Sunnyside Scott

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About Sunnyside Scott

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    Member

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  • Website URL
    http://sunrisetacticalgear.com

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Washington State
  • Interests
    Long range tactical shooting and Sewing

LW Info

  • Interested in learning about
    Machines and build techniques
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?
    Google search different machine problems.

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  1. It looks like the only adjustment is from the hole on the back of the machine, although I didn't tip my machine back to find the clamp that Eric mentioned.
  2. I had a 562 and upgraded to the 1508n about 3 years ago, it was a great move going from size G bobbins to size U, you won't regret it. Scott
  3. Take your bobbin out to verify that you don't have a piece of thread stick in that area. Scott
  4. It looks like your head is threaded wrong, check out your shiny round thing with the fine loop spring, my guess is that your thread is on the inboard side of the thread path. Scott
  5. Re check your thread path, something may have pulled your thread out of the upper tension discs. Ensure that your bottom thread is under the tension spring, after you draw your bottom thread up through the feed dog as normal, hold your bobbin with one finger and pull on the bottom thread with the other hand. This should seat the bottom thread under the tension spring. Scott
  6. I contacted them a few months ago for some special presser feet, and was having email back and forth, when I asked about how to pay them, things went quiet. I'm not sure if I was working with the "wrong" guy or what. They must have passed my email off, because now I'm getting spammed by Chinese suppliers. I'm curious to hear if there is any updates. Scott
  7. I'm also interested to know more about a synchronized binder for a flatbed machine. I currently have a Juki 1508 with multiple slide plates set up with different 90 degree binder attachments, but it sometimes falls short on inside curves. Scott
  8. I had a " used Juki 562" that I purchased off of Craigslist. It will sew thin leather but the main problem is the small bobbin size, that will get old quick, I have purchased a hand full of used machines in the past and one thing that I have learned is that if the seller says that it needs "timed" it's normally more than that and I have to deduct $200 because that what I figure the minumum it will take for a professional to get it running. I sold my 562 for $500 in perfect working order, if that helps you base your price. Scott
  9. I had a Juki 562, it is a good machine but it has a small bobbin (size G) and always seems to run out of thread when you need it the most. $1,000 is too much for a used machine, as you can get a used Juki 563 for the same amount, it has a huge bobbin ( size U). Size is everything when it comes to bobbins, most Used walking foot sewing machines in that price range will have a size M, which is the smallest size that you want. I don't want to sound pushy, but I went down that road before I knew better and will never make that mistake again. Scott
  10. I have purchased a new and used machine from him in the past year. Great comminucation and great packaging for shipment. I will buy from him again. Scott
  11. So I did contact one of the Forum advertisers and discussed the Techsew 2800 and the Pfaff 335G, the person I talked to told me that the 2800 has a G sized bobbin and the Pfaff has a large bobbin, but he didn't think it was an M style. Using the Thread Exchange's bobbin sizing chart I found some interesting information. Pfaff 335 is a H size bobbin Consew RBFS is a L sized bobbin Conew 227r is a G sized bobbin All of these sizes are similar to G size and are not even close to an M size, so my search goes on, and I might even have to step up to one of the big saddle stitchers. At the end of the day, want a machine that has good parts support and I can get 90 degree binder attachments and feet at a reasonable price. The search goes on. Scott
  12. I'll start off by by saying that I don't sew leather, but I use walking foot sewing machines to build nylon tactical gear. My sewing machine A.D.D. is kicking in and I'm in the hunt for a cylinder arm machine with a vibrating binder. As I understand it, the binder moves with the needle so it helps with odd shaped products. I am currently using a flatbed machine with 90 degree binders. The machines I have seen are the Pfaff 335 and Consew 227R. I use 3/4 and 1" binding tape and webbing on the edges of some of my products. I currently have a standard cylinder arm, Consew 227R but it frustrates the sh!t out me because it uses a G sized bobbin, which always seems to run out just as you get going. So I would really like a size M or larger bobbin and I want to make sure it can handle multiple layers of Cordura and webbing, my build ups can be around 3/8"-1/2". Can someone point me in the right direction, also give me some insight on what the factories use? Thanks Scott
  13. I would be interested in finding a brushless motor with the most torque with 115 volt input power. I currently have both styles but am looking for another brushless motor, possibly with needle positioner. Thanks guys
  14. Very close to what I do. I use a walking foot machine using a #21 needle and #69 bonded nylon thread ( because thats what I build all my gear with). I use sail tape ( a 3/8" double sided tape that doesn't stick to the needle) to hold my first roll then I chalk a line on the outside that I use as a guide for my second roll. I start sewing on the inside of the leg behind the thick seam, to better hide my start and stop. I use a guide made out of a strip of 1/4" foam attached to my machine using the same double sided tape. This method works like a champ and I have never had a seam failure. Scott
  15. I'm a little late to this topic but I have recently went down the bartacker road. This Spring I picked up a Used Juki 980, 42 stitch tacker with a standard clamp, and an adjustable stitch width from 8-16mm. It was in such great shape I just couldn't pass it up. I quickly realized that for my work I needed a 20-22mm stitch, so I called Camatron and asked about re-caming the machine. I forget the exact numbers but it was around $1,000 for the parts alone and around $1900 if I sent in my machine to him for installation. He did not recommend spending that kind of money on that machine but suggested an electronic bartacker. A few weeks ago I received my new/used Juki 1900AHS bartacker with North/South feet, giving me the ability to pick from 28-56 stitch tack that can be scaled from 20mm. I sold the 980 machine, and will never look back, I build Military type gear and this machine is a perfect fit in my small shop. The stitch you posted looks real similar to the 42 stitch bartack of the Juki. Scott