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Singer 7-33


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#1 marcos89

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Posted 22 June 2012 - 04:33 PM

So i have this Singer 7-33 in my sights and i would like to get some feed back from people who have used it.As im considering on buying it. what thickness capabilities does it have, pros and cons..anything you would like to share will help greatly.

thank you!!

#2 busted

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Posted 22 June 2012 - 04:47 PM

This machine has only 9/16" under the pressure foot with alternating feed. It does not work well for leather stuff. You should aim at a different machine


So i have this Singer 7-33 in my sights and i would like to get some feed back from people who have used it.As im considering on buying it. what thickness capabilities does it have, pros and cons..anything you would like to share will help greatly.

thank you!!



#3 marcos89

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Posted 22 June 2012 - 05:34 PM

This machine has only 9/16" under the pressure foot with alternating feed. It does not work well for leather stuff. You should aim at a different machine




even if its one of those old ooold machines? im fairly new to sewing machines and im not sure what i should get. im looking to make holsters, wallets, belts horse tack and hopefully move up to saddles. i want something that is a little versatile but like i said im faily new to sewing machines.

#4 Wizcrafts

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Posted 22 June 2012 - 05:53 PM

Look into a Cowboy, Cobra or Techsew 441 clone. They are capable of sewing over 3/4 inch, with very heavy thread and are fully supported by our dealers who set them up and sell them.
Posted IMHO, by Wiz

#5 marcos89

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Posted 22 June 2012 - 07:01 PM

Look into a Cowboy, Cobra or Techsew 441 clone. They are capable of sewing over 3/4 inch, with very heavy thread and are fully supported by our dealers who set them up and sell them.


will they be able to sew light material as well?? or do i just need two different machines?

#6 Wizcrafts

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Posted 23 June 2012 - 12:24 AM

will they be able to sew light material as well?? or do i just need two different machines?

Yes and yes. They will sew thin material, and small diameter needles are available, but a smaller machine will do a better job with #69 thread, into a few ounces of wallet leather. I use a Singer 31-15 for wallet interiors and hemming clothes (#69 thread). I have a walking foot machine for medium duty work, up to 3/8 inch or so (#138 thread) (jeans, belts, seat covers), then the big Cowboy and a Union Lockstitch for the really thick work, with very heavy thread (#277 and up). I also have a long arm big bobbin Singer patcher, which is invaluable for sewing in any direction, for applying patches, repairing shoes and boots and odd jobs.
Posted IMHO, by Wiz

#7 marcos89

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Posted 23 June 2012 - 12:55 AM

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Yes and yes. They will sew thin material, and small diameter needles are available, but a smaller machine will do a better job with #69 thread, into a few ounces of wallet leather. I use a Singer 31-15 for wallet interiors and hemming clothes (#69 thread). I have a walking foot machine for medium duty work, up to 3/8 inch or so (#138 thread) (jeans, belts, seat covers), then the big Cowboy and a Union Lockstitch for the really thick work, with very heavy thread (#277 and up). I also have a long arm big bobbin Singer patcher, which is invaluable for sewing in any direction, for applying patches, repairing shoes and boots and odd jobs.


But if you wer in my position, on a budget and knowing what you know now. What machine would you recommend that is versatile? Who wouldn't want to have 4 or 5 machines, but at the time the money ain't there.


#8 DoubleC

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Posted 23 June 2012 - 01:33 AM

Marcos, I use my Singer 15-91 for everything from silk up to 1/4 inch of leather, denim, etc. It can handle #69 thread and Bob at Toledo will tell you these are good machines to start out on while you save up for other machines. You're not going to saddles I assume, and I just sewed a guitar strap that was 7/8 oz veg tanned, foam, and 4/5 oz chrome tanned for backing. I couldn't even get the presser foot down completely. It just does what I want it to.

I have the one below for sale in a cabinet and another one that will be for sale after I rehab it (yeah, I kinda love and collect them). The one below is a centennial model, has the blue and red tag instead of just the brass one. So I want a little bit more for it. If you're interested pm me. Cheryl

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http://www.doubleccustomleather.com


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#9 Anne Bonnys Locker

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Posted 23 June 2012 - 03:01 AM

If the 7-33 is available for a couple of hundred bucks then buy it.

Use it to do repairs to horse rugs and heavy canvas. Whatever money you make from this can be put away toward a proper leather machine.
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#10 Wizcrafts

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Posted 23 June 2012 - 11:13 AM

But if you wer in my position, on a budget and knowing what you know now. What machine would you recommend that is versatile? Who wouldn't want to have 4 or 5 machines, but at the time the money ain't there.


I was in your position a few years ago, having divested myself of all of my previous equipment, starting over. The first machine I bought that could properly feed both leather and Naugahyde was a used triple feed walking foot machine. It paid for itself in one month.

My walking foot machine is no longer made, but is based on the design of the Consew 206RB and Chandler 406 models. It sewed up to 3/8 inch, and could handle up to #207 bonded nylon thread. I upgraded the motor to a special servo motor sold by Toledo Industrial Sewing Machines. This gave it the controllability at slow speeds I wanted, without losing punching power.

My machine is part of a class we call upholstery grade machines. Mine came from an upholstery and blinds shop. Walking foot flat bed machines are the staple of their industry, as they have positive feed of all layers, heavy springs, beefed up take-up and tensioning parts and bigger bearings and shafts than garment machines Still, I can sew wallet interiors on my machine, with a #16 needle and #69 thread. Change to a #23 needle and #138 thread and it will sew commercial rifle slings all day long.

So, if you are looking for starter machine and your work won't exceed 3/8 inch, or your thread doesn't exceed #207, one of these could be your first machine (with the proper Sew Slow servo).

Now, if you are planning on sewing beyond 3/8 inch, say up to 1/2 inch, you need to move up to the 45k clone machines: sold as the CB2500 and GA5-1R. They both can sew 7/16 inch out of the box, with #277 or even #346 thread. They have 10.5 inch long cylinder arms, rather than a flat bed and large bobbins. The trouble with them is they are bottom fed machines only. Yes, the foot bar can be raised higher inside the head, allowing you to place 1/2 inch of leather under the foot. But, will the pressure spring be able to keep the leather from lifting with the needle? It depends on the density of the leather and size of the needle and thread. Maybe yes, maybe no.

This type of machine sells for between $1,000 to $1400.

If you plan on repairing or making saddles, don't dink around. Save up and buy, or lease a 441 type machine. They now sew up to 7/8 inch, with up to #415 thread and come in cylinder arm lengths of 9, 16.5 and 25 inches. The motors feed triple 3:1 speed reducers. The total reduction is typically 8 or 9 to 1. Coupled with a 3/4 HP servo they punch through any leather. The springs are more than strong enough to hold down the leather as the needle ascends and they are triple feed.

The only issue they have sewing thin material is the huge feed dog, with a huge hole in it. Also, the harness feet work best on solid materials, rather than soft leather. Still, I have used mine to sew garment leather belts, zippers into leather jackets, chaps, shortened cuffs on jeans and purses needing repairs (w/ #19 needle and #92 thread). Then, by changing to a #25 needle, it can sew through 3/4 inch of bridle leather, with #277 thread. Toss in a #26 needle and it sews with #346 thread.

These machines range in price from about $2,000, up to about $3,300, depending on the length of the arm and what accessory package, if any, is purchased with the machine. I recommend buying one with the flat table attachment. This helps keep flat work flat and gives you a table surface you can rotate your material on as you sew different angles.

Edited by Wizcrafts, 23 June 2012 - 11:16 AM.

Posted IMHO, by Wiz





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