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How To Finish An Antiqued Project


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#1 Indy

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Posted 10 September 2010 - 03:55 AM

Hi guys,

I don't know if that has been discussed here before, just couldn't find a post about it.

Last month I made more than 40 bags, pouches and large seamans bags. They really needed to look well used and beaten up,so I colloured them all differently, edge shaded them and some of them I antiqued with both "Fiebings Antique finish" and "Fiebings antique stains".

I know these products look both great once there on the project, but do require 2 coats of resoleene that they will really stay on and be water repellent.
Resoleene is mostly way to shiny for my taste and often washes away the antique stains while applyed (which is why I'm thinking of doing that by spraying it onto it, is that any good?)


So, here is the actuall question:

Is there a way to get antique stains and finish water resistant AND matt, no matter if the project is carved or not?




Products I tried that didn't passed the water test:

Fiebings antique finish without anything (looked quit matt, but wasn't water resistant at all)
Fiebings antique finish with bees wax dressing (looked not bad, but didn't last)
Fiebings antique finish with leather oil (left a waxy surface)

Fiebings antique stain without anything (looked very nice, even and matt, but didn't stayed on)
Fiebings antique stain with leather oil (brilliant looking surface, a little waxy, collour doesn't stays on properly)
Fiebings antique stain with bees wax dressing (allmost the same result as with antique finish and bees wax dressing)

Products I tried that passed the water test:

Fiebings antique finish with resoleene (after 2 coats the project antique collour stays on and the product is water repellent, but extremly shiny)
Fiebings antique stain with resoleene (see above)



I'd love to read how you do your antique jobs and if somebody nows a good method/product that might work for me or even got a good reciep for making your own antique stains that will stay matt and are water resistant
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#2 bex DK

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Posted 10 September 2010 - 09:37 AM

What about trying the resolene then topping it with the beeswax? That might remove some fo the shine while allowing the resolene to offer water protection.

#3 Indy

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Posted 10 September 2010 - 11:47 AM

allready tried. still too shiny
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#4 pete

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Posted 10 September 2010 - 02:21 PM

Mix Bick's#4 with dye. Rub it on and then buff a few minutes late. Water resistant(VERY) and even dye job.
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#5 KatieG

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Posted 11 September 2010 - 12:09 AM

What I use for a matte finish, and in 4 layers seems to be waterproof (using it for coasters) is the Leather Sheen spray. Not so much the liquid, but the spray has worked magnificently.
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#6 Indy

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Posted 11 September 2010 - 08:39 AM

leather sheen spray sounds good to me, I think I'm going to give it a try. I'm was just looking through tandy's liquids section and realized that they don't sell "antique stain" any longer. I guess eco-flo is more or less the same, isn't it?
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#7 terrymac

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Posted 11 September 2010 - 09:48 AM

Indy,

They are the same in that they both have "Antique" in their name, but not as far as product charachteristics. As someone who messed up some things with the Eco-Flo, I would find me another Fieblings' supplier. The Eco Flo is probably fine if you take the time to learn how to use it correctly, but I will stick with the Fieblings. JUst my opinion

Terry



#8 Indy

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 04:05 AM

Indy,

They are the same in that they both have "Antique" in their name, but not as far as product charachteristics. As someone who messed up some things with the Eco-Flo, I would find me another Fieblings' supplier. The Eco Flo is probably fine if you take the time to learn how to use it correctly, but I will stick with the Fieblings. JUst my opinion

Terry


oops, allready ordered a qrt. gallon :( Could you describe what happened? Does it work with satin sheen spray aswell?
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#9 terrymac

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 09:31 AM

The biggest difference is in the way the EcoFlo interacts with other liquids. When I finish tooling a piece, I like to apply Neatsfoot Oil to get some moisture back in the leather. When you do that with EcoFlo, the stain does not penetrate the leather as well as the Fieblings. I also like to use a resist before applying the antique, and I found out you cannot use Neatlac with the EcoFlo. You get some some awfully funny colors. I have found out , however, in spite of what they will tell you at Tandy's, you can use Neatlac as a finish over the EcoFlo with no problems. I guess my biggest problem I have with the EcoFlo is time you have to apply and work into the leather. The Fieblings is much more forgiving, especially when you are working with a larger piece. To me, the EcoFlo is much faster drying, and it makes it harder to blend different areas together without getting dark areas. I see a lot of good work shown on LW using the EcoFlo, I'm just comfortable with the way Fieblings work, and have no profound reason to change. Can't help you the Super Sheen. Hope this helps
Terry

Edited by terrymac, 12 September 2010 - 09:35 AM.


#10 MADMAX22

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 12:38 PM

I have tried using many different finishes in my learning process and to be honest the best one I have found so far is the old school mix I made myself. Melted parafin wax, bees wax, and some oil together then let it cool. Once it cooled it was similer to sno-seal (which I also really like). It leaves a very nice mellow sheen and can be reapplied as necessary over time. If you dont feel like making it yourself then you can get several similer items on line or locally. Ones that seem to work really well are picards leather dressing, sno-seal, bees natural. I use to play with trying to use a sealer per say but found these protect the leather, look really good, and are relatively easy to use.

#11 CitizenKate

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 01:42 PM

So, here is the actuall question:

Is there a way to get antique stains and finish water resistant AND matt, no matter if the project is carved or not?

...

I'd love to read how you do your antique jobs and if somebody nows a good method/product that might work for me or even got a good reciep for making your own antique stains that will stay matt and are water resistant

I do a lot of antiquing (about 99% of my projects get antique applied to them) and I also prefer more of a matte or satin finish. (Too glossy looks too much like plastic to me.) There are a few different finishes I use, depending on how water-resistant/proof I need the finished item to be.

Most wax finishes are fairly water-resistant, but not water-proof. I use it on items that will not normally be used outdoors or exposed to a harsh environment. There are several good products in this category that give leather a nice satin finish are Bee-Natural, just about any neutral shoe polish, or Aussie Wax. I've used all of these with good results. (The shoe polish goes on better if it's applied with a soft-bristled shoe brush.)

If you need water-proof, I haven't found anything yet that beats a lacquer finish. Since you can't get Neat-Lac any more, a great alternative I found (actually David Theobald turned me onto it) is Deft clear satin wood finish. Indy, I'm not sure what you're going to find available in Austria (where there are no kangaroos <grin>), but probably any lacquer-based satin wood finish that you find in lumber or hardware stores would make a suitable alternative.

There's a trick to applying a lacquer finish. If you put it on too heavily, or if it puddles in the tooling impressions, it will form a plastic-y layer of solid finish that will crack when the leather is flexed. You only want as much on the leather as will absorb into it. So apply it in 2 or 3 very light coats. If you have carving or tooling, use a piece of sheepskin to apply it. Wipe it on, work it in a bit, then wipe off as much as you can. Let it dry to the touch between coats.


Kate

#12 terrymac

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Posted 12 September 2010 - 04:12 PM

I do a lot of antiquing (about 99% of my projects get antique applied to them) and I also prefer more of a matte or satin finish. (Too glossy looks too much like plastic to me.) There are a few different finishes I use, depending on how water-resistant/proof I need the finished item to be.

Most wax finishes are fairly water-resistant, but not water-proof. I use it on items that will not normally be used outdoors or exposed to a harsh environment. There are several good products in this category that give leather a nice satin finish are Bee-Natural, just about any neutral shoe polish, or Aussie Wax. I've used all of these with good results. (The shoe polish goes on better if it's applied with a soft-bristled shoe brush.)

If you need water-proof, I haven't found anything yet that beats a lacquer finish. Since you can't get Neat-Lac any more, a great alternative I found (actually David Theobald turned me onto it) is Deft clear satin wood finish. Indy, I'm not sure what you're going to find available in Austria (where there are no kangaroos <grin>), but probably any lacquer-based satin wood finish that you find in lumber or hardware stores would make a suitable alternative.

There's a trick to applying a lacquer finish. If you put it on too heavily, or if it puddles in the tooling impressions, it will form a plastic-y layer of solid finish that will crack when the leather is flexed. You only want as much on the leather as will absorb into it. So apply it in 2 or 3 very light coats. If you have carving or tooling, use a piece of sheepskin to apply it. Wipe it on, work it in a bit, then wipe off as much as you can. Let it dry to the touch between coats.


Kate


Kate,
You can't get Neatlac per se, but you can get the same product now called Clearlac. Bobby Parks spoke with the manufacturer, and they assured him it was the same product, different name. I think Springifield Leather is handling it as well as Panhandle Leather in Amarillo. I am just about out of Neatlac and will get getting some Clearlac shortly.
Terry

Edited by terrymac, 12 September 2010 - 04:14 PM.


#13 Indy

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Posted 15 September 2010 - 01:59 AM

guys,

thank you a lot for all the info, that was quit a bit allready.I will wait now until all my liquids arrive at my doorstep and will play a little arround with the eco flo and my remaining Fiebings antique stain and fool around with your described sealing methods. I let you know how it goes
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