Jump to content


Photo

Broken Saddle Horn


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 charliep

charliep

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Davis, CA
  • Interests:All things western.
  • Leatherwork Specialty:Tack making and repair
  • Interested in learning about:rawhide and saddle repair
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?:google

Posted 04 May 2010 - 11:43 PM

I've got a saddle that's horn has come loose because a horse rolled over on it. The front two legs of the horn are completely dislodged from the tree and the back two are loose. I think the tree is cracked where the two front legs of the horn used to be attached, but I don't how the horn is supposed to fastened to the tree. Is the saddle going to be repairable or is the tree shot? I'd post some pictures but I don't have a camera at the moment.

#2 Steve Brewer

Steve Brewer

    Member

  • Contributing Member
  • PipPip
  • 354 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Leatherwork Specialty:Custom SaddleMaker

Posted 05 May 2010 - 09:49 AM

I've got a saddle that's horn has come loose because a horse rolled over on it. The front two legs of the horn are completely dislodged from the tree and the back two are loose. I think the tree is cracked where the two front legs of the horn used to be attached, but I don't how the horn is supposed to fastened to the tree. Is the saddle going to be repairable or is the tree shot? I'd post some pictures but I don't have a camera at the moment.


Is the saddle built on a rawhide covered tree?To replace a horn is a labor intensive job,you have to tear the saddle down.Drop the skirts off ,pull the seat back,take the fork cover off.Remove the horn cover,then you will see if the tree is broke.To replace the horn you will need to order a repair horn.I charge 450 dollars to do this repair.If the tree is broke you will need to replace the tree,a 1500 dollar repair.Do the math and see if the saddle is worth it.
Steve

#3 jonwatsabaugh

jonwatsabaugh

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 117 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Des Moines, Iowa
  • Leatherwork Specialty:tree/saddle maker

Posted 05 May 2010 - 02:00 PM

If the tree is rawhide covered, the hide can be stripped and all the pieces epoxied and pinned back together. After this opperation I epoxy/fiberglass the stucture and rawhide if desired. On tree repairs such as this it's easier to repair the old as opposed to getting a replacement tree to fit exactly as the original. Also it could be a poorly enough built tree to begin with, in such case a replacement would be neccesary. Wouldn't know though untill it's opened up. I've done this alot on saddles that were actually worth repairing. Like Steve mentioned though, whether replacing or repairing it's an expensive operation.

Jon

#4 charliep

charliep

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Davis, CA
  • Interests:All things western.
  • Leatherwork Specialty:Tack making and repair
  • Interested in learning about:rawhide and saddle repair
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?:google

Posted 08 May 2010 - 03:05 PM

Thank you for the help. However, I don't think this saddle is going to be worth putting the in the time and money to fix it.





Similar Topics Collapse

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users