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#16 lightningad

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 11:39 AM

FCP-X is just very different to any other video editing app. My own personal dislike of it is down to having tried it, and not liking it. Premiere is very similar to the older FCP, only it will run in 64bit.

As for Apples claim that its a pro application....they would claim that. But i don't know of anyone using it for professional broadcast work. That may change over time, but i'm sceptical in the short term.




I'm sure you could buy a big screen for a pc and get as large a resolution as the iMac. But don't let the screen resolution be your deciding factor. You need to keep in mind where the finished video is going to be seen. If you are putting them on a dvd or on Youtube, or broadcast tv, in fact, any place other than your own room, then the resolution of the screen you use to edit is completely irrelevant. The quality of the screen will have no bearing on the quality of the video you create. It'll just look nicer while you are working on it.

Great as the iMac is, its upgradeability is limited to what you can plug into its external ports.

I would imagine that for most tasks its perfectly acceptable but if you play a lot of games, then its probably not quite up to that level of graphics.

I know a pro photographer who swears by his 27"iMac.

I use various flavours of mac, including MacPro's and a MacbookPro - which i have edited tv commercials on whilst sitting in an airport lounge! I doubt i could have done that on a pc.

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#17 Sylvia

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 12:20 PM

Are MACS really imune to virius,malware? Lets hear it!! Thanks, Ross


NOPE they are not immune. Read more here. http://www.msnbc.msn...y/#.T1T0kPWMzxE

Many people buy Macs thinking that they are USA made... that's no longer true either.

PC emulators are available but I can't speak to how well they work.


Buy what you are comfortable with. There is a learning curve for PC users who switch to Mac so be prepared to spend some time getting used to the new machine.
A teacher pointed at me with a ruler and said "At the end of this ruler is an idiot." I got detention when I asked "Which end?"

#18 HellfireJack

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 01:00 AM

Hah I always love listening to the Mac/PC debate. It ALWAYS turns into a Mac vs Windows debate just like this one pretty much did.

First off. Windows is an operating system. Any discussion of hardware and Windows and you've left the scope of any real comparison. WIndow's doesn't make hardware. Discuss hardware between PC and Mac and you pretty much hit a stalemate. Each architecture has it's ups and downs. There is no real special bonus for owning a Mac. THe PPC chip is done for and the little mouse who could eat more than an elephant can is a goner. It's all elephants now.

Comparing just operating systems side by side and it's pretty quick to see why a Mac "just works". It doesn't do anything. The majority of people who purchase Macs own a 1400 dollar facebook machine as they sit and tell everyone how they "could" use it to edit video professionally while sipping a latte and playing Farmville at Starbucks. I've used pretty much every MS operating system since DOS 3, OS/2 Warp, every redhat distro since Apollo, countless Mandrake, Debian, Suse, FreeBSD, NetBSD and Ubuntu distros, I ran Solaris 8 on my main desktop for 3 months until I got tired of porting over software from Linux when I wanted to use a new piece of software Personally, I'm waiting for Android to finish it's OS. I can't wait to see what they do for PCs. Trust me when I tell you that operating systems are just collections of tools and as far as a Mac OS goes it's truly nothing special. I started using Macs pretty much right after the Lisa failed. It was a monochrome all in one monster that they practically gave away to schools. I've used Macs off and on since then. Windows beats it every time hands down.

You're absolutely crippled hardware wise when it comes to a Mac anyways and I'm not even talking about externals. Ask any sane person if they'd let their realtor tell them what furniture they can have in their house after they buy it and they'll look at you like you're a moron. Ask any car owner if they'll let their dealership tell them what aftermarket engine upgrades they can have in their car and they'll probably tell you to go jump in a lake because you're a nutter. Now ask a Macintosh owner if they're OK with Apple not allowing them to upgrade their computer as they see fit and they'll tell you that it's pretty much OK with them. They don't know anything about that stuff anyways. As long as it just works. That's WHY It just works. It has no ability to have it's core components upgraded or changed to anything other than Apple approved hardware. Every piece of software is written specifically for a known hardware list of miniscule proportions. It's like saying you'd rather have a 1200 dollar hammer over a 500 dollar nail gun because the hammer just works and you "could" use it to build a house professionally.... Yeah. No thanks.

All these people claiming they built PC's for years and then found peace in a Mac are at best wasting their money. You can build a Hackintosh now people. It's why Apple is suing the crap out of anyone that tries to produce one for mass market because once a machine that can run their OS out of the box hits the market any person still willing to pay 600-2000 dollars extra for brand loyalty and is quickly going to disappear because it'll just work on those cheaper machines too.

#19 Chavez

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 03:39 AM

I'll add my 2 cents.

I've been using Linux for almost 7 years and I must say that it's user friendliness has improved significantly. 7 years ago you had to be a geek to run any of the *nix but its not the case any more. My mrs migrated to kubuntu 2 years ago and she never shitches windows on unless she absolutely has to. She knows nothing about computers yet she has no problems using linux.

Macs are great...for people who don't want to know anything about their computers and are prepared to pay for this priviledge. I'd compare it to buying a car with a chauffeur, so you don't have to drive yourself. Only the chauffeur will tell you what car to get, where to go and what you should wear while you're being driven. I'm not saying its bad. If you are prepared to pay for this service and this service suits your needs and saves you valuable time - go for it. There's no need to read long manuals (Linux) or live with a crappy OS that doesn't work half of the time (that's windows).

If you have some spare time on your hands, try linux and see what the world is like if you don't use windows.



#20 lightningad

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 04:12 AM

for me, i'd rather spend my time learning and running the software i need to do my work, instead of mucking about trying to keep the OS happy.

I have never seen a piece of software yet that has made me wish i could run windows! Everything i need to create broadcast quality video, 3d animation, music and sound mixes are available on the mac and at the same price they are on the pc.

OK the mac costs a bit more, but for me its a work tool, not a hobby. I want to switch it on, work all day without problems, then repeat daily for several years. In the time i keep and run a mac, someone in the office here has usually gone through two or three pc's, and had endless hours of tech support . Initial outlay may be higher, but i reckon over its lifetime it works out cheaper.



Oh yeah, I don't buy a car with the intention of changing its engine - i buy the right one to start with!
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#21 HellfireJack

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 10:54 AM

You're implying that PCs don't last as long as Macs? Funny. Incorrect but funny non the less. Macs simply do not outlast PCs.

The PC I bought in 1998 for 250 dollars lasted me until 2007 when I forced myself to retire it as my main computer. I still used it as a media server for another 3 years until it finally got parted out and recycled. I used it everyday without fail during those 9 years with the exception of one bad memory stick which was replaced within hours. That means for 99.99999% of the time I just turned it on and it worked.

The work machine I'm using right now I've had for 6 and I paid 350 for it used. I'm sure there are thousands and thousands of people who have similar stories for their PCs. In my house I've had literally dozens of computers, both PC and Mac and I know for a fact they operate the same way and there isn't one that will outlast the other given the same care.

#22 lightningad

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 11:00 AM

not implying, just speaking of personal experience!

each to their own.
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#23 HellfireJack

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 01:01 PM

That's why It was a question. It's pretty much what thought I had read.

If you're not asking us to accept the conclusion that macs may cost more but they last longer and can therefor be cheaper in the long run then I guess I'm mistaken.

No big deal. It's not like we're fighting. :) I'm just giving you my personal experiences as well.


#24 mrdabeetle

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Posted 07 March 2012 - 10:38 AM

I still say that there is nothing you cant do on a Mac now that they can run both systems.
Josh

Off the shelf Mac system can't perform as well graphically as a pc. They aren't built for rendering 3d with advanced shaders in realtime. There are mac desktops that can, but prepare to spend a lot of money. As far as hardware is concerned, Mac has better quality components than a stock HP, Dell, etc., but an Asus, or other comparable brand will provide the same level of quality as a Mac.

Windows crashes are almost always related to user error. I have an old Compaq Presario 5000T (made in 2001) that is now used solely as an internet appliance. To date, it has never crashed, hung, or shown any signs of age. Just like your car, if you don't maintain your computer, it will fail. Windows has built in security features, but most users ignore them and they remain off for convenience.

If your browser looks like this, you need to back away from the computer and never touch it again.

Posted Image

Mac will never crash...
Posted Image...almost never.

Here's a little song to set your mind at ease about the OS war.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d85p7JZXNy8

#25 hummeri7582

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Posted 10 June 2012 - 11:36 PM

I switched six years ago. Funny story, actually. I interviewed for a job where computer use is a big part of it. For the previous ten years, I had been working with Windows. On my first day on the new job, they showed me to my desk where the IT guys had just installed a brand new, High-end workstation. It was a Mac. Through all of the interview process, they never mentioned that they were a Mac shop! So I went home and bought one online that night, along with a few books to teach me how to program with it.

I've been very happy with the switch.

Some observations:

1) They are terribly expensive. However, the one I bought six years ago is still running fine and is still usable. I've upgraded it as far as it will go. I never had a PC laptop that lasted as long and aged as gracefully. My opinion in that regard is that Macs are more money up front, but over the course of their use, the expense really is a wash.

2) The learning curve was pretty flat. WIthin a day or so, I was moving around and doing things just as well as I was on PC. For keyboard shortcuts, they're almost all the same, only substituting "Command" for "CTRL." e.g.: On a PC, Copy is CTRL+C, paste is CTRL+V. On a Mac, it's Command+C and Command+V respectively. I'd say that 90% of the keyboard commands are thusly similar.

3) They are not immune to viruses, at all. That said, I' have never had one on any of my machines, but that is not because they can't get them. Fact is, PCs get more viruses, Malware and other such things because more people are writing them for that platform. As Macs become a larger portion of the market share, expect people to begin writing viruses for them, too. IN fact, there was one a month or so ago.

4) I don't give mush credibility to the "PCs are more upgradable" thing. Macs use Intel processors, Nvidia and ATI video cards, etc. Same things as PCs. Most PCs you buy from computer stores have integrated video, sound, etc just like Macs, so they are no more upgradable than a Mac. Unless you're building your own computers from components (Which I used to do back in the day), it's somewhat of a moot issue. On my Macbook, I have upgraded memory, Hard drives, and processors myself all with generic stuff I bought from the computer store. On my Mac Pro (Apple's high end workstation) most of the components are modular, so they can be swapped out. With my Mac Pro, I've upgraded video cards, RAID Controllers, RAM and Processors. The Mac Pro is very, very upgradable. It's also Apple's most expensive computer.

5) Mac Software can crash. However, it's a lot less likely to bring the OS down with it. I've had some crappy software on the Mac that crashed a lot, but the OS remained stable. In six years of Mac use, I've had a Kernel Panic (the equivalent of the Blue Screen of Death) maybe twice or three times. I think I had that happen with Windows more often, but not so much that it is really worth mentioning.

6) I can run Windows either in a virtualization system (like Parallels) or I can boot the machine straight into Windows (Or linux, for that fact). I have used both virtualization and direct booting and it works flawlessly. One issue with virtualization is that it is resource intensive. You're basically running two OSes, plus your software on one machine simultaneously. If you're using Windows software that is processor intensive, you'll be happier direct booting into Windows.

Recently, I upgraded. I gave the old Macbook I bought six years ago to a family member going to college and bought myself a new MacBook Pro, Quad core Intel i7 processors, two video cards (one low power intel card on the board for everyday graphics, a second AMD/ATI Radeon for higher-end graphics) lots of RAM and Solid-state hard drive. I'm pretty much sold on Mac. I like it. But I can afford it. If I could not afford it, I would get a Windows machine and I'd probably be just as happy with it. In the end, it comes down to preferences, and how well you take care of it. Installing junky, crappily-written software on any computer will cause problems, no matter the OS.

This is my experience. For my wife, it's totally different -- Macs are the only choice. She's a genetic researcher, and most of the genetics software she uses is written for the Mac, or for Unix/Linux, and Mac OS X is UNIX at it's heart so it can run Unix software natively. As to why so much of the genetics software is Mac-centric, it's an accident of fate: the first guy at a university who thought of using personal computers for genetics work way back in the late 70s and early 80s programmed it for the computer he had -- an Apple II. In 1984, he upgraded to a Mac, and re-wrote his software for that. He was a pioneer in computer applications for genetics, and many of the people who learned to write that software learned it from him. Of course, they learned it on Mac, too. So, to this day, much of that software is written for Mac. Old habits die hard. PCs have made inroads in that sector, but that notwithstanding, she and most of her colleagues have Macs on their desks.





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