celticleather

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About celticleather

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    Leatherworker

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Hertfordshire, England

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  • Leatherwork Specialty
    Belts and bags
  • Interested in learning about
    All aspects of leatherwork
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  1. This is the closest one I've seen. From http://jtbatchelor.co.uk/ in the UK. It doesn't have a roller, but the raised loop is similar. Available in solid cast brass.
  2. I think the Craftool (Tandy) version of the strap cutter has caused problems for many people because the slot for the blade is cut at the wrong angle. The Original Strap Cutter, made by The Leather Company (see https://www.etsy.com/listing/95211213/the-original-strip-and-strap-cutter-the) is a better version. I've been using the same one for nearly 40 years without any problems. I have four plough gauges and a draw gauge, but I still prefer to use the strap cutter! Below is a pdf of the original instruction manual, which I found when I was clearing out my old workshop. Strap-cutter.pdf
  3. These units do tend to make a loud buzzing noise when the flash heater is activated. At this time, they draw a lot of electrical current, which causes the transformer to buzz louder. This vibration can often be transmitted to the casing of the unit, which amplifies the sound. Try pushing on the top and/or sides of the unit when the flash is operating (preferably using something insulated), and see if the note changes or disappears.
  4. I use Gum Arabic, which is used extensively in the printing trade, as a finishing coat for lithographic printing plates (it prevents the plate surface from oxidising). When I run short I visit my local printing works and beg a small bottle from them. A half-litre bottle lasts for ages, and even this needs to be diluted 50:50 to get a good consistency. They may have what is known as 'synthetic gum', but it is basically the same, and works perfectly well.
  5. That particular thread from Le Prevo is an excellent product! I use it all the time, but I always wax it before use. The wax keeps the thread from untwisting, and provides a degree of lubrication.
  6. If you ever find the spelling checker, try putting this through it . . . POET TREE WITH MIST ACHES I have a spelling chequer It came with my pea sea It plainly Marx for my revue Miss steaks eye cannot sea Eye strike a quay and right a word And weight fore it too say Weather eye am wrong oar write It shows me strait away As soon as a mist ache is maid It nose bee four two late An dye can put the error rite Its rarely, rarely grate I’ve run this poem threw it I’m shore your pleased to no It’s letter perfect in its weigh My chequer tolled me sew Sauce unknown. Usually comes up totally correct!
  7. I buy all my leather from Andrew Parr at Baker's. It's not cheap, but it's a wonderful product to work with! Here's another little photo essay from the tannery in Devon . . . http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/in-pictures-14442109
  8. Fish oil is applied to bridle leather as a part of the currying process. It soaks into the grain of the leather, giving it a greater tensile strength and preventing the surface from cracking. I've often noticed that some hides smell more strongly than others, and guess this would depend upon the amount of oil used, and possibly the 'freshness' of the oil. Take a look at 4min 20sec of this video. The smell usually fades after a few days in the fresh air. http://s1132.photobucket.com/albums/m564/celticleather/?action=view&current=Tannery.mp4
  9. I think Bruce has got it about right! I have seen a similar tool for fixing buttons onto shoes, but I think this one - if it's a fairly long staple - would have been used to fix buckles to shoe or boot uppers. I used to have a boxful of button staples, and the quantity on the box was 'One Great Gross'!
  10. Yes, the SpaceFly mats are self healing. They can be turned over to use the back side as well!
  11. Loads of them on eBay! Look for A1 or A0 size cutting mats. Prices vary quite a lot, but I find that the SpaceFly ones are best, and last for years!
  12. This is almost certainly a sole channelling machine. It was used for cutting a channel around the edge of a shoe sole, into which the welt stitches were sewn. Somewhere towards the top it should have a L-shaped blade which can be raised and lowered by a lever. Turning the crank caused the blade to bite into the shoe sole, and rotated the shoe to make the channel around the sole. After stitching, the channel was glued and closed, hiding and protecting the stitches. The picture below shows the sequence: 1 The channel is cut 2 Channel opened up 3 Stitch holes made with awl 4 Sole stitched to welt of shoe 5 Channel glued and closed We have a similar machine in our shop, still working!
  13. Here's somewhere I'd like to visit next time I'm in Paris . . . http://www.poursin-paris.fr/index.html. Their buckles look superb!
  14. In the UK there was a well known paraffin vapour lamp, the Tilley, but they are long out of production, and are now collectors itemsJust for the record, Tilley are still in business, but have no complete lamps on sale at the moment. www.tilleylamp.co.uk
  15. The denatured alcohol that Chief mentions is called Methylated Spirit here in the UK. It's cheap and pretty easy to obtain. It reduces all the Fiebing's spirit dyes very effectively. The Fiebing's institutional dyes are water-based, so obviously water works well!