veedub3

Members
  • Content count

    521
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About veedub3

  • Rank
    Leatherworker

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Female
  • Location
    Panama City, Panama/Atlanta, GA
  • Interests
    Leather working, traveling, reading, learning new things, and anything pertaining to water.

LW Info

  • Leatherwork Specialty
    Newbie to the world of Leather
  • Interested in learning about
    All things pertaining to leather working!
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?
    Google Search for Leather working forums
  1. Computer Templates

    I use a Vector Program Corel Draw or Illustrator to design my templates. Not free and they both have somewhat of a steep learning curve, but Inkscape is very similar and is Free. Plenty of tutorials on Youtube that will get you up and going. Karina
  2. Tandy leather has SB Foot overruns

    Waited for red shirt Wednesday so I could also get my $5 off and ended up buying 4 sides. Nice stuff. Karina
  3. DIY Hot Leather Stamp

    Here are a couple of threads, maybe reach out to them to see if they can point you in the right direction. There is another thread that I know of on here but for the life of me I can't find it. I also think he started selling the unit, but he did go through what he did to accomplish it.
  4. I have been looking at this machine for about 4 years now and still have not pulled the plug on it. At the time when I first started researching it the price was over $800, now on Ebay they are half that. Over on the CNCZONE forum they have a section that is dedicated to these units with all the different mods and upgrades to turn this unit into a great little laser cutter, plus you can get answers to any newbie questions you may have or problems you may run into. @electrathon it will be interesting to see how you get yours going and the issues (if any) you run into. If the build goes well I may go ahead and grab one. I have an X-Carve CNC machine and a company called J Tech has a laser cutter attachment for my CNC machine, I was leaning that way, but if things goes well with your set up, I might just rethink adding a laser to my CNC and get a separate unit, that way I can CNC and Laser cut/engrave at the same time instead of tying up my machine and have to wait until one is finished. Karina
  5. Jokes 'n' stuff

    This type of set up works well for me. My products are currently in 9 Brick and Mortar stores around the US. They are called Stockist.(If this is who you are referring to) Yes they pay a discounted price for my items, but they buy in bulk and pay upfront. I get a fair price for the discounted item because the item is priced to where I am happy with the deal, but once it is theirs, they can do what they want with it - not my issue anymore unless it hurts the brand. This works out well for me because I would never be able to sell that much volume on my own. I have no real web presence and I hate Social Media. Facebook needs to be pushed off the nearest cliff (along with fidget spinners but that is a rant for another day.) I do use Instagram but I rarely post - maybe once or twice every few months and to get followers you need to be posting 3 to 4 times a day unless you buy followers and I just don't have the time nor the interest in doing that. I did hire a person to do the Social Media work for me on a 6 months trial period, and although followers and sales increased, it was not even a fraction of the sales I get from placing my items with Stockist. My joy is in making the product, all the work I have to put into photographing the item, writing blurbs about the item, advertising, marketing, and social media, is like a second job all in itself, and I am simply not a fan of that - so I chose the Stockist route when it was presented to me. They buy the item from me and they do all the work to sell it - or not - either way, I have already been paid. The products placed in these stores are small leather goods, no weekenders, satchels, messengers, or totes - those along with other leather goods I sell at pop up shops around Atlanta. For a large established brand, I am sure this makes no since at all, but for a small shop such as mine, it is a great way to get your product in front of people you may not be able to otherwise. It may not be worth it to everyone, but for me it is the perfect set-up. Karina
  6. aluminum embossing plate prototype

    Looks great! I have to say I too have broken several bits milling aluminum and brass. Karina
  7. stitching chisel set

    I just purchased a set of these in two different sizes. They haven't arrive yet but they were so cheap I thought....why not? I got mine from this Ebay seller and they are dirt cheap. http://www.ebay.com/itm/331720984663?_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649&var=540835348130&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT The 3mm 4 piece set was $5.99. Glad to see they aren't crap! Karina
  8. Mock credit cards for product photos

    I get credit cards in the mail often - they are solicitations to open credit card/loan accounts. They have no real information on them and are perfect for this. I also reuse the cards that are no longer valid/expired. For example the bank just finally changed my debit cards to chip cards, so the old ones will be added to my collection for taking pictures of wallets and such. You can also use your grocery store card, library card, auto parts card, movie rental card, basically any discount card, they will all work. Karina
  9. Laser cut acrylic stamp

    Makerspaces are a great resource. As for the stamp, I would use delrin or hdpe, both are cheap and will hold up to many, many impressions. Not sure about acrylic. Karina
  10. Cork Duck Tape

    I have always used this adhesive backed cork from the hobby store and it has worked awesome so far. http://www.hobbylobby.com/Crafts-Hobbies/Painting-Surfaces/Cork/12-Natural-Cork-Roll-With-Adhesive/p/28806 Karina
  11. Metal dowel for Burnisher

    Glad you now know which direction you wish to head in, but just a bit of clarification on the carriage bolt. The photo shows the type of bolt I was referring to. After chopping off the head of the bolt, and smoothing the ruff edges on a sander, that would be the part chucked into your drill press - so no threads getting crushed over time. The part with the threads will be the part epoxied into the wood.
  12. Metal dowel for Burnisher

    Very good suggestions above, and I have done them all. I have made several versions of DIY wood burnishers over the years. I have sacrificed a drill bit and epoxied it in place. On my very first one, I just hammered in a nail and put it in a drill chuck attached to my adjustable grinder. Didn't even use glue on that one, the wood was so dense, I would destroy the burnisher trying to get the nail out. I made one for a friend once, I just stopped into a hardware store and picked up some metal rod and cut it down to size with my Dremel. Another one, I just cut the head off a carriage bolt and epoxied it in place. Plenty of ways to get it done. Karina
  13. I apply my stain using an airbrush. Actually, using an airbrush is how I dye all my leather. With the airbrush i had to go over it several times to get the nice even color that I wanted. Once dry, the color came out a very dark brown. The husks i was using were from a black walnut tree, and I was told that the fresher they are, the darker the stain will be. I was able to get my husk the same day they fell from the tree. When cracking them open, i didn't wear gloves and my fingers were stained black for days.
  14. I have, but from the walnut husks, although I hear you can make it from the walnut shells as well. I found this method on one of the blade or bushwhack forums, I forget which one, but you can hit up google and will find many ways of doing it. With the husks (I used black walnut), put them in a pot, cover with water and bring to a boil, once at boil, reduce heat and start your clock. It needs to cook for about 1 hour. After starting your clock, you will stir every 10 minutes. At about the 30 minutes mark, remove the husks. Let the mixture continue to cook for the remaining time, stirring every 10 minutes. Once done, strain the liquid using a cheese cloth. I did this several times to get all the bits and pieces out of the dye. Once the mixture has completely cooled, (I waited until the next day) Use as you would any other leather dye. My batch produced a a dark stain, closely similar to a Fiebing's Dark Brown dye. YMMV Also this can be done using pecans husks for a lighter shade of brown with hints of red tones. Hope this helps, Karina
  15. Wood and Leather Satchel

    This should help you out as well if you choose to make one. Nice bag @SmokeCigars Karina