chrstn53

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About chrstn53

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  1. The comparison between Cordovan and HF or butt strips stops after the fact that they all come from a horse. Ive used heavyweight veg tanned butt strips and really like working with it. I absolutely love working with Horween's Dublin Horse Fronts in the 3/4 ounce weight. At that weight I make most of my card cases and one of my wallets. I hand sew most of my smaller items and the Dublin HF is easy to sew, easy to finish the edges, looks great, smells amazing and patinas well. I work with many different leathers (H.O., W&C, Horween, Thoroughbred) and the occasional hides I pick up at auctions, but the Dublin HF from Horween is my favorite leather to work with.
  2. Companies that ship in large volume ship large and heavy boxes for prices you wouldn't believe. The biggest cost SLC was eating is the cost of labor to package everything up and the cost of shipping materials. I grabbed a beer with my favorite rep the last time I went to pick out my leather and we discussed shipping charges. A few weeks before Christmas I needed three sides of 6-7 ounce leather to make some bags and I did not have the time to make the trip to the tannery. He shipped the three sides for free Fed-ex, so when we talked about shipping charges I asked him how much it cost to ship those three sides and he told me it cost about $12. They ship a ton of leather so they get great rates and that was a heavy ass box. With SLC I noticed a huge price increase on a few things I get from them when they started offering the free shipping deal. I used to buy the 20 pound box of Veg Tanned Horse Scraps for $30 and after the free shipping went into effect, the price went up to $55. Most of the other small things I order went up slightly but not enough for me to quit buying them like the horse strips.
  3. A sealed letter mailed to yourself might hold up for something in small claims court, but I could not see it holding up in any higher court unless the other guy has very poor representation. I could see it working if all possible openings are sealed with security coded evidence tape and notarized by an actual official at the court house. Even if you do all of this and someone steals your idea and patents it, you would still have a hard time proving the other party stole it.
  4. Save yourself some time from the get go and do a thorough patent search. Back when I was in school I spent a fair amount of time on patent law in my business law class. The professor specialized in Patent law and stated that about 90% of the ideas that walked in his office had already been patented one or more times. He would tell us about all of these crazy things that people would come up with that seemed unique, but there would already be a patent on the creation or some major function of the creation. According to my professor a big portion of the patents have never been produced and that there are people/companies who do nothing but file patents for everything they come up with in hopes that down the road someone will buy the idea. The plus side is that if your idea is already patented and you can improve the designs function you might still have a shot.
  5. cloehorse the only other place I know to buy Jeremiah Watt tools is from his website. http://www.ranch2arena.com/home.html The website is a little difficult to navigate, but his tools (except for the quick change edger) sell for the same price as the wholesale price from Weaver. I'm not sure about the hardware, but I did see that he gives bulk discounts
  6. If your just making a pair of boots for yourself, you only need a handful of tools, a good pair of lasts, a pattern and a lot of time. A sewing machine would be helpful, but I know a few people who still completely hand-stitch the footwear they make. You could probably choose a simple design like a chukka boot for your first pair and move up from there. The machines just cut down your work time by 80% allowing you to sell your product at a reasonable price. Be prepared to put in 50 hours of tedious work if you are going to make them by hand..
  7. Good machines but a pretty tough sale these days. One sold in good working order at a leather equipment and tool auction I was at about 6 months ago for around $300. The old machines don't go for what they did several years ago, just look at the sale prices from the Whitman leather auction at the end of last year.
  8. Moleskine makes identical size notebooks and you can usually find them at Barnes and Nobles if you have one
  9. The notebooks are 3.5" x 5.5" There are several companies who make the same style and size
  10. PM Sent
  11. The tool on the left is a fudge wheel used to lay down a design on the welt. The other three are glazing irons and the Blanchard is an overstitch wheel but it is missing some parts.
  12. There is an Amish outfit on the east coast that makes this same style machine. I picked mine up at an auction and it works beautifully and will outlast me by hundreds of years. I believe the maker was byler.
  13. I'll take all 4 dies
  14. Chuck Smith makes some good swivel knives and he would be in the middle of the road between the two makers you mentioned at the $100 range
  15. Krominix, Who makes the leather at the bottom of the link (black front with tan back) Thanks