Jump to content


Photo

Coffee Ground Dye


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 rickeyfro

rickeyfro

    Leatherworker

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 734 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Slidell Louisiana
  • Leatherwork Specialty:motorcycle seats
  • Interested in learning about:All leatherwork

Posted 01 March 2012 - 09:39 PM

Ive heard time and again of people dying leather with used coffee grounds, can anyone give me a little more details on the process? Like the preperation of the mix, is it just water and grounds? What about mold? Seems like there would have to be some kind of an after bath or something.

#2 Dwight

Dwight

    Leatherworker.net Regular

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1,903 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Central Ohio
  • Interests:Church Pastor, Shooter, Leatherworking, Hunting, making most anything for the first time (yeah, I get bored easy)
  • Leatherwork Specialty:gun leather
  • Interested in learning about:working with leather
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?:from 1911.com

Posted 01 March 2012 - 10:35 PM

Ive heard time and again of people dying leather with used coffee grounds, can anyone give me a little more details on the process? Like the preperation of the mix, is it just water and grounds? What about mold? Seems like there would have to be some kind of an after bath or something.


Hope you don't mind, Rick, . . . thought I'd just reserve a space in here too, . . . I'd like to know.

I go through 3 each 12 cup pots every day, . . . and if I can turn those grounds into some profit, . . . or less expense, . . . that'd be great.

May God bless,
Dwight
If you can breathe, . . . thank God.

If you can read, . . . thank a teacher.

If you are reading this in English, . . . thank a veteran.

www.dwightsgunleather.com

#3 Iron Pounder

Iron Pounder

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 218 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Crazytown
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?:Google

Posted 01 March 2012 - 10:44 PM

Here is what I have tried. I made up a super strong pot of coffee and then heated that on the stove to evap most of the water off. I then let it cool off and set the leather down in a pan of the coffee. It turned a very nice brown but didn't stay that way once it dried. Maybe I should have just used the grounds themselves. I drink way too much coffee so I would like to know a way that works as well.



#4 King's X

King's X

    Leatherworker.net Regular

  • Contributing Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3,011 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Central Texas, USA
  • Interests:For 2014 ~ Still trying to learn to draw my own patterns.
  • Leatherwork Specialty:Anything Leather!
  • Interested in learning about:Old Western Floral Carving and its history~!
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?:Google

Posted 03 March 2012 - 10:26 PM

When you are done with the grounds throw them in your flower beds for nutrients. Be careful with dogs though they like to eat it, but will soon find out it was not a great idea and throw up.
Greetings from Central Texas!

The Grain Side Up

#5 Ladykahu

Ladykahu

    Member

  • Contributing Member
  • PipPip
  • 193 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Australia, Melbourne
  • Interests:Variety of craftworks, primarily textile artist. Australian native fish
  • Leatherwork Specialty:Learning
  • Interested in learning about:molding, bags
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?:link from a youtube video

Posted 04 March 2012 - 04:56 AM

You might need a mordant to really make the colour stick.

When dying fabric in the past I have boiled it for 30 mins.. not really an option for leather.

Natalie
Insanity is hereditory, you get it from your kids





Similar Topics Collapse

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users