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Recommendation for an Anvil


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#16 esantoro

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Posted 28 April 2008 - 05:01 PM

ED, i do have the harbor freight anvil, you have seen a 5# one on the bench before.
i like the heavy one( 55#) for setting copper rivets.
the square hole is called a "hardy hole", there are a lot of different items a Blacksmith
will make, too help him make these items he will use a "Hardy tool"
when i bought mine it was 29.99 0n sale....



Luke,

I've been looking around the net for hardy tools. Many seem to be about 1 inch wide. Is that about the width of the hardy hole in your 55# harbor freight anvil?



Ed

#17 Luke Hatley

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Posted 28 April 2008 - 06:23 PM

ED, yes the hole in mine is 1" square.
Luke

#18 esantoro

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Posted 28 April 2008 - 07:16 PM

i would just get a flat steel plate, this way when you have that large piece that's hard to hold, you can lay it on your bench and the rise of the plate is not enough to make holding the pieces awkard while setting the rivet.

Marlon


Hi Marlon,

I know exactly what you mean about positioning awkward pieces.

Ed

#19 anvilcustoms

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Posted 05 May 2008 - 08:42 AM

I never imagined I would start getting so into anvils.

How I wish I could afford both the space and the price for this one on ebay: item #200218172835

Ed


Be careful, anvils can be addicting!! I've been collecting anvils for 17 years now. I've bought and sold somewhere around 600 anvils or so.

A couple of years ago, I had the LARGEST Hay Budden anvil known in existence at 701 pounds. It came off the Missouri-Pacific Railroad.

I just purchased a 255 pound Arm & Hammer anvil.....best anvil ever manufactured.

That Fisher Horseshoe anvil that you mention was a GREAT BUY! I would have bid on it if I had remembered to. Probably worth closer to $1500 or so. The HORSESHOE emblem on the side is extremely RARE on a FIsher anvil.

Anyways, check out some of my MINI anvils that I make right here in my shop.....

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http://i263.photobuc...ms/DSC00113.jpg
Cheers,

Ryan Wasson
Anvil Customs

www.anvilcustoms.com

#20 bcurrier

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Posted 05 May 2008 - 10:23 AM

Now those are some cool little anvils! Do you sell them? If so, how much? :head_hurts_kr:

Bill

#21 anvilcustoms

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Posted 05 May 2008 - 09:55 PM

Now those are some cool little anvils! Do you sell them? If so, how much? :head_hurts_kr:

Bill


THANKS!!

They range from $99 to $199....each. I've been making these for 8 years now. Probably a little over 400 made/sold.
Cheers,

Ryan Wasson
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#22 RichardCollmorgen

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Posted 07 May 2008 - 07:33 AM

I got a disc of steel about 1 inch thick and 12 inches in diameter from a local steel fabrication shop. They had several that were cut offs. They only charged a couple of dollars, although steel prices have really jumped up recently. I sanded the top very smooth and eased the edges and coated it with some neatsfoot oil. Works great. Like somebody else said, the low height makes it easy to hold work pieces in place.

#23 esantoro

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Posted 07 May 2008 - 08:29 AM

Thanks for all the responses. I'll keep on the lookout for scrap steel.

What is it about an anvil that can be so addicting?

#24 esantoro

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Posted 23 May 2008 - 07:54 PM

I'm so close to getting this 15 lbs anvil

http://www.harborfre...Itemnumber=3999

as well as HF's 55 lbs anvil.

ed

#25 esantoro

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Posted 24 May 2008 - 10:04 AM

i finally pulled the trigger on a Harbor Freight order. When I saw the add for the 15 lbs anvil, I couldn't resist. I also got the 55 pounder as well as a bunch of other cool toys/tools I had been putting off for a complete order.


It's good to keep old Harbor Freight flyers, because you can punch in the item numbers and pull up products that don't seem to come up online any other way.



ed

#26 esantoro

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Posted 07 June 2008 - 03:30 PM

Is there a special way to prep or finish or polish the top of an anvil that has radial patterns (looks like thumbprint lines) on it?

Thanks,

Ed

#27 rickybobby

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Posted 02 August 2008 - 12:48 AM

Is there a special way to prep or finish or polish the top of an anvil that has radial patterns (looks like thumbprint lines) on it?

Thanks,

Ed


Ed,

Use a disc grinder and start with #40 grit paper. Move on to finer grits and remember to keep it moving in a "cross hatch" patern. That will keep your surface flat. "Cross hatch" patern is useing the top 1/2 of the disc, leaning it to the left while moving to the right, leaning to the rt. while moving to the left. The patern looks like X's and keeps the surface flat.

#40 grit

#80 grit

#150 grit you can use a jitter bug sander (or a vibrating sander)

#220 grit you can use a jitter bug sander (or a vibrating sander)

You can go to higher grits depending on how polished you want it.

You can spend more time on rounding or cleaning up edges with the finer grit papers, be careful with the #40 grit it will eat up metal quick. These kinds of tools from harbour freight just are not finished off as nice as some others, but with some time spent grinding, sanding and polishing it can be real nice.

Rick Jorgenson
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#28 ArtS

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Posted 02 August 2008 - 10:24 AM

Another option for an anvil is getting a bench vise. They usually have a flat suface that can be used to pound on. http://www.harborfre...temnumber=32115
ArtS
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#29 fishguy

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Posted 18 August 2008 - 05:16 PM

Another possibility, if you have a metal scrapyard nearby is a piece of railroad rail. There are ususally all sorts of interesting shapes. I was able to find an 8" long peice of steel 4x4.

#30 Bree

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Posted 18 August 2008 - 08:29 PM

I need to get a better anvil for setting caps on tubular rivets for my bags. I currently use a small anvil from Tandy, which is fine for Jiffy rivets but not for tubular rivets and caps. Can anyone recommend a good bench anvil.

Left to my own devices, I'd order this 55lbs anvil from Harbor Freight:

http://www.harborfre...?Itemnumber=806

By the way, what is the square hole for in the Harbor Freight anvil?
Thanks,
ed


I have that anvil. It is well worth the price. The only thing I would change about it is the absence of holes to bolt it down to the bench. But you can get around that limitation pretty easily. I use it frequently for a lot of things... not just leatherwork but woodworking and general shop chores.
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