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Toughest Thread For Hand Stitching


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#1 Schpacko

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 03:09 AM

Hi Guys

What is the toughest, most durable Thread for hand stitching out there that you know?

I usually use 18/4 barbour linen thread (beeswaxed before use), but i had some cases of fraying after about 1 year of use (iPhone-cases), which is not acceptable for the level of quality i am going for.

I read that some polyester threads are much tougher than linen... can you guys confirm that?


Cheers
Schpacko

#2 katsass

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 07:22 AM

Hi Guys

What is the toughest, most durable Thread for hand stitching out there that you know?

I usually use 18/4 barbour linen thread (beeswaxed before use), but i had some cases of fraying after about 1 year of use (iPhone-cases), which is not acceptable for the level of quality i am going for.

I read that some polyester threads are much tougher than linen... can you guys confirm that?


Cheers
Schpacko


From the old grump; Nyltex(sp?) is a pretty good alternative. I've used it, but still return to waxed linen for my work. Just an observation, it's possible that your stitching gouge isn't quite deep enough and/or you aren't running an overstitch after the stitching is completed if you have fraying problems. With a good deep gouge, properly prepared thread, stitched tight, then the overstitch and the final finish, you shouldn't have the problem. JMHO Mike

Edited by katsass, 13 June 2012 - 07:26 AM.

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#3 Kevin

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Posted 15 June 2012 - 08:34 PM

After using linen only for 20 years, I tried some nylon hand sewing thread that Ohio Travel Bag sells and I have never looked back. It has a nice hard finish and is not curly like machine thread. I don't know what 18/4 is, but I use it instead of 4 cord linen that we get here. When I need a lighter thread, I can just pull one ply out of it and it still looks good. Since it is not lubed, it holds wax pretty well.
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#4 SandSquid

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Posted 04 July 2012 - 10:10 AM

this stuff is awesome

www.brettunsvillage.com/leather/thread.htm

Waxed Poly Sewing thread 60" pre-tapered ends $12/Gross
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Edited by SandSquid, 04 July 2012 - 10:18 AM.

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#5 shtoink

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Posted 06 July 2012 - 02:14 PM

Has anyone considered using bow string material?

The question might initially sound odd, that is until you look at their characteristics. There is a multitude of colors and types, and there are some that have excellent fray resistance and negligible stretch. Unless you are applying more than 500 lbs of force. They tend to come prewaxed and in large spools.

Dacron is cheap and available in some 20+ colors.
Fast flight types are even stronger, fray less, same colors, but cost more.

I don't know if this is an appropriate material to use for stitching, but on paper it looks like it might work. I have no personal experience with it yet, but I did want to give it a try on one of my projects for testing purposes, soon.

#6 J Hayes

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Posted 05 September 2012 - 11:56 PM

FWIW. I haven't been at this long at all, I tried some Nyltex(sp?) and had it cut through a couple times in Horsehide. Tried some linen from ZW, I liked it better than Nyltex, but I thought it was a bit light weight. Then I bit the bullet and got 7 cord Barbour's linen, $55 or so for the spool of 781 yards, money well spent. I bought the white and dye to what I want, I'm going to buy andother spool in black. I got it from Landwerlen Leather, it seems hard to find. I also got myself some code, beeswax mixed with pitch to make it sticky,(Three Rivers Archery I think) stitches pull tight and don't loosen, Nyltex was bad for loosening. I stitch 5 SPI and it looks good IMO, I use Osborne 0 size harness needels and an diamond shape awl. Plus there's just something about looking at that big spool that makes me feel all warm and fuzzy! Like Katsass said, if you get the groove deep enough the cord will sit just below the surface protected from abraision. I'd be willing to send you a few yards of the Barbour's and a couple needles if you like.

Do remember it's just my opinion, and I haven't been at it long, but the feel of that Barbour's IS nice, and it didn't seem to fray while stitching like the other linen I tried.



JeremyAttached File  2012-09-05 23.53.02.jpg   120.64KB   304 downloadsAttached File  2012-09-05 23.53.25.jpg   120.63KB   312 downloads

Edited by J Hayes, 05 September 2012 - 11:57 PM.


#7 Grabagear

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Posted 06 September 2012 - 06:42 PM

Don't know If it's right or wrong but an old timer told me try 346 thread so I did. So at I like hand stitching with it. Maybe a little slippery but u get used to it. Very strong!

#8 luckylee

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 03:28 AM

Hi, I have used a lot if different threads over the years, but the best thread I have found for hand stitching is a product called tiger thread I use it in the 0.8 size there are quite a few colours, it's not an easy thread to get. But when you can get it its worth buying a couple if spools.
Hope that helps a little.
Take care.
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#9 yam350

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 05:58 AM

I don't get to leather work very often so I buy Marlowe's whipping yarn in small spools like an old fashioned 8mm movie spool, the no 2 thread size on that spool is 92 metres (302ft) from a local ships Chandler.
It comes in white, red blue, black and yellow and various thicknesses, it is waxed polyester. I have never had a fraying problem with it in 30 odd years on bike saddle bags, western sadddles and a whole lot more.
I have been toying with the idea of trying some of the braided fishing lines to see how they perform, one of the toughest for fishing is Dyneema which is designed to lay flat on the spool.It goes up to 150lbs breaking strain or more, I can tell you it is impossible to snap with bare hands and I am no weakling.

#10 St8LineGunsmith

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Posted 13 October 2012 - 08:16 AM

I use waxed nylon thread it is very strong and don't fray or fuzz up.

#11 seanafk

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Posted 05 November 2012 - 01:29 PM

Polycotton and linen have worked well for me but I notice if I don't stay on top of waxing, it tends to fuzz or unravel. Nylon is good though it apparently rots in sunlight and weather over a long time (years and years) but I have not experienced this first hand. At a certain point having thread that is tougher than your leather is a detriment as stress causes the the thread to cut through the leather (like those fancy wire cheese slicers). If you're using something tough like horsehide or pig, it probably doesn't matter but it might for calf or thinly skivved cowhide.
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#12 johnv474

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 10:00 PM

This is an old thread (no pun intended), but in case others find it through searching, as I did.... I prefer linen thread personally for a few reasons, even if other products may be stronger. I have also used polyster and Nyltex, which I understand to be a nylon-poly mix. I also tried fishing line before. If you want to go hog wild on strength, you can buy white nylon braided masons line from the hardware store, also available in neon colors. It is rated for 175 lbs, but is very thick. It would be difficult to thread even a 000 needle. My test requirwed pliers for every stitch.... but it will probably last!

Edited by johnv474, 23 August 2013 - 10:01 PM.


#13 Crimson Hides

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 10:26 AM

I use 60 - 80 lbs braided fishing line to hand sew most of my products. I think they are pretty tough.

#14 Tex Shooter

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Posted 24 August 2013 - 10:30 AM

I prefer Linen, but right now I am using waxed Poly. I got a big spool of it in a garage sale for a couple of bucks. Yep, I am cheap! Wish I could get all of my supplies in garage sales! -- Tex :cowboy:

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