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Wickett And Craig Vs. Hermann Oak


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#16 abn

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Posted 09 March 2012 - 10:29 AM

While W & C leather is generally of a softer temper than HO they will double or triple plate it at your request IIRC for free - this gives it a much firmer hand


so I went with WC because they put out a consistent product that you can adjust in finishing. It the product is too soft, have it jacked harder. The finishing dept at WC is their strong point, use it.


Chuck and/or Art -- at the risk of taking this thread in a new direction, would you explain what you mean by "triple plate" and "jacked harder"? I've always purchased my leather straight from a retailer and have no experience with tanneries. Still, I'm curious about what you mean by the above quotes... It sounds like a tannery can customize your order to give it more firmness, etc.?

#17 Art

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Posted 09 March 2012 - 11:08 AM

The tannery can plate, a big press they use to press the leather between two plates, or jack, a roller press that they can set to compress the leather. This adds stiffness through compression of the fibers. There are also chemicals that can be applied to accomplish something similar chemically instead of physically. Weaver sells that chemical although I have never used it.

Art

Chuck and/or Art -- at the risk of taking this thread in a new direction, would you explain what you mean by "triple plate" and "jacked harder"? I've always purchased my leather straight from a retailer and have no experience with tanneries. Still, I'm curious about what you mean by the above quotes... It sounds like a tannery can customize your order to give it more firmness, etc.?


For heaven's sakes pilgrim, make yourself a strop!

#18 Colt Hammerless

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Posted 09 March 2012 - 05:30 PM

I talked with Matt from W&C for probably 3 hours at the Wickenburg show in Feburary. He said that they can press it to different levels of firmness. He mentioned how one big name holster manufacturer will specify they want it pressed or "holstered" at 5000 psi, where another will specify they want it at 6000 psi. I had them "holster" a side I got from them recently, though I didn't specify how firm I wanted it (didn't know you could do that at the time.) I haven't made anything with the piece yet, but it feels about as firm as HO I've used. Also, if you are buying drum dyed leather, some of if has the dye struck completely through, and some doesn't. If you want it struck all the way through, just ask, and they'll pick out a piece for you.

Colt Hammerless

#19 esmache

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Posted 31 May 2012 - 03:58 PM

Hi Colby,
The reason I asked what method you were using for casing is because you mentioned that you cased by pulling your leather through a pan of water and based on that comment you are just wetting the leather but not casing it. Many people mistakenly use the term "casing" for wetting but I didn't want to assume that was the case here. The casing process can be achieved with some variations, such as using additives or using casing boxes ILO bags, etc., but the bottom line is that leather is either cased or it isn't. The process doesn't change. It doesn't matter if I'm using W&C, HO, Thoroughbred or Tandy leather, the casing process is the same. So if my assumption is correct and you are simply wetting your leather, you will benefit greatly by casing. However if you are truly casing your leather then there are a couple of things you might try.

The first is to re-sharpen your swivel knife blade. You would be amazed at how many people cut with dull blades and don't know it and that's understandable because if a person has never had a sharp blade how would they know what sharp really is? As Brent mentioned, the chattering you feel is corrosion forming on the blade due to the residual chemicals in the leather. Sometimes you get a side which is just difficult to cut and requires a lot of stropping (which does dull your blade, BTW).

So the next thing to try is adding a small amount of Joy dish washing detergent and a small amount of liquid glycerine to your casing solution. The soap is a surfactant and helps the leather absorb the water more completely and the glycerine seems to help the leather to cut a little smoother. I think it's acting like a lubricant, but I can't prove that. Additionally when I have a side which is difficult to cut I will apply a light lather of Ivory bar soap to the surface of the leather, again, to act as a lubricant while cutting.

With all that said, I rarely need to apply anything to the surface of the leather when using cased leather. So anyway, hopefully some of this will help, however, if I have made any assumptions in error I apologize and please ignore me!
Good luck,
Bobby


Hi Bobby.
You said <<adding a small amount of Joy dish washing detergent and a small amount of liquid glycerine to your casing solution>>
Can you tell me how much is the amount of dish washing detergent and glycerine you add to the water of the casing solution?
Thank you in advance.
Marcelo

#20 hidepounder

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Posted 31 May 2012 - 06:36 PM

Hi Bobby.
You said <<adding a small amount of Joy dish washing detergent and a small amount of liquid glycerine to your casing solution>>
Can you tell me how much is the amount of dish washing detergent and glycerine you add to the water of the casing solution?
Thank you in advance.
Marcelo

Marcelo i probably put about teaspoon of soap and 1/2 teaspoon of glycerin to two quarts of water. Sometimes I use a little more of each. I don't measure.....I just add a little and I'm done.
Bobby

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#21 Mudruck

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 11:05 AM

One thing that pretty much changed my world in casing my leather was to get a plastic tub with a snap on lid from Wally World as my casing box.

I mostly do medium and smaller items like holsters, wallets and belts. I soak my leather pretty much like you're saying yo do. Run it through a pan of water slowly to let it absorb a good amount of water and then into the bin it goes until the next day. After that I pull it out and let it sit for an hour maybe and it is ready to carve and tool. The bin has enough airspace to let the majority of the water evaporate but still retain enough water to stay moist.

One thing I have found out though is that you have to wash the tub out with a bleach/water solution once in a while or it gets a case of the funk.

I looked around on the web and couldn't find the exact tub but it pretty much looks like this....

http://tianliplastic...84_5269822.html

Edited by Mudruck, 01 June 2012 - 11:08 AM.






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