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Here we go. saddle tree test. Carbon fiber verses hide


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#61 Alan Bell

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Posted 13 December 2008 - 08:48 AM

Mort, This is the problem that you are having and that you are now trying to pass on to others that to my estimation have gone above and beyond in their effort to help and guide you with their experience and knowledge. in your last post you stated "Threw my studies I have found very few people have taken the time as I have to learn about the horse and the saddle." You think you know! Well I can assure you that is certainly not the case! AS a matter of fact the opposite is true and QUITE A FEW people have taken the time to learn about the horse and saddle! (and some of them can spell) (LORD, I apologize!) So now I would ask you to quantify your vast studies. How many years have you been studying this issue? How many horses have you studied? How many different breeds? How many different types? How many different types of saddles? I know you can not be exact (unless the numbers are quite small) but just give rough estimations. Hopefully we are not all wrapped up in this deal over you trying to fit this ONE horse! Many on here are lifelong horsemen and makers some have 20 + yrs as gear makers. Some of us still get horseback too and not just logging time but actually wrangling livestock which is what the Western Saddle you are finding so many flaws with was actually designed to do. You should probably be looking towards a top end ENDURANCE saddle. (You probably already knew that because of the time you've taken to study and learn) It's hard to add to a glass that is already full!
Vaya con Dios, Alan Bell

#62 greg gomersall

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Posted 13 December 2008 - 10:01 AM

Mort, This is the problem that you are having and that you are now trying to pass on to others that to my estimation have gone above and beyond in their effort to help and guide you with their experience and knowledge. in your last post you stated "Threw my studies I have found very few people have taken the time as I have to learn about the horse and the saddle." You think you know! Well I can assure you that is certainly not the case! AS a matter of fact the opposite is true and QUITE A FEW people have taken the time to learn about the horse and saddle! (and some of them can spell) (LORD, I apologize!) So now I would ask you to quantify your vast studies. How many years have you been studying this issue? How many horses have you studied? How many different breeds? How many different types? How many different types of saddles? I know you can not be exact (unless the numbers are quite small) but just give rough estimations. Hopefully we are not all wrapped up in this deal over you trying to fit this ONE horse! Many on here are lifelong horsemen and makers some have 20 + yrs as gear makers. Some of us still get horseback too and not just logging time but actually wrangling livestock which is what the Western Saddle you are finding so many flaws with was actually designed to do. You should probably be looking towards a top end ENDURANCE saddle. (You probably already knew that because of the time you've taken to study and learn) It's hard to add to a glass that is already full!
Vaya con Dios, Alan Bell




Mort Alan is right take the glass and have a few long slow swallows. greg

#63 Alan Bell

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Posted 13 December 2008 - 11:29 AM

Hey Mort, I just thought of another thing. Your horse or any horse for that matter should not "drop his rear" when you saddle up. I'm not even sure what that means but I imagine that the horse is basically trying to dodge the weight of the saddle and since your saddle does not appear to be very heavy I would guess (from my years of learning about horses and saddles) that your horse has some sort of chiropractic issues and is trying to tell you of this in the only language the horse has. Part of this may have been created by not having a saddle that fits properly and how you sit the saddle can be a contributing factor. Also, when riding on endurance trails over varied terrain how you transverse certain areas can affect this too. The horse will generally give the human its all even when contrary to the horses well being and will do things like lope on the wrong lead when going along a trail that is sideways to a up and down hill and throw its shoulder or hip out just because its rider set it up on the wrong lead. It may have tossed its head or swished its tail and the rider ignored these signals and asked the horse and the horse complied. Not saying you did this just giving examples. If my horses do not stand rock solid for saddling and mounting (I do not like to HAVE to tie a horse to a rail or a hitching post to saddle up) then there is something my horse is trying to tell me. It may just want to hang out with its pasture mates or it may actually have a physical ailment and it is MY JOB to determine what my horse is saying and to respond in the correct manner. Anyways, it may be that no matter the saddle your horse may have other issues that need to be addressed. Just something to consider "for the horse".
Vaya Con Dios, Alan Bell

#64 SITTINGUPHIGH1

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Posted 14 December 2008 - 03:24 AM

I hope your party went will Alan. Cheers.

#65 greg gomersall

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Posted 14 December 2008 - 08:14 AM

I hope your party went will Alan. Cheers.





Mort it was not Alan that was having the party it was Steve. If you would take the time to read the posts you might be able to understand the information everybody has been kind enough to try to relay to you. Greg

#66 rickybobby

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Posted 14 December 2008 - 11:56 AM

Yes Greg horses do change as weight changes and there age. That brings up one of the problems with classical western saddle. There to unflexiable to these changes. I don't think the flexiable tree is the answer. Nether is padding up a horse. I feel a some kind of flexiable padding under the sheep skin may solve that problem. It would be finding the right meterial. Althought if a horse changes to much you have to change the saddle tree. Having saddles that the saddle tree can be changed fairly easy would be a plus.

Threw my studies I have found very few people have taken the time as I have to learn about the horse and the saddle. There is very little information out there. You have to piece it together your self. The more I have learned the more I see to learn and discover. Never ending.


Rick

#67 oldtimer

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Posted 14 December 2008 - 01:53 PM

Mort it was not Alan that was having the party it was Steve. If you would take the time to read the posts you might be able to understand the information everybody has been kind enough to try to relay to you. Greg

:thumbsup: / Knut
"The gun fight at the O.K. corral was actually started by two saddlemakers sitting around a bottle of whiskey talking about saddle fitting"...

#68 Saddlebag

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Posted 30 July 2013 - 08:54 AM

Saddle trees date way back to the time of Genghis Khan. His soldiers carried three trees to accommodate the shape of their ponies from spring fat to late fall when they were lean and hard. Carbon fiber is used in higher end fishing rods which have to have flex and strength. I can't see that a carbon fiber tree would be worse than a Ralide the the pro would be it's light weight and strength. As we get older saddles seem to get heavier, especially for women, and there's a huge market for 50+ riders.





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