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About shooter55

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  • Birthday November 9

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    Northern Ohio

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  • Leatherwork Specialty
    Holsters and CCW Belts
  1. No. SPF means "Sold Pending Funds". Funds provided. It's gone. Sorry for not updating.
  2. Brand New Cowboy 3200 for sale. This is an extra machine that I purchased for a back-up to my CB4500, but can't say I think I'll ever need it. Will not ship, so you have to be in general area, or willing to take a road trip. My location is 30 mlles due west of Cleveland, OH. $1195.00 FIRM. If you want to save a little on a brand new machine, this is your opportunity. E-mail for questions. (
  3. Before you commit to buying a Tippmann, check with Bob at Toledo Industrial Sewing machine. (Cowboy Bob here on the forum) He has a new model CB3200 for $1595 and it does almost as much as the CB 4500. I have them both and they work great. Just remember that with a Boss, every stitch means a downward motion using your hand and arm. Lot of up and down for a belt…….. No, I am not affiliated with Bob, but did stay at a Motel 6 the other night…..or was that a Holiday Inn????
  4. "What do you guys think about stitching around the belt slots?" MDH, Have done them in the past by hand and machine. Not as a general rule though. As Dwight says, "adds to the look" , but if glued and burnished correctly, should not separate.
  5. Very nice job. To chime in with Eaglestroker, it really does help when you pre-contour for the fit. My method is after it is molded and ready to dry, with the blue gun still in the holster, I take a piece of wood 1 ½" wide, ¼" thick and about 12" long and run to through both loops. I then press the wings flat against the wood where it is inserted. It will dry with a natural curve that fits the side a little better for break-in. I have a personal preference to double stitch around the gun, but single is OK too. If this is your first holster, you're on the way to being a pretty good maker. Looks like you pay attention to detail. Keep it up.
  6. Red....Do you dial that RPM down some way on your B&D? 3600 seems pretty fast to burnish an edge. Ever burn any edges? Just curious.
  7. QuickBooks here. Like the reporting system. Never a problem.
  8. I'm not an expert on tooling (as many here are), but I believe the leather quality may have something to do with the issue. It also looks like the knife is "dragging" and pulling the leather instead of cutting clean, which can be caused by trying to cut too deep. If your knife is truly sharp, it really takes minimal effort to cut a good line. You shouldn't have to exert a lot of pressure. The knife need to be perpendicular to the leather when doing this also. That will "bend" one side of the cut if you don't. The casing could be too wet, which can also make for a sloppy cut. I'm sure someone here will identify what you are doing that is causing your problem. Don't be discouraged as we all had to start the same way you are. The biggest difference, is you have the benefit of truly talented artisans helping you here. (myself not included). Have fun....
  9. Still some time at the machine. Looks great.
  10. I see a few hours of hand-stitching there. Very nice job.
  11. Made one for a customer a while ago. Makes the holster wider, but apparently fits him OK.
  12. I lay mine in the driveway and run over them with my truck. Also embosses with tread marks at the same time.......NO, not really. I also use a laminate roller. Don't use a sledge when a tack hammer will do. If glued properly, that and the stitching will create very strong bond. Tim
  13. Very nice work Seth. Are you stamping or carving? Either way, looks pretty good. Do you do a lot of saddlery in LA? (not to be confused with Lower Alabama or Los Angeles) Have some friends in Shreveport and the only horses they are familiar with are 390 if them under the hood. Nice work. Tim