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Found 26 results

  1. Firs attempt at these, next project are Mukluk's so was essential to get some practice. Made from Bovine,coated in Mink oil. Bison will be use for my next project. Added a second piece for the sole to add to durability. First test walk I found the heal needed to be thicker, gonna put some crepe rubber on their so it lasts, just have to shave the base so glue sticks. It was a learn as you go experience.
  2. Firs attempt at these, next project are Mukluk's so was essential to get some practice. Made from Bovine,coated in Mink oil. Bison will be use for my next project. Added a second piece for the sole to add to durability. First test walk I found the heal needed to be thicker, gonna put some crepe rubber on their so it lasts, just have to shave the base so glue sticks. It was a learn as you go experience.
  3. Firs attempt at these, next project are Mukluk's so was essential to get some practice. Made from Bovine,coated in Mink oil. Bison will be use for my next project. Added a second piece for the sole to add to durability. First test walk I found the heal needed to be thicker, gonna put some crepe rubber on their so it lasts, just have to shave the base so glue sticks. It was a learn as you go experience.
  4. Firs attempt at these, next project are Mukluk's so was essential to get some practice. Made from Bovine,coated in Mink oil. Bison will be use for my next project. Added a second piece for the sole to add to durability. First test walk I found the heal needed to be thicker, gonna put some crepe rubber on their so it lasts, just have to shave the base so glue sticks. It was a learn as you go experience.
  5. I work with Dacca Overseas Limited, one of the largest exporters of footwear in Bangladesh. We produce leather footwear, apparel and accessories working with the best manufacturers in the country. We are able to supply quality leather footwear starting from $20 (depending on the order quantity) and our minimum order quantity is 200 pairs per style. Visit our website for more information : https://www.daccaoverseas.com Email me at : khandker.dayef@daccaoverseas.com if you want to know more. Khandker Dayef Client Relationship Manager Dacca Overseas Limited
  6. By the end of the week I am expecting to receive the following in the post: A cheap (Chinese made, with probable Japanese influence) beginner's sett of leather working tools from Ebay A remnant/pieces pack of leather, needles, and thread from The Identity Store A copy of "The Leatherworking Handbook" by Valerie Michael from Amazon Yet to acquire from the local chain DIY store (probably nearer the time, or on Sunday if it slips my mind before then which is likely to happen) are: wood and fixings to make a cheap stitching pony Evo-Stik Time Bond contact adhesive an Oilstone (or similar) for inevitable initial sharpening of previously mentioned tools as well as general upkeep later on miscellaneous things that catch my eye which may be helpful such as clamps, sandpaper, straight edge etc Other things yet to be appropriated into my "kit": worksurface stuff (cutting mat, poly board, granite (or similar)) decent desk lamp as most of my work will be completed in the late evening/small hours after finishing the late shift at "the day job" and goodness knows my eyes will need all the help they can get edge slicking substance graph/grid paper for when I feel up to making my own patterns bone folder type tool stitching awl Things I already have, yet to be consolidated together: poly mallet basic geometry set (ruler, square, compases etc) pencils large toolbox for storage stack of "craft" drawers for storage non-marring spudger set which I'm sure will come in handy for poking/prodding in crevices metal bodied Utility knife (and blades) Extra Virgin Olive Oil in lieu of more specialist finishes tonnes of old clothes for rags Things I will probably get at a later date once I get a feel for everything (this does not include ad hoc replacement/upgrading of any of the above when needed): butcher's block style work station (as I'll mostly be working at my 10yr old pine desk in my bedroom initially, maybe out in the shed weather permitting) relevant dyes, treatments, etc and relevant applicators basic carving tools (I do not plan on getting into this much but I guess it's always handy to be able pop a pretty border on something special) ___ I know the cost of starting a new hobby from scratch is always going to be a major consideration, but it seems leathercraft is even more so. Yes I know it's no good moaning to other people who have all been there/done that, but starting out on a shoe string is still likely to cost me upwards of £100 ($125 for you colonials ). Being the sort of person I am, often doing things on a whim, and generally cautious with cash, I do not want to go to the lengths that some do and get The Works in terms of equipment and materials to start with. I don't want to spend a small fortune on something if I don't end up getting decently into it to justify the cost. That said, it seems the general advice in terms of initial outlay is "get the best you can afford" and that's what I'm doing I suppose. I guess there are those out there who have started out with much less, and I have no need nor reason trying to justify what I'm doing. I guess in a way I'm secretly hoping that I get sufficiently good enough at the whole "leather thing" that in the long run I can start going to fairs, events, do made-to-order and the like, and be able to become (at least partially) self employed. But that's definitely a long way off. I think for me leathercraft will always be a matter of being on a shoestring, at least in the sense of trying to get the best from the least. I've always been enthralled by the way craftsmen of all disciplines in years gone-by have come up with ingenious solutions which even centuries or millennia haven't changed much, and as much as possible I want to keep what I do "low-tech": drawing up templates by hand rather than using PC software, using as traditional methods and tools as possible, and if possible trying to be authentic in style/process with any historical based pieces I produce. I (like to think) I am fairly good at improvising, and this will also keep costs down. Who needs a £40 edge slicker when a double-pronged piece of deer antler (free if you know where/when to look) will do? Or expensive black dyes if you can master the likes of vinegaroon and lampblack?
  7. Hello all! Newbie here, with a question! Nothing overly involved or complicated here. I want to do something fairly basic, I think. I want to make these boots: ...look like this: These are the same type of boot: a WW2-era paratrooper 'jump' boot. The company that makes the new boot is the same company that made the original (Corcoran) and they are identical. I've read that I can get the 'creased' look by binding up the boots and soaking them in cold water for a day. Any advice on the coloring? Should I be dyeing, or using oils or waxes to tan the leather? Tips would be appreciated. Thanks!
  8. DIY Line Finisher

    I'm looking into making (or buying, on the off chance that flying pigs are sighted) a line finisher. It's mainly for shoe/boot making. What are the essential features? Looks like a muslin and horsehair wheel would be really useful. Also, a burnishing wheel. A few sanding wheels. What about trimming/cutting wheels? I usually see cordwainers cutting soles by hand. And the tool used for marking stitches on a welt? Is that essential or just nice-to-have? Also, I see some cone-shaped wheels that look like vitrified grinding wheels. What are those for? A shelf seems important. And what other features would you want? What about belt sander wheels vs drums? Seems like the drums would be a lot simpler and the belts would be higher performance. I suspect there will be lots of "just buy one" and "you can pick one up at an auction for cheap" and "DIY is a false economy" thoughts. I don't mean to start a debate about DIY or acutioning or whatever. I'm just trying to understand the basic requirements for a line finisher.
  9. Hello all! My first official post here, so please go easy on me! I've been reading up as much as I can here on the forums and elsewhere, but still have some questions as a new leatherworker! I am new to leatherworking, but have bootblacking experience and am familiar with leather overall. I recently got a pair of fantastic vintage Wesco boots, which are in incredible condition and have so much life still. They are a rich mahogany Redwood color with some darker staining and scuffs, so I'd love them to be a deeper chocolate brown. I'm unsure of which type of leather the boots are made of, but its a type of oil tanned I believe? I purchased Fiebings Deglazer, Pro Oil in Dark Brown, and Bag Kote. I also have Obenaufs which is my go-to for conditioning/waterproofing my leather. I'm planning on spending ALOT of time, to paint around each white stitching, to avoid getting dye on the white stitches as much as possible. From what I have researched here, the initial steps would be to: 1. Deglaze to remove finish and waxes. 2. Use Pro Oil dye over entire boot. 3. Buff off excess, and repeat dye/buffing until even coating. -------------------------------------------- Now, I've read here that some people use neatsfoot between dye and finish, to help seal in oil. However, I like to regularly condition and treat my boots after wearing. Would Bag-Kote prevent later conditioning? I've also read that some use Obenaufs/Sno-Seal as a finisher after dying. Is this enough to prevent oil transfer when wet or in contact with moisture? Or would Bag-Kote be a better lasting option? Thank you for the help!
  10. We are selling out our complete shoe repair and custom bootmaking shop in Poplar Bluff, Mo. We have two post machines that are like new, bought from Nick o Sew a couple years ago, one single needle, one double needle. There is also a Boss Tippman that is still just like new bought only a year ago. The rest of the shop equipment is older but in good working condition. There are 250 pairs of cowboy boot lasts and shoe lasts on which 7 toe styles can be made...some barely used. Full size runs with widths from AA to EEE or wider are represented in most styles. There are lots of supplies including thread, soling leather, rubber soling, heel bases and lifts, upper leathers and even some exotics. Would like to sell as a complete package. Buyer must come to the shop and arrange moving. Call 573-686-4545. No calls after 9pm central time please. I will not respond to texts. I can email detailed photos upon request. Asking price for complete shop package is $15,000. Let`s talk.
  11. New Work Boots

    Finally finished my new work boots. Look a lot like my last pair.
  12. Hi all, Pretty new to boot making and looking for some advice on leather. I live in the Pacific Northwest, which if you don't know is a soggy muddy mess across a lot of the region for a lot of the year. This as you may imagine wreaks utter havoc on leather boots, or leather anything else that is subject to the weather. I am wondering if anyone has suggestions for types of leather or particular tans that might have a better chance than others of holding up to these sorts of conditions in the long run. I know I know, take proper care of them, don't wear them in the rain, expect them to die young, wear rubber boots, etc. etc. This question is about particular types of leather that might possibly stand up to a wet climate better than others. If the answer is none, well, so be it. But worth checking! Any thoughts or resources would surely be appreciated, thanks.
  13. Hi all, Pretty new to boot making and looking for some advice on leather. I live in the Pacific Northwest, which if you don't know is a soggy muddy mess across a lot of the region for a lot of the year. This as you may imagine wreaks utter havoc on leather boots, or leather anything else that is subject to the weather. I am wondering if anyone has suggestions for types of leather or particular tans that might have a better chance than others of holding up to these sorts of conditions in the long run. I know I know, take proper care of them, don't wear them in the rain, expect them to die young, wear rubber boots, etc. etc. This question is about particular types of leather that might possibly stand up to a wet climate better than others. If the answer is none, well, so be it. But worth checking! I will try this same question in the forums for types of leather also. Any thoughts or resources would surely be appreciated, thanks.
  14. I have these tools I bought at an auction a while back. I need help identifying what their use is. I do mainly saddle and harness work, so if they are for shoe/boot work, they are for sale or trade. I haven't found a use for them yet but Maybe if I knew what they were for, who knows ??? That awl haft is solid iron. Why would you need a haft made of iron ?? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks
  15. Hi, I'm new to working with leather and about to start my first project. I'm trying to do some costing on a pair of shoes I want to make to figuire out what the exact input cost will be. This is what I have in mind (see below). How many pairs of shoes can one make on average with a piece of leather 1 meter by 1 meter (3.2 foot by 3.2 foot). Any guidance will be much appreciated
  16. Does anyone have a supplier for the longer shanked boot conchos? I want them for many projects I have going and so far have not been successful. Figured other on here might know!
  17. Hello! Let me present to you my third work. My first work were these boots http://leatherworker...showtopic=45616, design Merrell Chameleon Wrap, and the second, running shoes, design Garmont Escape PRO 9.81, on photo bellow. And here shoes numbered 3, with my own design and own logo, which will be discussed here and manufacturing technology, which I would like to share with you. The first thing I began with - design, available materials and furniture. Despite all this, you can correct design subsequently as I did. I began the design with a clean sheet of paper. Sketched a few pictures I settled on this design, considering the design features and attachment parts sequence - this is important , otherwise it will be impossible to attach it properly. It is also important to think about where and how will shape the bend. To improve inflection, I used an extra pair of belt loops on the shoe vamp. Here demonstrated only one of many possible designs of shoes, the rest depends on your imagination. http://i-fotki.info/...031277.jpg.html "By approving the project" could begin. Put all materials on shoe last (except upper material) in the right amount and manner as they would be in the finished shoe. It is necessary to put a thickness of insole and middle sole. For further winding of shoe last, use masking tape 20-25mm wide, wider is not recommended. Masking tape should stick well, but not to be wax outside, otherwise it will be bad stick and when removing the shell it can lose shape. http://i-fotki.info/...031431.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...031468.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...031491.jpg.html Glue tape needs with a little overlap, preferably without wrinkling. After sticking enough thickness of tape, insert shoe last in the outer sole and outlines the level to the visible part, below which all will hide. http://i-fotki.info/...031619.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...031648.jpg.html We should also mark the axial lines, front and rear. Now we can begin to design. Draw is best with conventional ballpoint pen, using gentle pressure and instead of the eraser, use pieces of masking tape. Underway, you can change the design somewhat, if in dimension will not like something. Since the right and left side is not quite the same, move all lines using vellum, for example, you will not succeed. Help you centerlines and tailor measuring tape. After completion, you must draw harder all the necessary lines, to avoid confusion. http://i-fotki.info/...031709.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...031815.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...031845.jpg.html Using sharp knife, making slit at axial lines and lower edge, to divide into two parts. By dividing, cut along the contour, including the toe cup as the most convex part. Parts became more flat, but they still can not be cut, they must be glued on thick paperboard, while leveling and cropping. More detailed process describes here http://www.youtube.c... for shoes&sm=3 http://i-fotki.info/...032008.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...032046.jpg.html Now is necessary to make slits on lines for creating patterns. http://i-fotki.info/...032207.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...032235.jpg.html Creating patterns is most responsible for connection all parts. Using the main patterns make all external parts. It is necessary to consider all overlaps, overmeasure and mark centerlines. You should also specify the right and left sides, as well as the front to each side. http://i-fotki.info/...032285.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...032313.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...032340.jpg.html After making all patterns, you can begin to cut material. Also note, if were made ​​some amendments to the upper, it is necessarily to make them on patterns. http://i-fotki.info/...032387.jpg.html I have a regular sewing machine (Singer copy), therefore the manufacturing technology reminds classic shoes, where is no need of a post sewing machine. I made some improvements for greater sewing accuracy and larger thickness. I replaced original hand driven mechanism and attached own lever directly on the wheel. Instead of three stitches per one revolution, now it makes one (used for hand sewing of large thickness). Undergone revision and presser foot, making it narrower and shorter, increased downforce, improved visibility and accuracy. Needle used conventional 110, although it is better to use reinforced for leather, thread polyester 40. http://i-fotki.info/...032557.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...032583.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...032604.jpg.html Before sewing, machine needs to be adjusted for a specific material thickness and test on a separate piece. My primary material is haberdashery suede 1-1.2 mm thick. http://i-fotki.info/...032654.jpg.html Should start with the basic parts, on which is necessary to mark those details, which will be sewn first. Because of the sliding effect and high downforce of the presser foot, one material slides relative to another, I found a simple solution for this problem, parts before sewing, I gluing together after what, concentrating on precision stitching. http://i-fotki.info/...032713.jpg.html Since suede is not for footwear, however, it is strong enough, to provide proper rigidity of some parts I’m using 1mm thick cotton fabric. http://i-fotki.info/...032779.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...032806.jpg.html Having measured braid using patterns, glue and sew them, then you can sew the side part. Do the same with the second half and then sew together both parts. Stitch on these parts is 2.5-3mm. http://i-fotki.info/...032978.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...033039.jpg.html After receiving a single piece (upper), it’s ready to make a heel cap. Since I did not have a proper shoe last (proper shoe last on pictured below), I made a separate billet for forming the heel, but with a normal shoe last is done directly on it. Cut two pieces of cotton fabric, stretching and gluing together with SAR 306. When dried, transfer lines with pattern and cut. http://i-fotki.info/...033091.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...033129.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...033381.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...033431.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...033457.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...033479.jpg.html Then glue it on heel in folded position on shoe last and sew it with stitch 2.5-3mm. http://i-fotki.info/...033535.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...033559.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...033593.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...033616.jpg.html Now you can begin with layer over the heel of polyurethane foam and lining. There are no patterns for these parts, so lay out on the shoe last, blank sheet of paper, draw around the top and cut. There no corrections for polyurethane foam, but lining must be recalculated - 1mm suede + 3mm polyurethane foam + 3mm wool interlayer + 4mm lining allowance = minimum 11mm total must be added to the upper contour, on which will be sewn lining. This is necessary to ensure that all will twist neat. http://i-fotki.info/...033673.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...033705.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...033735.jpg.html Sew need right by the polyurethane foam, for smooth edge, stitch 1.8-2mm. For insulation using natural wool, material thickness about 3 mm, the same material used on the first boots. Gluing with SAR 446, applying thin layer on wool and suede. The photo shows masking tape, 5-8 mm to the edge, where wool layer will be needed to cut. http://i-fotki.info/...033796.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...033827.jpg.html Then gluing lining with SAR 446, also applying thin layer. http://i-fotki.info/...033883.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...033921.jpg.html All excess need to be cut and sewn, on that edge, where the masking tape was. At this stage, the shoe begins to appear. As can be seen on the photo, it keeps form well, but the final forming will be at the very end. http://i-fotki.info/...033977.jpg.html When the upper is ready, next part you need to continue - tongue. There also no patterns, but you can estimate the length using upper, the width of the tongue I took from my sport shoes - 100mm. Gap width in the shoe vamp is 40mm, respectively adding 6mm allowance, will be enough for sewing. On a sheet of paper draw everything and make pattern, cut the mesh and lining without any overmeasure. Put some polyurethane foam (about 3mm) on the tongues top (for thickness and strength) and sew together mesh with lining face to face. Then glue mesh with wool layer and extroversion. http://i-fotki.info/...034032.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...034054.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...034191.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...034218.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...034262.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...034286.jpg.html Cut a piece of suede, glue and sew. Mark the braid and sew. http://i-fotki.info/...034383.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...034406.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...034426.jpg.html Connect together tongue and upper with clearance 40mm using SAR 446 and then sew together stitch to stitch. Mark border of the toe cap on upper and glue with SAR 446 along the edge, as well as toe cap, connect and sew, stitch is 2.5-3mm. http://i-fotki.info/...034718.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...034749.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...034859.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...034891.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...034918.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...034939.jpg.html Now put the upper on the shoe last, I leave allowance in 20mm for bend under the shoe last, only for upper, side parts, heel and toe cup should be in the slice with the bottom. After toke the upper, cut out the toe reinforcement from cotton fabric, glue with SAR 306, tighten in place. Once again, make sure that upper is in the right position, remove the staples and glue. Cut off all suede relief and glue suede center part. When it's all ready, it's time to form the shoe. We need to warm all shoe parts, that has inside cotton fabric and tap with a hammer, to complete forming. After that, shoe will keep the shape for a along time. http://i-fotki.info/...035595.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...035647.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...035683.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...035713.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...035741.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...035767.jpg.html Basically shoe are ready for gluing outer sole, but I would like to stamp on it own logo. To do this, take a picture of the shoe from the side, where logo will be, open the vector program Corel Draw, import photo, create a logo in scale and print on plain paper. Take sticky film Oracal, and cut out the logo with sharp knife, slot only to the film substrate. Unstick from the film unnecessary parts and glue masking tape over all parts. Cut and stick the logo in its place. Carefully remove the masking tape, leaving all separate pieces in place. Glue around with masking tape to avoid smudge of shoe. Preparation is completed and we are ready for rubber coating. As rubber coating I’m using SAR 306 and 30-40% of aluminum powder (for metallic effect). Using brush, apply thin layer and let it dry for a couple of hours. With precision knife cut glue on film edges for smoothness of the logo edges without rips. Due to a thin layer of coating it obtained fairly resistant to damage. http://i-fotki.info/...035832.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...035873.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...035901.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...035924.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...035950.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...035974.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...035995.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...036020.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...036039.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...036068.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...036089.jpg.html Finishing stage, gluing the outer sole. Left the upper on shoe last and insert it in outer sole, outline with pen about 1mm below the level of the outer sole. Apply SAR 306 on surface, coat over line and let it dry. The outer sole is made from thermoplastic and I need degrease it with special composition Satreat and only then glue it. When the glue dries, it does not stick at all, conversely it's slides. Insert shoe in the outer sole, heat bottom side with hairdryer and press for a few seconds. Then you can easy heat side parts and tap with hammer. By this way it’s easy to make clean connection between upper and outer sole. http://i-fotki.info/...036284.jpg.html http://i-fotki.info/...036312.jpg.html After a few hours, you can remove shoe from the shoe last. It remains only to make insole. For insole I am using - 2mm thick polyurethane foam, 3mm wool interlayer and 3mm lining. http://i-fotki.info/...036371.jpg.html Glue the insole on its place and do all the same with the second shoe and enjoy your work. When placing this article on other sites link to this forum is required. Sorry for not exact terminology and not perfect english. Good luck!
  18. Hi, I’m new here and have never worked on leather before but am interested learning some dyeing skills. I’m planning on buying some tan brogue boots and dying them in a chocolate and aubergine colour scheme (see pictures). Any recommendations on which dye products to use and how to do this would be much appreciated. Thank you in advance.
  19. Hello all, I have an interesting project restoring/rebuilding my faithful boots that have quested to the far side of the world and back. Not at all falling apart, but requiring improvements. I need help on choice of glue. My current issue is deciding how to repair what I can only refer to as the inner 'insole', made of thick, hard leather, through which the original nails went which go into the heel. Also, at the front, the current (replacement) rubber outer sole is stitched throught it. However, at the 'waist' point, just behind the stitching, this piece of inner structure has split in half, right where the sole flexes the most. The pictures may help you understand. I need to bond this piece back inside the boot fairly solidly. I've read about various glues, for ages, and have gone round in circles trying to decide the best glue(s) to basically 'bed' this piece back in, fill up the gaps and cracks, plus allow waterproofness/flexibility etc. Any advice from those in-the-know? --- For interest, I've attached another pic, of the heel, which is the first thing I've 'improved'. The boot is an old New Rock cowboy-style model, with the metal-effect nylon heel. I've had them over 10 years. A bad re-heeling meant I wore into the plastic heel, so have now replaced most of this fake heel with an aluminium block, and faced this with a PROPER stainless steel trim. The rubber grip is a military replacement heel, modified. The leather will be refinished (slight age crazing, nothing too bad, need to also find what best for that..), and they had cavalry-type extended tops, which I am rebuilding in proper boot leather (which I have sourced/selected successfully, hooray!) Cheers, Ed
  20. I bought these boots on ebay to make boot purses out of the tops. I sent them to a friend of mine to cut the tops off. When I got them I realized they FIT me and it was too late to make them full length boots again, so I came up with this last night so I can wear them. The one that's finished looks really good in person. Pics just don't do it justice. Comments welcome. Cheryl
  21. I have a guy that's asked me to make some boots for his girlfriend. I don't make boots. I'm a wallet and bag kind of guy. He has a picture of what he wants. It appears to be a custom pair that someone else has made. Anyway, if anyone is interested in this, I'd gladly pass your name and information along to him.
  22. Went to Magic in Vegas in February with new collection : You can see the whole collection here: counterego.com The website is back: leatherfx.com and the other one is: printingonleather.com We do digital printing onto leather - serving fashion, acsessories and upholstery industry worldwide. Here is a link to a little write-up about our company: http://read.uberflip.com/i/88855 on page 60 Here is another sample of our work:
  23. I've been trolling around in the shoe forum. Wow, there is a lot more to making shoes than I might of thought. I was curious, has anyone made lace up motorcycle boots? I'd love to see a picture of some. I've read through a lot of the topics, but haven't seen anything like that. I can't wrap my head around how you make the top of the boot, when the last is only the foot? How would you attach a rubber sole?
  24. Hand Made Boots Inspired By Merrell

    Greetings to everybody! Here i want to show some little expirience about creating boots. This is my first shoes i ever made. I very much like older version of Merrell shoes like chameleon series, which in production no more and i thought why not to make them by myself. It was interesting job that i done. Everybody are welcome to watch result on youtube.If you have some questions, i will answer with pleasure. to be continuum......
  25. Greetings to everybody! Here i want to show some little expirience about creating boots. This is my first shoes i ever made. I very much like older version of Merrell shoes like chameleon series, which in production no more and i thought why not to make them by myself. It was interesting job that i done. Everybody are welcome to watch result on youtube.If you have some questions, i will answer with pleasure.