Jump to content


Photo

New Tandy Swivel Knives

tandy swivel knife tools

  • Please log in to reply
27 replies to this topic

#1 JJs Leatherworks

JJs Leatherworks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 66 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Wildwood, Alberta, Canada
  • Interests:Rodeo, horse riding/training, all things western, flying (private pilot), photography
  • Leatherwork Specialty:Belts, tack
  • Interested in learning about:Making cases/portfolios,improving sewing machine technique, expanding color dyeing technique
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?:Leather machine company site link

Posted 18 January 2013 - 11:14 PM

Got an email from Tandy today, like happens every Friday, and their new line of tools is now available.
Included in the new offerings are their two new swivel knives with either 3/8" or 1/2" barrels.
Anyone got to see and touch these in real life yet?
Do you think they will be able to compare to the likes of Barry King swivel kinives?
Would like to know if they are going to be a suitable upgrade from their basic models. I won't be in a Tandy store for a while, so any early opinions will be appreciated.

JJ

#2 electrathon

electrathon

    Instructor

  • Contributing Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2,346 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Gresham, OR
  • Leatherwork Specialty:Floral

Posted 18 January 2013 - 11:41 PM

Looked at the new tools today. Bought two just to see. My impression is that compared to the other craft tools they are a huge step up. The crispness of the tools looks good. The machining looks fair. They are stainless. They are more than Barry King (at list price).

Overall, Barry King tools are nicer. If you get a discount the new tools are charper (these tools are virtually exact copies of Barrys tools, Chinese manufacturing flattery). If you want to buy from Tandy it is really awsome to finally have a usable choice of tooling tools.

#3 Cyberthrasher

Cyberthrasher

    Leatherworker.net Regular

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2,303 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Lewiston, Idaho
  • Interests:Shovelhead choppers and Blues Guitar
  • Leatherwork Specialty:Tooling, Guitar Straps, Wallets, Motorcycle accessories, etc...
  • Interested in learning about:Victorian and Figure carving, some more advanced coloring.

Posted 19 January 2013 - 12:36 AM

these tools are virtually exact copies of Barrys tools, Chinese manufacturing flattery


Does that include the stamping tools or were you just referring to the knives?

#4 electrathon

electrathon

    Instructor

  • Contributing Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2,346 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Gresham, OR
  • Leatherwork Specialty:Floral

Posted 19 January 2013 - 12:44 AM

Does that include the stamping tools or were you just referring to the knives?


I was refering to the tools. They look like someone bought a set of Barry King tools and copied them.

I like the look of the knife. Didn't try cutting with if so not sure how it fits in my hand. It looked pretty good though. I didn't see any info on metal alloy in the blade.

#5 Cyberthrasher

Cyberthrasher

    Leatherworker.net Regular

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2,303 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Lewiston, Idaho
  • Interests:Shovelhead choppers and Blues Guitar
  • Leatherwork Specialty:Tooling, Guitar Straps, Wallets, Motorcycle accessories, etc...
  • Interested in learning about:Victorian and Figure carving, some more advanced coloring.

Posted 19 January 2013 - 12:49 AM

When I looked, the prices on the knives weren't much better than Barry's, so I'd say stick to his unless you're a swivel knife addict (assuming they're made in China to the same standards we're used to). I don't really know what they're like though, so I think I'd just stick to a known product. I am however always on the lookout for various bevelers since that's about 90% of what I do. Made me go look at Barry's again though :)

#6 electrathon

electrathon

    Instructor

  • Contributing Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2,346 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Gresham, OR
  • Leatherwork Specialty:Floral

Posted 19 January 2013 - 01:07 AM

I am a tool addict. Not a drug addict and not an alcholic so I buy tools. Most of my tools are Barry King.

One advantage I personally have with these tools is I teach basic tooling at Tandy and it is nearly impossible to do floral tooling with the previous line of craft tools. This gives me the ability to have tools to teach with.

#7 Wishful

Wishful

    Leatherworker

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 638 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Southern Calif
  • Leatherwork Specialty:trying to figure that out...
  • Interested in learning about:techniques & Patterns
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?:google

Posted 19 January 2013 - 08:40 AM

I got the email too and although I know they were announced previously as high end, I was surprised at the price. I think they should have stepped up the quality of the "cheap" ones but charge a bit more. Personally, I will still look for the old craftools which can be had for much less than these new ones.

#8 electrathon

electrathon

    Instructor

  • Contributing Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2,346 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Gresham, OR
  • Leatherwork Specialty:Floral

Posted 19 January 2013 - 01:53 PM

I got the email too and although I know they were announced previously as high end, I was surprised at the price. I think they should have stepped up the quality of the "cheap" ones but charge a bit more. Personally, I will still look for the old craftools which can be had for much less than these new ones.


I have tro agree that the price is surprising. Chinese mass production being sold for the same price as American made small scale production. But, this is true for most of what Tandy sells. Tandy is convenient and many people do shop there. Almost all new leatherworkers start at Tandy.

The new tools are far superior in quality to any tools they have sold in the last 30 years. They are stainless and not nade out of crappy metal that it covered in chrome, muting the impressions. The huge differance is that they have modernized the shapes. They now have undercut tools that actually undercut. There is a leaf liner, center shader, thumbprint and so on that they have not previously sold. If you are using western floral tooling patterns from 50 years ago, you likely will not be affected by this. If you are tooling in a more modern Sheridan style (tighter, closer more busy) this is huge.

#9 ReneeCanady

ReneeCanady

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 462 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Delaware
  • Leatherwork Specialty:Leather mugs
  • Interested in learning about:Everything

Posted 19 January 2013 - 02:03 PM

I am only a year into leather work and mostly buy from Tandy because I don't know what is better. Glad to have read this post! Infact I was just cursing my Tandy swivel knife today. I wouldn't say I am good or bad using it, it just seems there has to be a better way. I find myself stropping more than carving. I thought about trying the ceramic blade but I just don't know what to buy lol. I don't want to invest a ton of money on 10 different swivel knives trying to find a good one when that money could be spent on leather. Infact, my husband bought me the huge tool set for Christmas last year and the blade they had in the swivel knife didn't even fit it, it didn't come with a pear shader, one of the bevelers were chipped etc..Sorry for running on and on.......<<<<<damn girls!

#10 electrathon

electrathon

    Instructor

  • Contributing Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2,346 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Gresham, OR
  • Leatherwork Specialty:Floral

Posted 19 January 2013 - 02:33 PM

because I don't know what is better.


Barry King Tools

I thought about trying the ceramic blade but I just don't know what to buy lol. I don't want to invest a ton of money on 10 different swivel knives trying to find a good one when that money could be spent on leather. Infact, my husband bought me the huge tool set for Christmas last year and the blade they had in the swivel knife didn't even fit it, it didn't come with a pear shader, one of the bevelers were chipped etc..Sorry for running on and on.......<<<<<damn girls!


Ceramic blades are very hard but are not truely sharp either. I tell people if they are not going to sharpen their knives, ceramic is good. If you are going to sharpen, quality steel is better.

If a Tandy tool is damaged, they are guarantied for life. Take it back and exchange it.

Running on is OK, I like girls.

#11 JJs Leatherworks

JJs Leatherworks

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 66 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Wildwood, Alberta, Canada
  • Interests:Rodeo, horse riding/training, all things western, flying (private pilot), photography
  • Leatherwork Specialty:Belts, tack
  • Interested in learning about:Making cases/portfolios,improving sewing machine technique, expanding color dyeing technique
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?:Leather machine company site link

Posted 19 January 2013 - 05:38 PM

I have tro agree that the price is surprising. Chinese mass production being sold for the same price as American made small scale production. But, this is true for most of what Tandy sells. Tandy is convenient and many people do shop there. Almost all new leatherworkers start at Tandy.

The new tools are far superior in quality to any tools they have sold in the last 30 years. They are stainless and not nade out of crappy metal that it covered in chrome, muting the impressions. The huge differance is that they have modernized the shapes. They now have undercut tools that actually undercut. There is a leaf liner, center shader, thumbprint and so on that they have not previously sold. If you are using western floral tooling patterns from 50 years ago, you likely will not be affected by this. If you are tooling in a more modern Sheridan style (tighter, closer more busy) this is huge.


That was the other thing I noticed, was the new shapes added to the Tandy collection. Like you, I am a bit of a tool addict (attracted to shiny things) as well, so am certain a few of them are going to end up in my collection.
Will probably ask to try out the swivel knives on my next visit to the store. I am curious as to the controllability differences between the two barrel diameters. Wondering which will feel better for real fine detail work.
There is no mention though, that the blades themselves are of any better quality ...

JJ

Edited by JJs Leatherworks, 19 January 2013 - 05:39 PM.


#12 electrathon

electrathon

    Instructor

  • Contributing Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2,346 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Gresham, OR
  • Leatherwork Specialty:Floral

Posted 19 January 2013 - 06:12 PM

I personally prefer smaller barrel knives. My hands are small (wear medium gloves) so they fit me. The blades are tapered and I am not sure of the metal alloys. As usual, this information is not available. If you are currently using a Tandy knife I think you will be in awe. The bearing in the top makes a huge differance. Most other knife makers have been using a top bearing for a long time, so if you are using a top end knife I am guessing it would be a sideways step.

#13 ReneeCanady

ReneeCanady

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 462 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Delaware
  • Leatherwork Specialty:Leather mugs
  • Interested in learning about:Everything

Posted 20 January 2013 - 04:22 AM

Thanks, I will check out the site!

#14 lightningad

lightningad

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 352 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:oldham, uk
  • Interests:life, the universe, everything....except football.

    stopframe animating is another hobby of mine.
  • Leatherwork Specialty:wallets, journal covers, pouches, bags
  • Interested in learning about:all things leathery
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?:google

Posted 20 January 2013 - 06:07 AM

maybe i was lucky, but the swivel knife that came in my Tandy kit seems fine to me.

I have never used one before, but after spending a while honing and stropping it when i first got it, it seems to cut well. I have done quite a few cuts this past year, and my technique has improved with every project, the knife has given no hints that its dodgy.

Please could someone explain what it is about these Tandy knives that people seem to have problems with? I'm keen to know if a more costly knife would improve anything for me.
"You is what you am, a cow don't make ham!"
Frank Zappa - Musical Visionary

Barking Rooster Leather Goods


Pinterest Page

#15 TwinOaks

TwinOaks

    Ambassador

  • Ambassador
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3,939 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Mobile, Al.
  • Interests:all of it.
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?:Yellow Pages :)

Posted 20 January 2013 - 10:43 AM

The issue with most of the 'standard' knives is that they use a "cup on a point" - pull one apart and you'll see what I mean- and over time, the knife can/will develop a "less than smooth" feel to it. It's not just the blade, it's the yoke as well. A good bearing supported yoke will allow the knife to turn with no added resistance or choppy feeling from the yoke. To give an example, I can hold one of my tandy knives by the blade and lightly thump the yoke....it might go ONE full revolution. I do the same thing to a bearing supported yoke (different knife obviously) and it spins for just under 10 seconds. Completely free spinning. Heck, I can blow on the yoke and it'll turn....it's so much smoother that you really do have to feel it to understand it.
Mike DeLoach

Esse Quam Videri (Be rather than Seem)
"Don't learn the tricks of the trade.....Learn the trade."
"Teach what you know......Learn what you don't."

LEATHER ARTISAN'S DIGITAL GUILD on Facebook.





Similar Topics Collapse


Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: tandy, swivel knife, tools

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users