stop and strop", often, or as soon as the leather drags on the blade. You may just need to strop the blade well instead of stoning off any steel (unless you need to reprofile the angle of the edge).
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#3 Mike Craw

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Posted 02 August 2009 - 06:53 PM

Hey Dustin!

I agree with TwinOaks. I've never seen a new swivel knife blade from Barry that needed to be sharpened. They do need to be stropped, before use and frequently during use to keep them as smooth as possible. Once you've stropped it correctly, you will really feel the difference.

Mike
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#4 dustin29

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Posted 02 August 2009 - 08:46 PM

Hey Dustin!

I agree with TwinOaks. I've never seen a new swivel knife blade from Barry that needed to be sharpened. They do need to be stropped, before use and frequently during use to keep them as smooth as possible. Once you've stropped it correctly, you will really feel the difference.

Mike


I say new but Ive actually had it for about a month and I have been practing about everyday, and I do strop. It just seemed not to be cutting as good. Maybe I am not stropping good enough. My jewelers rouge flakes up when I rub it on my block.

#5 TimKleffner

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 10:16 AM

Dustin
I have multiple swivel knives and I contacted Chuck Smith several years ago and bought a blade sharpening jig from him. It's the best one I've owned and worth the price. I bought a high end black stone for sharpening and touch up every couple months.
STROP STROP STROP!

Happy tooling
Tim

Edited by TimKleffner, 03 August 2009 - 10:19 AM.

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#6 Mike Craw

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 10:24 AM

Hey Dustin!

I had a long conversation with Bob Beard about stropping, and one thing he mentioned was that many high quality blades like his (and I'd guess Henley's and Barry King's) are so hard that jewelers rouge really doesn't have any effect on them. He recommended some stuff called Fabulustre from Grobet, which I got online. He puts it on a piece of cardstock. He also recommended a long (18" or so) strop. He said that every time you go back to take another pass, you change the angle just a little bit. A longer strop lets you make fewer passes, and therefore, fewer angle changes.

Hope this helps.

Mike
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#7 dustin29

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 03:08 PM

Thanks for the info Tim, is this blade jig still available? And Thank you Mike I will definately check into purchasing some Fabulustre, I appreciate the help.

#8 hidepounder

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 08:14 PM

Dustin,

I don't think Chuck Smiths sharpening jig will help you because Barry's blades are flat shanked and not round shanked. (If that is incorrect will someone please jump in and update me?) Anyway, if you will go to Leather Wranglers site (listed on LW Main Page), I believe Paul has a tutorial on how to sharpen his blades which are flat shank also. He describes how to modify a Tandy sharpening jig (inexpensive) to accomodate flat shank blades.

Hope this helps...
Bob

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#9 TimKleffner

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 08:24 PM

Dustin
I looked up on the web and did not see Chuck Smith Tools web site. In the Shop Talk magazine, he's got an add. Chuck Smith Tools P O Box 2647 Valley Center CA 92082.
760.749.5755

I'd give them a call ... either Chuck or Lana [his wife] will help you out.

The Arkansas stone came from Hall Arkansas Stones 501.525.8595 I bought a black and a translucent stone and each does something different. They have a web site just google the name and give them a call their off on Monday's or Fridays. the owner was very helpful

Stropping is a practiced thing, pull back and lift straight up and take the blade back to the top and pull back again. I made a nice strop block from thin 2-3 leather and glued it to a piece of 3x6 inch plexiglass and keep it right next to the piece being cut and use it regularly.

Happy Tooling
Tim





Good point Bob, I didn't think about that... I don't own a Barry King knife or blade.

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#10 steveh

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 08:30 PM

Dustin,

I don't think Chuck Smiths sharpening jig will help you because Barry's blades are flat shanked and not round shanked. (If that is incorrect will someone please jump in and update me?) Anyway, if you will go to Leather Wranglers site (listed on LW Main Page), I believe Paul has a tutorial on how to sharpen his blades which are flat shank also. He describes how to modify a Tandy sharpening jig (inexpensive) to accomodate flat shank blades.

Hope this helps...
Bob



Bob,
I have a few Barry King Blades Purchased about 2 years ago, they have a round shaft and will work in the Smith sharpening system as I have used that on them. I think some of the BK early blades may have a flat shaft.
steve

#11 hidepounder

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 08:31 PM

I might be wrong Tim....I use Chucks guide and love it, but it wouldn't work with Pauls blade which is flat shanked, so I got a Tandy and modified it per Pauls instructions and now I'm back in business.

Bob

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#12 TimKleffner

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 09:40 PM

Bob, your probably right! I don't own a Leather Wrangler or BK swivel knife. I know that even the Chuck Smith jig won't work on my Lancer or Henley knives. I have to put a bit of tape on the shaft to shim both blades up in the Smith jig.
Good Point.


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#13 steveh

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 10:28 PM

Bob, your probably right! I don't own a Leather Wrangler or BK swivel knife. I know that even the Chuck Smith jig won't work on my Lancer or Henley knives. I have to put a bit of tape on the shaft to shim both blades up in the Smith jig.
Good Point.


Take a closer look at the Smith sharpening fixture, the round stock that holds the shaft of the blade, has two different diameters drilled into the opposte ends, on mine the smaller end fits henley blade , and does an excellent of sharpening the henley blade.

#14 hidepounder

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Posted 04 August 2009 - 12:57 AM

Thanks Steve, I appreciate knowing that! Somewhere I had it in my mind that Barry's blade shafts were flat. Maybe they were before he got his milling machines. SORRY BARRY! :dunno: I stand corrected!

Bobby

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#15 dustin29

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Posted 04 August 2009 - 06:20 AM

The Barry King blades that I purchased are round. I have a sharpening jig from Tandy but the hole the blade goes into is too small for the King blades, so I will be purchasing one from Chuck Smith. I appreciate the help guys, I did not want to try to sharpen the blades without a jig and end up messing up the edge.





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