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How To Get Rid Of Mold On Leather


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#1 JohnBarton

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 10:04 PM

Hi,

I promise I searched on this before asking.

Several of my hides have developed nasty cases of mold while sitting on the shelf. I don't know if was here but I did see some discussion on how to get rid of it. So I could use any help or direction to solutions if you all have them.

Thanks in advance from moldy John!
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#2 Storm

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Posted 14 March 2010 - 12:11 AM

Here are some ideas John,

Leather goods can also be protected by wiping them with a solution of 3/8 ounce (11 grams) of salicylanilide in 1 quart (0.95 liters) of rubbing alcohol. Dry the articles before putting them away.



To remove mildew from leather goods, wipe with a cloth moistened with diluted alcohol (1 cup denatured or rubbing alcohol to 1 cup water). Dry in a current of air. If mildew remains, wash with thick suds made from a mild soap or detergent, saddle soap, or a soap containing a germicide or fungicide. Then wipe with a damp cloth and dry in an airy place. Polish leather shoes and luggage with a good wax dressing.

Shoes contaminated with fungus growth on the inside often develop unpleasant odors, and colored mildew shows up on the inner sole and linings and up into the toe. You can remove this kind of mildew with low-pressure sprays especially intended for freshening shoes; these sprays are available at shoe and department stores. Use these products as directed.

Another way to stop mold growth in leather goods is to place the leather goods in a container along with crystals of commercially prepared paradichlorobenzene-paraformaldehyde. Close the container tightly and allow the chemicals to vaporize.

The vapors from these chemicals are effective in killing molds that have grown into leather, but they give no lasting protection against future contamination. As the vapors leak out, the chemicals must be replaced. Before using the shoes or luggage, air them thoroughly.





Hope this might help.

Storm


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#3 StevenSiegel

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Posted 31 August 2010 - 12:33 AM

Hi,

I promise I searched on this before asking.

Several of my hides have developed nasty cases of mold while sitting on the shelf. I don't know if was here but I did see some discussion on how to get rid of it. So I could use any help or direction to solutions if you all have them.

Thanks in advance from moldy John!


In regard to mold on hides... this is what I was taught... if it is MINOR, it can be cleaned & disinfected.... if not, get the leather out of your possession as quickly as possibe (get rid of it, it will ruin any ofher leather in the area).... it will spread to other leathers... the mold will eat the fibers to where there is no strength... it is more contagious than the flu in a classroom full of kindergarten children....

Regards,
Steve


PS How did you store the leather??? Is it vegetable or chrome??? How long has it been stored??? WHAT COLOR IS THE MOLD????

#4 CDragonworks

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Posted 31 August 2010 - 08:07 PM

I found that Lysol kills the mold on my saddles without causing damage...I spray it on and then wipe...then wash, dry and oil it. I have had great luck with this on my saddles and bridles which get really YUCKY here in S TX! If you have a saddle that is light coloured I would test it in a spot it will not show...all my tack is black or mahogany!Cat


Here are some ideas John,

Leather goods can also be protected by wiping them with a solution of 3/8 ounce (11 grams) of salicylanilide in 1 quart (0.95 liters) of rubbing alcohol. Dry the articles before putting them away.



To remove mildew from leather goods, wipe with a cloth moistened with diluted alcohol (1 cup denatured or rubbing alcohol to 1 cup water). Dry in a current of air. If mildew remains, wash with thick suds made from a mild soap or detergent, saddle soap, or a soap containing a germicide or fungicide. Then wipe with a damp cloth and dry in an airy place. Polish leather shoes and luggage with a good wax dressing.

Shoes contaminated with fungus growth on the inside often develop unpleasant odors, and colored mildew shows up on the inner sole and linings and up into the toe. You can remove this kind of mildew with low-pressure sprays especially intended for freshening shoes; these sprays are available at shoe and department stores. Use these products as directed.

Another way to stop mold growth in leather goods is to place the leather goods in a container along with crystals of commercially prepared paradichlorobenzene-paraformaldehyde. Close the container tightly and allow the chemicals to vaporize.

The vapors from these chemicals are effective in killing molds that have grown into leather, but they give no lasting protection against future contamination. As the vapors leak out, the chemicals must be replaced. Before using the shoes or luggage, air them thoroughly.





Hope this might help.

Storm




#5 Bob Blea

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Posted 01 September 2010 - 06:19 PM

Hello,

I've been told by a couple of professional leather workers that lemon juice will remove mold and some stains from cased veg tan leather. I've had a chance to try it with cased leather that picked up a stain from my fingers. I applied a light coating of lemon juice to the stain and it did fade after a bit. I assume it's the citric acid that is doing the work. I thnk the recommendation was just for small amounts of mold forming on cased leather. I don't know how it would work if there was a large area of mold or if the mold had deep penetration into the fibers of the leather.

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#6 dirtclod

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Posted 01 September 2010 - 07:48 PM

I gave a guy some leather had mold on it and he said he cleaned with bleach water. Personally i never have tried it but he said worked.
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#7 Peter Ellis

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Posted 02 September 2010 - 11:08 PM

John, there's a pretty simple, low cost and low risk method that's quite effective. Wipe the hides down with vinegar.
It's a highly effective fungicide.
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#8 King's X

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Posted 03 September 2010 - 11:39 AM

I was told to try Lemon juice and it works. Of course, I will freeze it after cleaning and drying it really well if it get semi bad........Really bad, I would follow Mr. Siegel's advise....pitch it!

As for Oxalic Acid, I know a professional tooler in North Texas that will use the O/A on every project after tooling and before oiling! I have never tried it, but his stuff is absolutely stunning.....up there with with Hidepounder and Peter Main, so something is being done right.

I happen to use Pro Carve in my case water and some water I have in a spray bottle. I have never had any issues with mold and some of my leather has sat casing in a plastic bag for up to 5 days. I thought for sure I was going to have to pitch it, but when I pulled it out.....clean? Again, something is working?

Good luck
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#9 MMArmoury

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 07:05 PM

I want to revive this thread for an important question. Someone gave me an old horse bridle; bit, head stall and reins to use as a display. While the head stall appears to be salvageable, the reins are heavily covered in fungus mold, I think the reins cannot be saved. Big question: While I handled this stuff for examination what are the health risks for exposure to this fungus mold? I plan using the above mentioned vinegar treatment for the head stall, which has a tiny bit of that fungus but is in much better condition, and I think I should dispose of the reins but I already handled them.

Edited by MMArmoury, 10 October 2011 - 07:21 PM.

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#10 wolfe9

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Posted 11 October 2011 - 06:42 PM

What color was the mold ? Unless it was something freaky or you have a preexisting respiratory problem or extreme allergies you should not see any ill-effects , most people only have problems with extended exposure and even with that usually black mold is what causes most serious issues . If you still have the piece you could get a mold test kit from any hardware store , most give you the option to send it to a lab and find out exactly what type of mold you are dealing with . Just make sure you wash your hands well (several min. ) and wash the clothing you were wearing separately (if you are concerned ) it has been my experience that bleach will not kill mold , you can find things online or at any GOOD hardware store that will kill mold , just read things carefully because many products are very misleading ..





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