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About bdt46

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  • Birthday 11/16/1946

Profile Information

  • Gender
  • Location
    Dewey, Okla.
  • Interests
    Anything dealing with leather or leather equiptment

LW Info

  • Leatherwork Specialty
  • Interested in learning about
    anything leather
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  1. Lots of 12" x 16" pieces of approx. 3 oz. leather. Mostly red, tan, turquoise and gray. I will sell 25 pieces of assorted colors(my choice, but will mix them up) for $20.00 plus $23.00 shipping on 1-3 day USPS priority shipping. There is approx. 32.5 sq. ft. in each box making it cost you $1.72 each piece or $1.33 per square foot. Great for craft people or linings for smaller projects. I accept Pay Pal, check or USPS m.o. Items will ship the day after payment is made or the day after check or m.o. clears. Message me at BLUE MOUND SADDLERY on FaceBook or call the shop 918-886-3500. Email at
  2. If you are talking about BATIE saddle trees in Welch, OK., I was just by there a couple of weeks ago and looked like they were going as fast as they could! They had lots of trees in various stages of construction.
  3. Thanks a lot Chris! Hope I can return the favor someday!
  4. MuleFool, if it is not spoken for yet I would like to have it! Blue Mound Saddlery-11801 N. 4010 Rd. Dewey, OK. 74029
  5. I can't see where it was made, but could have been made by Baldo Hill, who had a shop West of Chandler, Ok. Baldo Hill was the son of saddle maker, Onofre Hill. Ono Had a shop at Bartlesville, Ok. until his death in the mid 80's. Baldo had been at Chandler from the early 1960's until the last time I saw him in about 2002. Don't know if he still has a shop or if he is still with us. Reason I know about him is I apprenticed under his father, Ono, in the mid 1960's. Hope this might help. Also if you would post full pictures of the saddle I could probably tell.
  6. Why don't you call a tannery, and talk to them about your needs and how you want the leather to perform. They will know exactly what you need to do and the feasibility of your project. They will also give you pricing, minimum quantities, etc. I would think this would be the easiest way to get all your answers from people who know
  7. If you will get Osbourne spring punches and don't try to muscle the punch through, but rotate it back and forth as you squeeze, they will punch the leather easily! I have a set of Osborne spring punches that I had over 40 years and they still punch through saddle skirting with ease. Just an occasional light sharpening keeps them working great. I have never even had to replace a tube!
  8. I don't know how old yours are, but I have a pair like them that I've had for 45 years, and mine were pretty old when I got them. I think mine say R. Timmons and Sons, with a large no.3, and "warranted steel hammer" located on the hammer part. Some further research might give some more information. I got mine from the Saddle Maker that I apprenticed under and he was in his 80's at that time. Instead of pincers or lasting pincers, he said saddle makers always called them "Bull Pliers", and I think I visually know why!
  9. It looks like you have a part missing as there should be another bent rod below the thread looper that the thread should run through. We need some better photos from different angles to be sure. Parts are almost non existent for these old machines unless you can find one for parts. Cowboy Bob may have some parts hid out as I think he has one of the old machines for sale. He is one of the vendors on this sight!
  10. Ihave to agree with you guys about the grease and oil and chipped paint! First of all to me that gives a piece of equipment some character. All of my old equipment have been used by me for over 40 years and all look like they have been used but are in A-1 shape. My old Landis 3 and Landis 16 stitchers need paint but I don't think it would make them sew any better. My old 5 in 1 and splitters and other machines have been great pardners over the years and look their age like their owner, but are used flawlessly 6 days a week! It seems to me that it is always the beginners and part-timers that want to tell you what your machinery is worth, while most don't have enough to even call a shop. Guess I'll just hang on to my old stuff before I let amatuers set the price of their worth! Just my 2 cents worth!
  11. You need to resize your images! I can't make heads or tails of what your trying to show!
  12. That looks like a parachute quick release latch. You can look them up on the internet for suppliers, and they cost about 25 or 30 dollars each. They are usually sold in two separate pieces that total that amount!
  13. MadSaddler, if I were you I'd be mad too! After 44 years in the saddlery business, I'm having as bad a year in my shop as I've ever had. The liberals who get GRANT MONEY from taxes others have had to work hard for and pay, are always the first to take up for out of control Government spending. I've never had one thing handed to me and have worked for the little I do have. People who are given a start, can walk away when they are ready and can just shut the door and forget about how hard they had to struggle to make a business work! I guess our President was talking only about himself when he said no one made their own business! I just wonder how he can say that when he has never been in the business world as the owner of anything that I know of. You would think people would quit whipping on Bush, oh, I forgot OBAMA has only had 3 1/2 years to turn things around! At the rate we are going you will not be the only shops going out of business. I sympathize and feel for you, just know you are not alone! You said it all though!!!!!!!!
  14. Sounds to me like you have a clutch motor that needs the brake adjusted. There should be about a 1/2 inch bolt on the end of the motor with a lock nut. Loosen the lock nut and turn the bolt and it will adjust the travel and brake in the clutch. When you push down with your heel on the treadle it should lock the brake stopping the motor and machine. When the adjustment suits you lock the nut again and continue sewing.
  15. If your sewing machine is compatible, you should get a roller foot for it. That will make it a lot easier to stitch around the curved areas and follow an even border. I think it would look a lot better with larger thread also.