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Removing Adhesive From Leather.


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#1 Gawdzilla

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 07:02 AM

My late wife was a librarian and she used "Goo Gone" to remove tape residue from books. I was wondering if anybody had ever used it on leather?

#2 rodeomic

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 11:18 AM

My late wife was a librarian and she used "Goo Gone" to remove tape residue from books. I was wondering if anybody had ever used it on leather?



No, but I have used acetone. Not familiar with Goo Gone. Good luck!

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#3 Gawdzilla

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Posted 09 February 2011 - 07:08 PM

Thanks. I'll report back.

#4 Gawdzilla

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Posted 10 February 2011 - 04:01 PM

First test: It removed dried rubber cement cleanly. Next test is to do strips of untouched leather alternating with treated leather to see if dyes are affected.

#5 JohnBarton

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Posted 11 February 2011 - 05:28 AM

You can use a light oil sometimes. I use olive oil or even facial oil (eeeeewww) to remove glue residue.
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#6 Gawdzilla

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Posted 11 February 2011 - 06:24 AM

You can use a light oil sometimes. I use olive oil or even facial oil (eeeeewww) to remove glue residue.


Is that "spot cleaning" or should I do the whole piece to keep it even?

#7 JohnBarton

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Posted 12 February 2011 - 01:37 AM

Is that "spot cleaning" or should I do the whole piece to keep it even?



If you use a VERY VERY little bit then you can just do it on the area with the glue and the oil will dissipate quickly. What I like to do with olive oil is to put a little bit on a washcloth. Then I dab that on a piece of cardboard and THEN I rub my finger lightly on the washcloth and use my finger to gently remove the glue.

That seems to work most of the time.




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#8 Gawdzilla

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Posted 12 February 2011 - 06:58 AM

If you use a VERY VERY little bit then you can just do it on the area with the glue and the oil will dissipate quickly. What I like to do with olive oil is to put a little bit on a washcloth. Then I dab that on a piece of cardboard and THEN I rub my finger lightly on the washcloth and use my finger to gently remove the glue.

That seems to work most of the time.





I'll keep that in mind. Full day at the wolf sanctuary so it will be tomorrow before I get the test strips done on the Goo Gone.

#9 Gawdzilla

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Posted 15 February 2011 - 01:17 PM

Okay. I applied Goo Gone to clean leather and let it set overnight. I dyed the leather this morning and got no indication of stripes. So far so good. The stuff is really good on rubber cement, a vaguely damp paper towel cleaned dried cement off some leather quickly. I'm letting that dry to see if there's any "ghosts" from the glue when I dye it.

Oh, by the way, "your mileage may vary", so test it out for yourself to see if you get good usable results.

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#10 Go2Tex

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Posted 15 February 2011 - 01:37 PM

Rubber cement usually just rubs off anyway. It doesn't seem to penetrate. Try it on regular contact cement. About the best thing I've found for that is the stuff they sell at autoparts stores for removing road tar. Then lots and lots of deglazer will maybe allow the dye to penetrate the leather where the glue was, but don't count on it.
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#11 Gawdzilla

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Posted 15 February 2011 - 05:20 PM

Rubber cement usually just rubs off anyway. It doesn't seem to penetrate. Try it on regular contact cement. About the best thing I've found for that is the stuff they sell at autoparts stores for removing road tar. Then lots and lots of deglazer will maybe allow the dye to penetrate the leather where the glue was, but don't count on it.


Okay, I'll try it on contact cement. Stand by for news!





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