Jump to content


Photo

Best Way To Make Something Like This?


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 Amanita

Amanita

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 15 posts

Posted 09 April 2012 - 03:00 AM

So I want to make a leather breastplate similar in style to this:
http://www.medievalc...mci-2701_2_.png

I like the overall shape of this, but want an art deco skyscraper-ish look, instead of celtic. I've got some of Tandy's domed rivets to use, to suggest the rivets they used to use when building skyscrapers.

However, I'm a bit lost. One, I'm female, plus sized. Short of breast cups (which I do NOT want), how best would I do something like this to fit a female chest?

Also, would I have to wet the leather to form it? One person told me that I would have to wet form it, and bake it!
Is that overkill?
Now, the armor is going to be used for cosplay, but I don't want it to be completely flimsy- I have a side of 9 oz leather I plan to use for the main body, and some lighter stuff for the straps.
Do I need to harden it? If so, what method is best for larger pieces like the top of the breastplate?

If anyone's curious, I'm doing a costume that depicts an avatar of the Empire State Building, hence the Art Deco and rivets:)

#2 Eldorado

Eldorado

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 72 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Colorado
  • Leatherwork Specialty:Armor, Pouches, Wine Transporteurs
  • Interested in learning about:Pretty Much Everything

Posted 10 April 2012 - 06:04 PM

So I want to make a leather breastplate similar in style to this:
http://www.medievalc...mci-2701_2_.png

I like the overall shape of this, but want an art deco skyscraper-ish look, instead of celtic. I've got some of Tandy's domed rivets to use, to suggest the rivets they used to use when building skyscrapers.

However, I'm a bit lost. One, I'm female, plus sized. Short of breast cups (which I do NOT want), how best would I do something like this to fit a female chest?

Also, would I have to wet the leather to form it? One person told me that I would have to wet form it, and bake it!
Is that overkill?
Now, the armor is going to be used for cosplay, but I don't want it to be completely flimsy- I have a side of 9 oz leather I plan to use for the main body, and some lighter stuff for the straps.
Do I need to harden it? If so, what method is best for larger pieces like the top of the breastplate?

If anyone's curious, I'm doing a costume that depicts an avatar of the Empire State Building, hence the Art Deco and rivets:)



I have a couple of thoughts I might offer.

First, one way to start is with a doublet sewing pattern that fits you. Take note that the arm hole area on the doublet needs to be adjusted to be much larger in leather than on the pattern. Also take note that the armor shown is actually largely made up of segments. The top part seems to be a single piece, but below the bottom of the breast, those are separate smaller pieces, hence the rivets. The bits that start at the nipples and go up, appear to be holding a joint together. You could do the same thing, just larger to accomodate the female bust. I wouldnt be surprised if there isnt a cloth or thin leather backing to which the bottom segments are secured that holds it all together. Doing the segmented thing makes the armor more flexible and gives range of motion, but means you are working with alot more pieces. If you dont like the doublet pattern approach, then I'd recommend the aluminum foil and card stock approach.

Second, you asked about weight. 9oz should work nicely for what you're planning. It could even be a little heavy. However, wet molding it should be just fine. If you dye it black with alcohol dye it will get even stiffer. Find a way to hang them to let them dry and the shaping should stay. The business of cooking them and hardening them seems to be more about using leather in SCA combat. I do it for leather masks, since it turns the leather wood like, but you shouldnt need it here in my experience. It will also make the armor very unforgiving to wear.

Hope this helps.
P. Bowie Coleman, Renaissance Designer
Tudor Rose Leather Workshop
www.tudorroseleather.com
tudorroseleather@live.com

#3 Amanita

Amanita

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 15 posts

Posted 15 April 2012 - 01:40 AM

If I go through my sewing patterns I should be able to find a doublet or vest pattern, either men's or women's. I'll have to remember to buy some cheap fabric to make mockup pattern pieces from. I'm going to get a friend to help with making a duct tape dress form to work over as well, which should make things easier. I've actually got some other pics of this thing that show it being segmented- I like the segments- those make it easier to position pieces on oddly shaped parts of the hide, so there's less waste of those odd pieces. I'm aiming for a professional looking costume, so I want to stick with my leather- foil covered cardboard would just make the cosplay outfit look like a grade school art project, not in keeping with the fabric parts I already have made, which look pretty slick.

#4 Eldorado

Eldorado

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 72 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Colorado
  • Leatherwork Specialty:Armor, Pouches, Wine Transporteurs
  • Interested in learning about:Pretty Much Everything

Posted 16 April 2012 - 02:01 PM

If I go through my sewing patterns I should be able to find a doublet or vest pattern, either men's or women's. I'll have to remember to buy some cheap fabric to make mockup pattern pieces from. I'm going to get a friend to help with making a duct tape dress form to work over as well, which should make things easier. I've actually got some other pics of this thing that show it being segmented- I like the segments- those make it easier to position pieces on oddly shaped parts of the hide, so there's less waste of those odd pieces. I'm aiming for a professional looking costume, so I want to stick with my leather- foil covered cardboard would just make the cosplay outfit look like a grade school art project, not in keeping with the fabric parts I already have made, which look pretty slick.



From your note, I think I left you with the wrong perception of the tin foil and cardboard thing. I meant using them to make the patterns. I've found that using fabric is difficult because it drapes differently than leather will. Instead, on difficult to figure pieces, I'll take tin foil, make a 16"x16" piece of perhaps 4 thicknesses and mold it around the body part. Then you can take a sharpy and mark the bits to be cut off or notched or whatever. Then, when you lay it flat again and cut those bits off or tape some cardboard to certain points, you'll have translated a 3D shape to a 2D shape. Also, you can run a pencil around a shape made of tin foil in a way you can't around fabric. I've done the same thing with just card stock on less complicated body parts.

Of course I wouldnt suggest that you'd be wearing the tin foil. Your question indicated a much higher level of Cos'ing than that.

BTW, I agree with the segmentation approach you've mentioned. Unless you are independently wealthy, its very hard to get a single side that has few enough blemishes to cut a whole cuirass out. I've done it, but it took alot of time sorting through hides with the shape and size in mind.
P. Bowie Coleman, Renaissance Designer
Tudor Rose Leather Workshop
www.tudorroseleather.com
tudorroseleather@live.com

#5 Amanita

Amanita

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 15 posts

Posted 18 April 2012 - 02:29 AM

From your note, I think I left you with the wrong perception of the tin foil and cardboard thing. I meant using them to make the patterns. I've found that using fabric is difficult because it drapes differently than leather will. Instead, on difficult to figure pieces, I'll take tin foil, make a 16"x16" piece of perhaps 4 thicknesses and mold it around the body part. Then you can take a sharpy and mark the bits to be cut off or notched or whatever. Then, when you lay it flat again and cut those bits off or tape some cardboard to certain points, you'll have translated a 3D shape to a 2D shape. Also, you can run a pencil around a shape made of tin foil in a way you can't around fabric. I've done the same thing with just card stock on less complicated body parts.

Of course I wouldnt suggest that you'd be wearing the tin foil. Your question indicated a much higher level of Cos'ing than that.

BTW, I agree with the segmentation approach you've mentioned. Unless you are independently wealthy, its very hard to get a single side that has few enough blemishes to cut a whole cuirass out. I've done it, but it took alot of time sorting through hides with the shape and size in mind.


Ok, that helps:) And it's a pretty good idea, I'd never heard it before!

#6 SplinterLink

SplinterLink

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Round Rock TX / Lincoln NE
  • Interests:NERO, Cosplay, anything inbetween?
  • Leatherwork Specialty:Armor
  • Interested in learning about:Armor
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?:google

Posted 18 April 2012 - 01:08 PM

I've made a formed cuirass for my sister, we did a plaster negative, then a fiberglass positive to form the leather over. You can check out our tutorial
http://www.embercost...anscuirass.html

And yes, it was a lot of work even before starting the leather.

#7 Eldorado

Eldorado

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 72 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Colorado
  • Leatherwork Specialty:Armor, Pouches, Wine Transporteurs
  • Interested in learning about:Pretty Much Everything

Posted 22 April 2012 - 10:38 PM

I've made a formed cuirass for my sister, we did a plaster negative, then a fiberglass positive to form the leather over. You can check out our tutorial
http://www.embercost...anscuirass.html

And yes, it was a lot of work even before starting the leather.


Top notch.


And that's a technique I've never tried... for sure. How does the wax behave on a warm day?
P. Bowie Coleman, Renaissance Designer
Tudor Rose Leather Workshop
www.tudorroseleather.com
tudorroseleather@live.com

#8 SplinterLink

SplinterLink

    New Member

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Round Rock TX / Lincoln NE
  • Interests:NERO, Cosplay, anything inbetween?
  • Leatherwork Specialty:Armor
  • Interested in learning about:Armor
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?:google

Posted 24 April 2012 - 12:32 AM

Top notch.


And that's a technique I've never tried... for sure. How does the wax behave on a warm day?


A couple of days out at the Ren Faire in Texas, no problems. The whole thing is slightly more flexible than some water boiled leather and oven hardened experiments I've tried. I still wouldn't leave in the car in the summer...

#9 Eldorado

Eldorado

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 72 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Colorado
  • Leatherwork Specialty:Armor, Pouches, Wine Transporteurs
  • Interested in learning about:Pretty Much Everything

Posted 27 April 2012 - 05:41 PM

A couple of days out at the Ren Faire in Texas, no problems. The whole thing is slightly more flexible than some water boiled leather and oven hardened experiments I've tried. I still wouldn't leave in the car in the summer...


Probably wise.
P. Bowie Coleman, Renaissance Designer
Tudor Rose Leather Workshop
www.tudorroseleather.com
tudorroseleather@live.com

#10 tenabrae

tenabrae

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 10 posts
  • Location:Melbourne, Australia

Posted 28 April 2012 - 08:55 AM

There wasn't really any such thing as 'female armour'. Theoretically it'll just squish your squishy bits like a corset would. In a design like that where it's just got basic shoulder straps you could just make the top panel a little more generous if you are particularly chesty.

Also if it's for costume I wouldn't bother hardening it (which is what the baking is for, though IMO it's not the best way to harden) ... I'm not sure how 9oz translates to what we use (over here leather is listed by thickness in mm) but something like 3.4mm leather holds shape just fine and can be easily water shaped if necessary... For that piece you wouldn't need to do much shaping, the only thing you'd need to wet it for is any carving you might do. You can see in that image most of the details is stamped or carved, there's not a lot of '3d' to it, mostly lines and panels.

You don't need wax to harden leather at all. You can simply expose it to hot water, it's a bit of an art. http://www.arador.co...terleather.html

Edited by tenabrae, 28 April 2012 - 08:59 AM.






Similar Topics Collapse

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users