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How To Make a Key FOB


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#1 Storm

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Posted 25 October 2009 - 05:42 PM

Instructions On How To Go About Making It. Some people have asked and so here are some instructions to help anyone needing same.
First cut out the fob carefully after tracing it to the leather.


Punch your hole for the concho

I will then die using and all in one from ecoflo. Front first and then the back in the center where there will be no glue.

I put the key ring on and attach the concho.

Then I fold over the two halves without gluing the and while holding them in place I mark both pieces, top and bottom on both s with a pencil. You are locating the upper most part of the gluing area.

Now open it up and on both sides draw a curved pencil line to each of the two points on both side. This curved line is the upper limit of you gluing.

I then burnish the inside between the two circles of the fob where the keyring goes.

Take the contact cement and carefully apply to both sides. Let it dry until tacky.

Once tacky carefully fold over the two sides and join them together slowly and as closely as possible.

Use a shoemakers hammer to tamp on the surrounding edges.

Of course it is very likely there will be variations and a little unevenness. This might happen even if you did have them die cut.

This is when I bring out my Dremel tools and use a drum sander attachment. Then by hand I get rid of the imperfection. The subtle sanding also has a way of prepping the edge for finishing.

I use a groover and then hand sew the two sides together.

The I use a bone folder on the water moistened edge and smooth it down.

I come back and use the all in one on the edge and let it dry.

The finally I finished the edge to a glossy finish.
Please keep in mind that unless I ask for anyones critique I do not want nor require same.

#2 Crystal

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Posted 26 October 2009 - 09:46 AM

Thanks for writing up the tutorial and for providing a pattern, Storm! I've pinned this so folks will be able to find it.

Crystal

#3 Storm

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Posted 28 October 2009 - 06:08 AM

Thanks for writing up the tutorial and for providing a pattern, Storm!I've pinned this so folks will be able to find it.

Crystal


Thanx Crystal....hope some will find it usefull. :rolleyes:


Storm


Please keep in mind that unless I ask for anyones critique I do not want nor require same.

#4 Spence

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Posted 28 October 2009 - 05:09 PM

That's great, Storm. Even I understand the tute.
Tks
Spence
Mendoza, TX, USA

#5 Storm

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Posted 28 October 2009 - 06:02 PM

That's great, Storm. Even I understand the tute.
Tks





Thanx Spence,
Perhaps on the next one I can include some photos. That can always help out the idea. I will say that the Dremel tool for the edges is great, especially if you do't have a lot of space to work with. Which is the case for me. LOL!


Storm


Please keep in mind that unless I ask for anyones critique I do not want nor require same.

#6 Spence

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Posted 28 October 2009 - 09:36 PM

I'm dying to use a Dremel tool. I've got 2 of them lying in a heap, at the foot of a far wall. The motors have died a slow death, even before I could use them on leather. I'm thinking about a "Roto-zip" tool. Anything but a Dremel (at this point).
Spence
Mendoza, TX, USA

#7 Corvus

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Posted 30 October 2009 - 05:04 PM

Thanks for this tutorial Storm, these key rings are very professional looking. Can I ask why you sew them - do you find it is necessary or is it just for looks? Also what do you use for marking out the stitching? I have been making key rings lately but not round ones so far!

#8 Storm

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Posted 30 October 2009 - 11:40 PM

Thanks for this tutorial Storm, these key rings are very professional looking.Can I ask why you sew them - do you find it is necessary or is it just for looks?Also what do you use for marking out the stitching?I have been making key rings lately but not round ones so far!


I sew them so that th two halvespf the key fob stay together! The ones from Tandy are like half of this one. They are not so solid and with the rivet might not last long. Sewing gives it a more solid and finished look. I have one in my pocket that I have used for several years. They just seem to stand up better. I don't do anything specia on the sewing just a saddle stitch. :rolleyes:
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#9 Ladybug

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Posted 06 November 2009 - 07:04 PM

Hey Storm

Thanks so much for the directions and pattern for you key fob. You posted it at just
the right time. I have been ask to have a small class in leather work at a local middle
school. I've been racking my pea brain for something the kids could make. The teacher
only wants me to bring knife sheaths and gun holsters to show and explain how to make
but i think that would be very boring for this age group. Something they can make and
take would be more impressive i believe. Any ideas on something else they might be
interested in making? I only have an hour class to fill.

Thanks
JoAnn/Ladybug

#10 Luke Hatley

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Posted 06 November 2009 - 07:27 PM

KEY RINGS AND WRIST BRACLETS WILL BE THE BEST ITEMS FOR THEM....OH HOW BOUT BOOK MARKS.
JUST A THOUGHT..
Luke

#11 Ladybug

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Posted 08 November 2009 - 12:39 AM

Thanks Luke

I may go for the wrist bands. i can have them finished pretty much ahead of time.

Hammers and a hard surface will be my biggest problem. So guess they will just
have to take turns.

JoAnn

#12 pilou

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Posted 08 November 2009 - 07:11 AM

Thank you.
It's very useful for a french beginner that I am.
I juts mad emy first item yesterday.
The next will be your keyholder.

#13 shehog

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Posted 19 December 2009 - 09:07 AM

Instructions On How To Go About Making It. Some people have asked and so here are some instructions to help anyone needing same.
First cut out the fob carefully after tracing it to the leather.


Punch your hole for the concho

I will then die using and all in one from ecoflo. Front first and then the back in the center where there will be no glue.

I put the key ring on and attach the concho.

Then I fold over the two halves without gluing the and while holding them in place I mark both pieces, top and bottom on both s with a pencil. You are locating the upper most part of the gluing area.

Now open it up and on both sides draw a curved pencil line to each of the two points on both side. This curved line is the upper limit of you gluing.

I then burnish the inside between the two circles of the fob where the keyring goes.

Take the contact cement and carefully apply to both sides. Let it dry until tacky.

Once tacky carefully fold over the two sides and join them together slowly and as closely as possible.

Use a shoemakers hammer to tamp on the surrounding edges.

Of course it is very likely there will be variations and a little unevenness. This might happen even if you did have them die cut.

This is when I bring out my Dremel tools and use a drum sander attachment. Then by hand I get rid of the imperfection. The subtle sanding also has a way of prepping the edge for finishing.

I use a groover and then hand sew the two sides together.

The I use a bone folder on the water moistened edge and smooth it down.

I come back and use the all in one on the edge and let it dry.

The finally I finished the edge to a glossy finish.



thank you so much for the tutorial, clear and concise. I am having trouble downloading the pattern though, is there somewhere else I may find this or can you email it to me?
Thanks in advance.

#14 DaCodaBuchan

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Posted 04 January 2010 - 04:06 PM

A great tutorial and one I will follow to the letter. Now to find more on finishing the edges.

What did you use when sewing them together? Would sewing thread be sturdy enough. Do I need something stronger?

#15 Storm

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Posted 05 January 2010 - 05:38 PM

A great tutorial and one I will follow to the letter. Now to find more on finishing the edges.

What did you use when sewing them together? Would sewing thread be sturdy enough. Do I need something stronger?


Glad you like the tutorial and the pattern. Basically I saddle stitch with waxed linen thread. There is also some waxed nylon thread. I have a key fob in my pocket that is several yeard old and still tight as a drum. Usining rivets usually means rusting. Most women may carry their keys in their purse but men carry in their pants pocket. My experience has generally shown that you own bodies perspiration can cause rusting, while waxed linen doesn't. Hope that this helps.


Storm


Please keep in mind that unless I ask for anyones critique I do not want nor require same.





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