Jump to content


Photo

Okay, how about a pattern for a dog muzzle?


  • Please log in to reply
34 replies to this topic

#1 VonFuct

VonFuct

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 39 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Costa Mesa, CA
  • Leatherwork Specialty:Wallets, belts, motorcycle seats...
  • Interested in learning about:All things leather
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?:Google search

Posted 12 August 2009 - 12:52 AM

Has anyone made a dog muzzle before? If so, do you have a pattern or some pics I could look at?

Thanks in advance!

#2 Trauma

Trauma

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 20 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Central Vic, Australia
  • Leatherwork Specialty:I'll let you know when I find out.
  • Interested in learning about:Colouring, carving and water hardening
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?:Google

Posted 12 August 2009 - 06:24 AM

What is the purpose of the muzzle?

There are several situations requiring muzzles, and they each need to be matched to the right muzzle.
Is this a commission job? Or personal?

If it's a commission job, find out more details and make sure you know exactly what you're making. Liability might be an issue here if the customer is ordering the wrong tool for their task.

If it's personal, talk to a dog trainer or behaviourist first and find out what type of muzzle you will need.
A professional will be able to tell you exactly what you need. (if they know you're a leather worker you might even get referals ;) )
"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new." - Albert Einstein

#3 UKRay

UKRay

    Leatherworker.net Regular

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,905 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Welsh border, UK
  • Interests:Looking, listening and learning
  • Leatherwork Specialty:none
  • Interested in learning about:Everything!
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?:search engine

Posted 12 August 2009 - 06:36 AM

If it's a commission job, find out more details and make sure you know exactly what you're making. Liability might be an issue here if the customer is ordering the wrong tool for their task.

If it's personal, talk to a dog trainer or behaviourist first and find out what type of muzzle you will need.
A professional will be able to tell you exactly what you need. (if they know you're a leather worker you might even get referals ;) )



This sounds like very good advice to me - I'd also suggest you take a walk to your local pet store and scope out what they have on sale... obvious, but worth saying. Then check out online photographs of dogs that are obliged to be muzzled in public places to get some idea what is already being made.

I make quite a bit of dog equipment and can't see this as a particularly lucrative sideline, but good luck anyway!

Ray
"Some mornings, it's just not worth chewing through the leather straps"

Ray Hatley
www.barefootleather.co.uk

#4 Spence

Spence

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 399 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Port Lavaca, TX, USA
  • Interests:Everything leather and GSDs
  • Leatherwork Specialty:Dog collars, etc.
  • Interested in learning about:Everything

Posted 12 August 2009 - 07:36 AM

You can't expect to keep the muzzle on the dog 24/7.

I'd recommend looking at various online suppliers to see what is available to thwart this behavior. I have used "Bitter Apple" (liquid spray) with great success in the past. I've also had just as much success with just watching the dog and stopping the chewing as it is about to start. I suspect it is a young dog and if so, it will grow out of it, but someone has to take control. A muzzle is not the answer.

On the other hand, if you want to look at muzzles, go here: http://www.rayallen....ategory/Muzzles

Also go here for a sizing chart (scroll down past the bite suit): http://www.rayallen....M_SizeChart.pdf

But, give the dog a break and train it.
Spence
Mendoza, TX, USA

#5 VonFuct

VonFuct

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 39 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Costa Mesa, CA
  • Leatherwork Specialty:Wallets, belts, motorcycle seats...
  • Interested in learning about:All things leather
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?:Google search

Posted 12 August 2009 - 12:56 PM

Thanks guys!

Trauma, it's a personal job, not a commissioned piece and the purpose of the muzzle is to keep my roommates dog, Duke, from chewing on everything in the house when he is left unsupervised (which isn't that often). He's a 6 month old pit bull and still chewing on everything from the carpet, the wood door jams, electronics cables and plugs, the furniture, etc. When he's supervised, he's fine for the most part. It's when he's left alone (with my dog, Bella, a 20lb 8 year old beagle) that he tends to chew and eat everything he can get his mouth on. He has nyla bones, kongs, and various other chew toys but he still chews on things he shouldn't be when he's alone.

UKRay, I did go to the pet store last night before posting this thread and all they had were flimsy cloth muzzles for smaller (weaker jawed) dogs. I talked with a couple there that had two pit bulls and they said their dog broke the muzzles they sold there in less than 30 seconds. I went online and looked as well but wasn't able to find any patterns for a leather training muzzle. Duke is not an aggressive dog at all, so the muzzle is not to control biting, just his chewing. And no, it's not to get in to the dog muzzle buisness, it's just to get one that fits correctly, is safe and works.

Spence, no, I don't expect to keep the muzzle on 24/7. More like an hour or two a day when the dog is left alone. I have looked at other options as well, such as Bitter Apple but I would have to dose my entire house with the stuff to make a difference. Yes, Duke is still a young dog and I'm sure he'll grow out of it, but I can't afford to have him eat everything in the house until he does. And yes, the dog is stopped from doing the negative behaviors when we are around to witness them, it's when he's alone that he get's in to trouble.

Thanks again guys for the replys!

#6 frontpost

frontpost

    Member

  • Contributing Member
  • PipPip
  • 45 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Martinsville, Indiana
  • Interested in learning about:SADDLES

Posted 12 August 2009 - 07:00 PM

Crate train the dog.
What a waste it is to lose one's mind. Or not to have a mind is being very wasteful. How true that is. :Dan Quayle



Tim See

http://www.quickstitchsaddlerepair.com

http://www.easyentrycart.com

#7 Timd

Timd

    Member

  • Contributing Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 680 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Levittown, PA
  • Leatherwork Specialty:no specialty, love it all(so far)

Posted 12 August 2009 - 07:07 PM

Crate train the dog.



Exactly what I was thinking

#8 CitizenKate

CitizenKate

    Database Diva

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2,563 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Kansas Flinthills
  • Leatherwork Specialty:Game boards, accessories, furniture

Posted 12 August 2009 - 10:43 PM

Exactly what I was thinking

Thirded. (If there is such a thing.)


Kate

#9 cybertracy

cybertracy

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 133 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Ojai, California
  • Interests:Just getting started so I'm fascinated with it all.
  • Leatherwork Specialty:learning through mistakes
  • Interested in learning about:construction & patternmaking
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?:surfing

Posted 12 August 2009 - 11:50 PM

I fouthed it, and not to get on a soapbox (don't even know what one looks like) but to make a muzzle heavy-duty enough to keep a Pitt Bull muzzled (somewhat short snouts for so much lower jaw, as well as all that extra jowlage and neck skin that was I believe is a trait bread into such dogs to, among other things, thwart their jaws from being held shut) it would almost have to be along the lines of Hannibal Lechter's device. Even with the easier breeds to muzzle, the muzzles are short-term, rather uncomfortable and distracting devices designed for veterinarian visits or other such events. A dog left alone trying like crazy to work a muzzle off his face can get into lots of trouble and perhaps hurt himself.

Crating or even dog-proofing a spot in the garage, laundry room, bathroom or some small area where he can be comfortable in for a few hours would probably be a better idea.

But. . . if anyone has a pattern that will fit my 62-year-old mother-in-law, I'd appreciate a holler.

Edited by cybertracy, 12 August 2009 - 11:52 PM.

wag more, bark less . . .


happy tails,
tracy

#10 CarvedOn

CarvedOn

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 145 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:NW of Phoenix, Arizona
  • Leatherwork Specialty:Original carving and tooling designs on leather items.
  • Interested in learning about:tooling techniques
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?:cruising the internet!

Posted 13 August 2009 - 11:48 AM

Ahh Haaa Haaaa! Mother-in-law muzzle! ROLF! Like to see that.

#11 VonFuct

VonFuct

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 39 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Costa Mesa, CA
  • Leatherwork Specialty:Wallets, belts, motorcycle seats...
  • Interested in learning about:All things leather
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?:Google search

Posted 13 August 2009 - 01:11 PM

thanks but no thanks. Maybe no one actually read the initial post or my replies, I didn't ask if I should kennel train him or what your thoughts on how to train a dog were. I simply asked if anyone had made a muzzle or had a pattern for one. It's not even my dog so I can't make the choice to kennel train him or not. And yes, I know about kennel training and suggested it to my roommate multiple times. And you people all make it out like muzzles are animal abuse and like I'm planning on leaving it on the dog for days at a time. No, it would simply be a training aid. whatever.

#12 Spence

Spence

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 399 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Port Lavaca, TX, USA
  • Interests:Everything leather and GSDs
  • Leatherwork Specialty:Dog collars, etc.
  • Interested in learning about:Everything

Posted 13 August 2009 - 04:55 PM

Get a new roommate.

You were asked why you needed a muzzle and you answered. That invited more comment. Here's another one....a muzzle should NEVER be left on an unsupervised dog for any length of time. Period.
Spence
Mendoza, TX, USA

#13 VonFuct

VonFuct

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 39 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Costa Mesa, CA
  • Leatherwork Specialty:Wallets, belts, motorcycle seats...
  • Interested in learning about:All things leather
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?:Google search

Posted 13 August 2009 - 05:52 PM

No, I didn't invite any comment or ask for anyones opinion (I have opinions too, but I keep them to myself unless asked) on the use of muzzles. Not that you people care but I'm about a day away from having my roommate get rid of the dog all together since he's not capible of dealing with him but I was TRYING to find another option since I know the dog is just not trained well enough yet. Thanks for making a new guy on your forum feel so welcome. To be honest, I joined this forum to learn more about leatherwork, not to hear random peoples opinion on dog training. If i wanted that, I would have joined a dog training forum.

#14 celticleather

celticleather

    Leatherworker

  • Contributing Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 662 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Hertfordshire, England
  • Leatherwork Specialty:Belts and bags
  • Interested in learning about:All aspects of leatherwork
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?:Through PSLAC

Posted 13 August 2009 - 07:01 PM

But. . . if anyone has a pattern that will fit my 62-year-old mother-in-law, I'd appreciate a holler.


These have been around since medieval times, called a scold's bridle! The tab on the inside held the tongue down and stopped it flapping!

Attached Files


When everyone is somebody, then no one's anybody

#15 CitizenKate

CitizenKate

    Database Diva

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2,563 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Kansas Flinthills
  • Leatherwork Specialty:Game boards, accessories, furniture

Posted 13 August 2009 - 07:06 PM

What is so difficult about putting him in a kennel, as compared to putting a muzzle on him when you have to leave him alone?


Kate





Similar Topics Collapse

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users