billybopp

Members
  • Content count

    1,047
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About billybopp

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Pennsylvania, USA

LW Info

  • Leatherwork Specialty
    Strap goods, cases, etc.
  • Interested in learning about
    There is always more to learn.
  • How did you find leatherworker.net?
    Recommendation

Recent Profile Visitors

5,588 profile views
  1. New Project in progress: Music Case

    Lookin' good so far! Bill
  2. White paint and black antique... how is it done?

    I haven't tried Angelus, but do use Fiebings. Bill
  3. Recommended Leather Suppliers (US)

    Looks like you've got it essentially correct, Elizabeth. There are indeed some sellers that sell first quality HO and Horween, but there's a bit of research to find out who's who in that respect. I would add that Tandy announced a few days ago via their YouTube channel that they are now carrying in stores Sedgwick in black, brown and chestnut. It has yet to show up on their website, and I have not yet made it to the local shop to confirm that. Being Tandy, however, I suspect that they will be asking top dollar for it and I'd be sure to check the quality - It wouldn't be unusual for them to charge the highest prices for second quality. Bill
  4. White paint and black antique... how is it done?

    eco-flo antique gel is notorious for penetrating through most finishes used as a resist.
  5. New Project in progress: Music Case

    Many leather workers, unlike regular folk, do not realize that most Band-Aids paper wrappers eventually begin to brown with age. Check your regular friends medicine cabinet/first aid kits and you'll find this out. You see, leather, wood, and metal workers cut and stab themselves with alarming regularity. Regular folk don't do that! Imagine that!
  6. Helloooooooo

    Love that color!
  7. New Project in progress: Music Case

    It aint a REAL project until ya bleed on it a lil.
  8. Advice on a skiving tool please

    I don't know about plane blades, but I had an old set of wood chisels that I re-purposed by re-profiling the blade, and they are the best end-skivers I have - I'm able to get the scary sharp and they work great. The only complaint is that the handles are a bit heavy - I may eventually just cut them off and keep just the blade part. I suspect that a plane blade might work just as well - but I would suggest doing some work to change the angle from a plane's standard 25degrees to something considerably shallower - It may take some elbow-grease, but will probably be well worthwhile. Bill
  9. Best of various types of finished edges

    Check out Bob Park's pinned post here on LWN, .Be sure to read (and even download) the PDF in the initial post It's as good a tutorial on edge finishing veg tanned that you'll find. There are a lot of variations, but the principals are there. A lot of it depends on personal preference and the look that you are going for. It doesn't take much water to do the initial burnish, just a lightly damp sponge works nicely. Sometimes, on small pieces, I'll just lick my finger and slick with a little spit (don't tell anybody, but I know there are others that do that too)! Dying edges can be a little tricky, and again depends on what you are looking for. Edges can soak up a lot of dye, get really dark, and even bleed to the front of your leather if you aren't careful! The loose fibers can really soak it up, so a bit of burnish first helps compress the fibers and slows down dye absorption. I use a Q-tip to dye edges, and pinch it between my fingers to wind the cotton tight (helps to prevent fuzzies leaving dye where you don't want it)! I also squeeze out most of the dye on the edge of the container before putting it to the leather. It's best to go sparingly - you can always add more if needed but can't really remove it if you go too heavily. If you do woodwork, it's not too different from staining/finishing end grain. An exact color match is pretty hard to get, but for me that's OK since I like the edges a little darker. Personally, I don't like gum tragacanth, as it will discolor your leather if you get a bit past the edge, but a lot of folks use it and get great results - and it's what Al Stohlman suggests in his writings. As with so many things in leatherwork, there are many ways to get to a good result - sometimes exactly the same, sometimes a bit different - all depending on what YOU like! Beeswax leaves a duller finish, paraffin shinier and other things leave a glass like edge (one such is Tokonole). It all depends on what you want for the final look. Edge finishing chrome tan and edge coat paints(on chrome OR veg tan) are an entirely different subject, and you'll find plenty of info and opinions on that on here as well. Bill
  10. Recommended Leather Suppliers (US)

    Where you buy, in part, depends on what you are looking for .. If you want vegetable tanned leather, there are two tanneries left in the US and both make great leather - and you can buy from them directly - both offer tooling leather, saddle skirting, bridle leather, etc. Hermann Oak is considered by many to be the best, but there is a minimum order which is a bit much for most hobbyists. Wickett & Craig is the other veg tannery and they also sell to the public with no minimum quantity. Bill
  11. First airbrush attempt

    Dyes usually go with no problems. You might want to filter resolene a bit since it can get gloppy in a hurry, and don't let it sit around for long. Bill
  12. Star Wars Aztec Calendar

    That's awesome! Bill
  13. Swedish bandolier

    Is that brass just a sort of clip that holds pieces in place? Bill
  14. New cartridge bag

    I realize this bag is for cartridges, where the gun powder is contained in brass cartridges, but some folks out there still mess around with muzzle loading guns (muskets and such) and hence carry gunpowder to load them. Anything that might create a spark could potentially be disastrous - steel/iron can spark, brass won't. Since modern gear evolved out of that older style of shooting accessories, it's probably one of the reasons that brass is still preferred - for practical reasons in the past, and historic reasons now. Bill
  15. New cartridge bag

    It's a great looking bag, and I think the buckles are fine. They aren't overly shiny, which might look a bit out of place. Brass would really look great to give it a little more traditional look, and if it were for anything black powder related would be a must. Bill