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putting a handle on a round knife


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#1 rawhide1

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Posted 16 October 2009 - 01:43 PM

I'm looking for a little help on putting a new handle on a rose round knife. My big question is what do you use for the ferrule. Do you make your own (from what)or buy them already made(from where). And any other pointers on drilling the handle or anything else ya can think of to make this project easier. All and any help is greatly appreciated.

Thanks, Mike

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#2 Art

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Posted 16 October 2009 - 03:05 PM

Hi Mike,

Copper water pipe makes great very rich looking ferrules, if you sand them they take a great polish. You can also get copper tubing, but not so easy to source, however one length will make ferrules for the rest of your life.

Art

I'm looking for a little help on putting a new handle on a rose round knife. My big question is what do you use for the ferrule. Do you make your own (from what)or buy them already made(from where). And any other pointers on drilling the handle or anything else ya can think of to make this project easier. All and any help is greatly appreciated.

Thanks, Mike

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#3 RWB

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Posted 16 October 2009 - 03:53 PM

I'm looking for a little help on putting a new handle on a rose round knife. My big question is what do you use for the ferrule. Do you make your own (from what)or buy them already made(from where). And any other pointers on drilling the handle or anything else ya can think of to make this project easier. All and any help is greatly appreciated.

Thanks, Mike

Attached File  IMG_0968.JPG   67.63KB   213 downloads



Mike,
Thats a really nice W. Rose blade. I have two in my shop that I use every day. I personally think that Rose knives have the best steel of all the antque blades out there. Personal opinion is all, I'm sure others would disagree, but no matter.
The easiest way I have found to put a new hand on is this: Cut a blank of hardwood close to the size that you want it to finish out at. Drill a hole in the top large enough to accomodate the entire tang of the blade. Then make sure its going to work, dry fit the knife and such. When it is were you want it, then go ahead and fill that hole with JB Weld. Not only is JB Weld a glue, but it also acts as a filler that is sandable. It will fill in the gaps thats are created by a round hole and a flat tang. (Hint if the tang doesn't fit right and that JB Weld sets up on you, you will have to cut the wood off of the tang. Just make darn sure its right before you glue it in.) When it's set, then all you have to do is sand or cut the handle to exact shape, polish it and it's ready to use. If you want a more finished look go ahead and wrap the top with either copper or brass and braze it together. But if you JB Weld it in there is really no reason to this other than provide a finshed look. That JB Weld will hold it to dooms day.
You can also shape the handle before you drill the hole, but it's tough to get the hole exactly centered. I have accidently drilled out the side of a handle before trying to do it that way. Tell me if that helps.
If you have the original handle you can also just JB Weld that back on. I've fixed numerous tools that way too.
Ross Brunk

Edited by RWB, 16 October 2009 - 03:55 PM.

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#4 kytim

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Posted 16 October 2009 - 07:06 PM

You can buy brass from just about any knife shop. If you don't have one near you google Smokey Mountain Knives. If that don't work let me know, I have one peice I bought from there.

#5 steveh

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Posted 16 October 2009 - 07:45 PM

I just repaired a loose handle on a rose knife, If you will notice on your tang there are several small barbs that were chiseled into the tang that helped hold the handle on. When drilling a new handle I would drill shorter than the length of the tang, and use a drill bit about the width of the blade about a 1/16 of inch. this will allow the barbs on the tang to dig into the wood and help hold the handle. On the handle I repaired I used a clear two part epoxy that I bought at nappa for 5 bucks, I just smeared it on the tang and slid the handle on and it was set in 5 min. The furrell on this rose knife is original and it is nothing more than a piece of brass tubing formed ablong to fit the handle.
steve

#6 rawhide1

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Posted 16 October 2009 - 08:00 PM

Hi Mike,

Copper water pipe makes great very rich looking ferrules, if you sand them they take a great polish. You can also get copper tubing, but not so easy to source, however one length will make ferrules for the rest of your life.

Art



Thanks ART

I just happen to have some copper laying around. So I reckon I'll give that a go.

Mike

#7 rawhide1

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Posted 16 October 2009 - 08:06 PM

Mike,
Thats a really nice W. Rose blade. I have two in my shop that I use every day. I personally think that Rose knives have the best steel of all the antque blades out there. Personal opinion is all, I'm sure others would disagree, but no matter.
The easiest way I have found to put a new hand on is this: Cut a blank of hardwood close to the size that you want it to finish out at. Drill a hole in the top large enough to accomodate the entire tang of the blade. Then make sure its going to work, dry fit the knife and such. When it is were you want it, then go ahead and fill that hole with JB Weld. Not only is JB Weld a glue, but it also acts as a filler that is sandable. It will fill in the gaps thats are created by a round hole and a flat tang. (Hint if the tang doesn't fit right and that JB Weld sets up on you, you will have to cut the wood off of the tang. Just make darn sure its right before you glue it in.) When it's set, then all you have to do is sand or cut the handle to exact shape, polish it and it's ready to use. If you want a more finished look go ahead and wrap the top with either copper or brass and braze it together. But if you JB Weld it in there is really no reason to this other than provide a finshed look. That JB Weld will hold it to dooms day.
You can also shape the handle before you drill the hole, but it's tough to get the hole exactly centered. I have accidently drilled out the side of a handle before trying to do it that way. Tell me if that helps.
If you have the original handle you can also just JB Weld that back on. I've fixed numerous tools that way too.
Ross Brunk



RWB
Thanks for the help I was wondering if I should shape before drilling. After reading your reply I think I'll drill first and then shape. The original handle was all cracked and busted. But seeing as I only paid 25 bucks for the knife I figured I could attempt to put a handle on it.
Mike

#8 rawhide1

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Posted 16 October 2009 - 08:09 PM

You can buy brass from just about any knife shop. If you don't have one near you google Smokey Mountain Knives. If that don't work let me know, I have one peice I bought from there.



kytim

Thanks for the info. and the kind offer it's much appreciated. I think I'll try that copper I have laying around. If I can't get that to work I may hollering at ya.

Mike

#9 rawhide1

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Posted 16 October 2009 - 08:18 PM

I just repaired a loose handle on a rose knife, If you will notice on your tang there are several small barbs that were chiseled into the tang that helped hold the handle on. When drilling a new handle I would drill shorter than the length of the tang, and use a drill bit about the width of the blade about a 1/16 of inch. this will allow the barbs on the tang to dig into the wood and help hold the handle. On the handle I repaired I used a clear two part epoxy that I bought at nappa for 5 bucks, I just smeared it on the tang and slid the handle on and it was set in 5 min. The furrell on this rose knife is original and it is nothing more than a piece of brass tubing formed ablong to fit the handle.
steve


Steveh

I did notice the barbs and was wondering if they drilled the hole small and short and then forced the tang into it. I didn't want to have to force the tang that much and run the chance of missing up the knife edge. I think I'll start with the 1/16"bit and move up if it's to tight. I figured either the jb weld or expoxy will hold her good. Thanks for the help I'll have to post a picture when I get er done.
Mike

#10 RWB

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Posted 16 October 2009 - 08:20 PM

RWB
Thanks for the help I was wondering if I should shape before drilling. After reading your reply I think I'll drill first and then shape. The original handle was all cracked and busted. But seeing as I only paid 25 bucks for the knife I figured I could attempt to put a handle on it.
Mike


$25.00?! Wow, that was a steal. I would like to see pictures of it when you get a new handle on it.
Ross
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#11 TTcustom

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Posted 16 October 2009 - 08:52 PM

Mike,
I have made a few knives and I use these suppliers for various parts.
Texas knifemaker supply
Jantz Supply
and Woodworker source for interesting woods.
These Rose blades went on kinda like a file handle goes on a file with the ferrule keeping everything together. Drill, dry fit, shape, inlay the ferrule and then use the two part epoxy (at your discretion ) should give you a strong handle. I use the two part and I have never had a handle come off.
Good luck. It sure is a nice find and such a bargain! Be sure to post a picture when your done I too am interested in seeing it finished.
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#12 rawhide1

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Posted 16 October 2009 - 11:09 PM

Mike,
I have made a few knives and I use these suppliers for various parts.
Texas knifemaker supply
Jantz Supply
and Woodworker source for interesting woods.
These Rose blades went on kinda like a file handle goes on a file with the ferrule keeping everything together. Drill, dry fit, shape, inlay the ferrule and then use the two part epoxy (at your discretion ) should give you a strong handle. I use the two part and I have never had a handle come off.
Good luck. It sure is a nice find and such a bargain! Be sure to post a picture when your done I too am interested in seeing it finished.



TTcustoms
Thanks for the links and advice. Now I hope I don't screw it up if I do ya probably wont see any pictures.LOL
Once again thanks I appreciate everyone taken the time to help me out.
Mike

#13 rawhide1

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Posted 18 October 2009 - 12:20 AM

Well I got the handle put on. I used oak because I had some and some copper tubing for the same reason. RWB even tho I drilled my holes before shaping I still managed to drill out the side. I didn't realize this until I started shaping the handle. I figure I can fill it with putty if it starts bothering me. The tang and ferrule fit so tight I didn't use any glue mainly because I didn't want to go to town and get any. So I drilled a hole through the handle and tang and pinned it. I'm pretty happy on how it turned out especially with the tools I used (cordless drill, belt sander, compound miter saw, and a palm sander) It's kinda of like me not as pretty as most but it will work.LOL I want to say a BIG THANK YOU to everyone for there advice on helping me get this done.
Mike

Attached File  IMG_0983.JPG   165.43KB   183 downloadsAttached File  IMG_0982.JPG   148.88KB   177 downloads

#14 tonyc1

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Posted 18 October 2009 - 01:21 AM

Well I got the handle put on. I used oak because I had some and some copper tubing for the same reason. RWB even tho I drilled my holes before shaping I still managed to drill out the side. I didn't realize this until I started shaping the handle. I figure I can fill it with putty if it starts bothering me. The tang and ferrule fit so tight I didn't use any glue mainly because I didn't want to go to town and get any. So I drilled a hole through the handle and tang and pinned it. I'm pretty happy on how it turned out especially with the tools I used (cordless drill, belt sander, compound miter saw, and a palm sander) It's kinda of like me not as pretty as most but it will work.LOL I want to say a BIG THANK YOU to everyone for there advice on helping me get this done.
Mike

Attached File  IMG_0983.JPG   165.43KB   183 downloadsAttached File  IMG_0982.JPG   148.88KB   177 downloads



I reckon that's a pretty good job!

Tony.

#15 RWB

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Posted 18 October 2009 - 08:09 AM

Well I got the handle put on. I used oak because I had some and some copper tubing for the same reason. RWB even tho I drilled my holes before shaping I still managed to drill out the side. I didn't realize this until I started shaping the handle. I figure I can fill it with putty if it starts bothering me. The tang and ferrule fit so tight I didn't use any glue mainly because I didn't want to go to town and get any. So I drilled a hole through the handle and tang and pinned it. I'm pretty happy on how it turned out especially with the tools I used (cordless drill, belt sander, compound miter saw, and a palm sander) It's kinda of like me not as pretty as most but it will work.LOL I want to say a BIG THANK YOU to everyone for there advice on helping me get this done.
Mike

Attached File  IMG_0983.JPG   165.43KB   183 downloadsAttached File  IMG_0982.JPG   148.88KB   177 downloads


Looks great, Mike. Pinning it was a great idea. If it works that way do it. Kinda like leather work if works, why do it some other way? As far as drilling out the side, things happen. That blade is still going to get murderously sharp and that is all that counts. Looks great!
Ross Brunk
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