billybopp

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About billybopp

  • Rank
    Leatherworker.net Regular
  • Birthday 07/06/1964

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Pennsylvania, USA

LW Info

  • Leatherwork Specialty
    Strap goods, cases, etc.
  • Interested in learning about
    There is always more to learn.
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  1. Tutorial on Mug Making

    there's some info in this thread about food-save high temp epoxy resin .. http://leatherworker.net/forum/topic/26684-sealant-for-leather-mugsbottles-with-hot-liquids/ -Bill
  2. Trouble in Paradise

    ROFL. So much truth right here!
  3. Fiebing's dye comparison

    Leather dye and pro dye are both alcohol/spirit based. Oil based pro refers to synthetic / oil based pigments and tend to yield better little better color and I find easier to use. I haven't used acrylic nor low v.o.c. but they are less toxic for use in schools, etc and places like California where some ingredients are regulated. Not sure what's in n.f.o.compound, but most say to use pure n.f.o. instead. -Bill
  4. I have a real problem with those belts. I can't decide which I like better, since they both look great. And thanks for sharing your layout tricks! -Bill
  5. Barry King Mauls

    Agreed - A good maul for tooling, and something heavier for punches. I actually prefer a dead-blow hammer for punching - dead cheap at most home supply stores. -Bill
  6. 3D design programme

    I haven't tried it myself, but have heard good things about tinkercad - a free 3d browser based cad program. -Bill
  7. My first Cobra Class 18 Creation

    Well done! ... And a first project? Amazing!
  8. Checkered back

    Agreed, it's likely from the tannery from the drying process. Leather is often dried and stretched on a screen of sorts - sometimes with a vacuum, others just air-dried. -Bill
  9. Am I the only one?

    I'm pretty much convinced that you simply can not work with leather for very long without making exactly that sort of mistake. Here's a picture of one of mine. Notice that the strap for the top center Gomph knife goes opposite the direction of the CSO at the right - The wrong direction. Since it's just for me, I didn't re-do it ... at least not yet. -Bill
  10. How to resist spirit dyes.

    Looking good! That latex stuff does work great, but it feels soooooo damned weird when you peel it off. It's like peeling skin after a sunburn. (I've seen your skin tone and you're living in the Mediterranean - I know you know what I mean!) -Bill
  11. Buckle suppliers

    I've bought some very nice buckles and hardware from buckleguy - Nice buckles and other hardware in lots of colors and finishes. Weaver Leather Supply has some great looking buckles etc - they carry the really nice fancy lookin' Jeremiah Watt hardware line. And of course, as DJole suggested, Ohio Travel Bag. -Bill
  12. Braec Moedoic Budget Bag

    Sweet! It looks great. It's not every day that you get to see a replica of a piece that's over 1000 years old - and not everybody that gets to make one! -Bill
  13. Croc clutch!

    That looks really awesome! Well done, and again thank you for posting progress pics along the way! It's really fascinating to watch these things come together. -Bill
  14. Looks pretty darn good, Chief! That's a great looking knife too. I only see three things I'd suggest doing differently - and bear in mind these are just my own opinions so take with a grain of salt. 1. The stitching looks good, but does not exactly follow the outline of the sheath. You could probably still trim off a small bit of leather from the edge to match the stitch line and it'll look good. 2. The parallel lines in the figure at the right of the sheath aren't quite parallel. It ain't easy, to get them exactly right and is something that I had trouble with too. There is a simple solution ... A beader blade for your swivel knife. It has two cutting edges a set distance apart. I think I got mine from eBay, but Barry King sells them in varying widths. If you aren't really going for parallel, you can exaggerate the curves a bit more to make it look more intentional. All that said, it still doesn't look bad! 3. There are a few stray tool marks where the tool went onto the smooth leather. That's still possibly fixable by rubbing those areas with a modelling spoon. Nevertheless, really good work! -Bill
  15. saving money on granite

    You are likely to find a surface plate in any metal machine shop, or places that supply machine tools. They are pretty much always a hefty chunk of granite that is perfectly flat, and used to gauge anything that must be absolutely flat across a distance. They come in different grades referring to the degree of flatness. For our purposes lesser grades would be fine. In machine shops where high precision is required, they are occasionally lapped and re-calibrated as in this youtube video. They can be expensive (better grades more-so), but have the advantages of being heavy granite and more or less readily available. -Bill