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How Dangerous Is Fiebing's Oil Dye?


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#1 Chavez

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 08:49 AM

Hi!

Having read a few topics on water-based dyes, I decided that I'd really like to know just how dangeroud fiebing's oil pro dyes (and isopropyl in particular) are.

Firstly, in terms of inhalation while dyeing: is this a case of a couple dead brain cells or is it so hazardous that I should try and reduce my exposure to it as much as possible (wear a gas mask :Lighten: ) ?

Secondly, how safe is this dye if it is applied to a product for a little kid (say 2y/o) who might chew on it and do any other crazy things to it that kids tend to do (say, shove it up his nose:) )?




Thank you for your advice!



#2 terrymac

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 10:23 AM

If I am not mistaking, Fiebing's Spirit dyes are alcohol based while the Pro oil dyes are oil based. In either case, there is not much odor to either one, and I really don't believe you will need a gas mask. Can't answer the part about kids chewing, all I know is my kids were raised around dyed leather, and they seemed to have turned out fine with kids of their own. That was back before there was anything such as water based dyes for leather.
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#3 ChuckBurrows

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 12:59 PM

The oil dyes are NOT oil based - see the MSDS - they are an "improved" version of the standard spirit dyes per Fiebings.

FWIW - any type of spirit based dye (many if not most contain not only alcohol, but toluene, acetone, xylene, and other toxic chemicals.) So yes they can be dangerous to one's health especially with long term exposure. Kidny and liver problesm are some of the most common and some of the hardest to detect with standardized testing. Personal note - I was diagnosed with stage 2 Non-alcoholic Steato Hepatitis (one step away from cirrohsis) about 12 years ago and the conclusion by the doctors (since I was not a heavy drinker and should not drink at all now) is that the root cause was/is due to exposure of toxic chemicals. I have worked as both a wood finisher and leather crafter for close to 50 years and in the old days such exposure was common since even common sense safety measures were often little used. Most of the common chemicals used in dying such as alcohol, acetone, etc. show up in the liver within 15 minutes and the body does not eliminate them easily if at all leading to cumulative effects that may not show up for years, when it is often too late to reverse the effects such as in my case.
Best advice: It is OK to use such dyes, but also to use common sense such as wearing good rubber gloves designed for chemical use, a good face mask with the proper filters (not just a dust mask) - reverse filter is even better but pricey, and a well ventilated area with a fan or two that blows the fumes away from onself. I still use such dyes when neede but limit my exposure as much as possible.
As for chewing on a piece of leather dyed with anything - not recommended no matter what dye - even a lot of the "natural" dyes can be toxic to the very young in particular.

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#4 Chavez

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 03:18 PM

Thanks Chuck!



#5 katsass

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 09:06 AM

Hi!

Having read a few topics on water-based dyes, I decided that I'd really like to know just how dangeroud fiebing's oil pro dyes (and isopropyl in particular) are.

Firstly, in terms of inhalation while dyeing: is this a case of a couple dead brain cells or is it so hazardous that I should try and reduce my exposure to it as much as possible (wear a gas mask :Lighten: ) ?

Secondly, how safe is this dye if it is applied to a product for a little kid (say 2y/o) who might chew on it and do any other crazy things to it that kids tend to do (say, shove it up his nose:) )?




Thank you for your advice!




Chavez, Chuck covered it well. You can get a GOOD mask at Home Depot, or Lowes and/or OSH (most likely other too) for around $25 or so. A he said, make sure it's rated for chemical odor/solvent protection. My all-purpose shop is in a little 10'x12' building, and, especially in winter, is closed up pretty well. I ALWAYS use the mask when using the airbrush to apply dyes. The fumes will do nasty things to you. Ask me how I found that, out long ago. Mike

Edited by katsass, 08 April 2012 - 09:14 AM.

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#6 TexasJack

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 11:04 PM

Chuck is about as knowledgeable as it gets on this subject, but let me add one thing. People safely handle very toxic chemicals every day without getting sick or dying. If you show a proper amount of respect for the chemicals you are handling, you can do the same. Generally, ingestion is the most dangerous, followed by inhalation, then skin absorption. Use gloves - better yet, make sure to use the right gloves - and proper ventilation with additional respiratory protection if necessary. Every chemical sold has a Material Safety Data Sheet, or MSDS that is publicly available. The easiest way to get one is by googling the product or by looking for MSDS on the company's web site. While MSDSs aren't particularly consistent, they do list the proper protective equipment (PPE) and the potential hazards associated with the chemicals in the product.


#7 Chavez

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 03:22 AM

Thanks!

I currently only use a spare room for small items (no airbrushing to apply paint, just daubers), so I guess I don't have much exposure at the moment.

However, I am planning to start dip-dyeing and making bigger items, so all your advice is very helpful, cause the amount fo fumes will soon go up!

Also I didn't realise that I need special gloves - I was just using regular rubber ones for general household use from local supermarket!






#8 TexasJack

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 10:35 PM

Fortunately, your local hardware store probably carries several types of gloves. Chemical-resistant gloves are made with different kinds of rubber: natural, butyl, neoprene, nitrile and fluorocarbon (viton); or various kinds of plastic: polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyvinyl alcohol and polyethylene. Nitrile gloves are very good for chlorinated solvents, alcohols, and oils, but are not particularly good around aromatic solvents, ketones, or acetates.

Here's an MSDS for Fiebing's dye: MSDS

#9 Chavez

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 02:03 AM

Thanks!

Looking at pro oil dye's 3 main components which are isopropanol, ethyl acetate and xylene, would nitrile be the best all-rounder considering that isopropyl is also used to cut the dye?

Google says that it doesn't offer much protection from xylene and ethyl acetate, but there's no universal glove for this =(



#10 Shooter McGavin

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 04:21 PM

I use non-powdered nitrile gloves and have never had a problem other than last week when I was dip dying a bunch of green pieces and got a pinhole in the thumb of the glove. The dye is still wearing off lol.





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