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Stropping On Which Side?


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#1 Curley Fryes

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Posted 11 September 2012 - 02:33 PM

Ok, now I'm confused. On Tandy's site, it you look up white Jewelers Rouge to buy, it says to rub it on the flesh side of the leather to strop. If you look at their instructions on how to make a stropping board, it says to use contact cement and glue the flesh side down on a piece of cardboard or wood. Well, which is it? Do you strop your swivel knife on the flesh side with Rouge or the grain side? Also, they said to soak it in honing oil first. Don't have any, what can I use as an alternative?
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#2 KAYAK45

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Posted 11 September 2012 - 02:39 PM

Glue the FLESH SIDE DOWN to a piece of wood, use rouge on the grain side and strop away. Oil, I think just gunks (tech term) it up.

There is a post in LEATHER TOOLS on here on the different color rouge and what they are good for.

I use green and gray.

Also SEVERAL great tutorial pins, same location. on sharpening.!

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#3 Chief31794

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Posted 11 September 2012 - 02:40 PM

I've always glued the flesh side to the board, no oil (my opinion), load with jewelers rouge, strop away. I have just as much success using the back of a note pad (cardboard), loading with jeweler's rouge and stroping on that, I also use the edge of the note pad back to strop edgers, works great. I have two on the bench made with leather and a couple of cardboard ones as well. i can't tell much difference. I use the leather on the board for round knife stropping, it just doesn't seem to feel right on the cardboard, swivel knives work on either. Just My Opinion.



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#4 HellfireJack

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Posted 11 September 2012 - 03:15 PM

People actually use both sides. It's just a matter of preference. I've used both myself.

#5 Curley Fryes

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Posted 12 September 2012 - 08:01 AM

Looks like I'll make a stropping board with both sides!
Fast is fine, but accuracy is final.....Wyatt Earp

#6 Sylvia

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Posted 12 September 2012 - 12:16 PM

Now, I'll really stuff you up. Some folks say to use cardboard because it is less likely to round over the corners of your swivel knife blades.
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#7 Rawhide

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Posted 21 September 2012 - 08:42 AM

I use neither flesh or grain side. I use the method Sylvia mentioned. You can use the leather, but I would be sure it's really thin. I use manilla folders and rub a green micro polish into it. The reason for the oil is that the jeweler's rouge that Tandy has is as hard as a brick, the oil breaks it down and makes it easier to apply to the leather. The green compound I use is already waxy and easy to rub into anything. I even use it on my cardboard sharpening wheels.
Marlon

#8 northmount

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Posted 21 September 2012 - 09:44 AM

A piece of MDF (medium density fiber) board works well too. The surface is very flat, firm. Lasts longer than cardboard. Very sturdy and supports sharpening guide helping to keep it straight. Has become my preferred method instead of leather.

CTG

Edited by northmount, 21 September 2012 - 09:45 AM.






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