JustWakinUp

PhotoBox

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Ok guys,

My kids had a field day with my photobox. So I want to build a bigger badder photobox. ( Typical Male, my wife says ) So what I'm asking is if you wouldn't mind posting a photo of your photo box to give me some inspiration. Maybe post a picture that you've taken in that photobox as well. Thanks in advance

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http://strobist.blogspot.com/2006/07how-to...oto-studio.html

If you do a search in our search box you will find some that others have posted.

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Here are some photos of one I built recently, along with some details of how it was made...

LightBox01_600.jpg

LightBox02_600.jpg

LightBox03_600.jpg

LightBox04_600.jpg

LightBox05_600.jpg

Kate

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post-7-1208711067_thumb.jpg

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Good looking photo box Kate!

I have been wanting to make one myself, and this one looks easy and inexpensive!

Thank YOU!

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Thanks for show this. I think I may make one.

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Thanks, and you're quite welcome. It is very cheap and easy to make one of these things, and in any size you want. I think I only spent about $30 or so for everything. Cutting and fitting together pieces of PVC is like playing with Lincoln Logs (if anyone remembers those), pretty easy even for me.

Good looking photo box Kate!

I have been wanting to make one myself, and this one looks easy and inexpensive!

Thank YOU!

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Photo box?

I was just getting use to the Beveling.

Guess I have to trade in the Polaroid

I hear they have some kind of digital camera now.

WOW!

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For those of you (or those of us...) who are too busy or lazy to build your own box, I saw these advertised in Shutterbug this month. Folding portable ones with two color backdrop fabric. The home depot versions will be less expensive and you can make them larger, but sometimes, you just can't wrangle that trip to the hardware store...

http://www.calumetphoto.com/item/RM1009/

Not endorsing a specific model - if anyone knows of others, post 'em!

Brent

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I have seen some based on those wire frame pop open tents and auto shade screens, don't remember where probably Inkley photo or some company like that. Apparently they fold flat when not in use. Guess you could call them mini tents.

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WHAT THE HECK IS A PHOTOBOX?

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WHAT THE HECK IS A PHOTOBOX?

It's kind of a little photo studio to take high quality photos of your work. It gives your subject a good source of very intense diffused light. If you sell your stuff online, a photo box (or "light box", or "soft box") is a must.

Kate

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A foldable card table makes a good frame that you may already have hiding some where. If you don't need photo box every day, you may want to use this method and transform the card table into a photo box (with shower curtain/lights, background) just when you need it.

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Kate, you just make me sick.... in a good way that is. I have been fighting with taking photos of the knives and cases I make. Your design is so stinking simple and looks to work just great! Thanks for sharing you photo box...

Gary Antley

Possum Walk Texas

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For those of you (or those of us...) who are too busy or lazy to build your own box, I saw these advertised in Shutterbug this month. Folding portable ones with two color backdrop fabric. The home depot versions will be less expensive and you can make them larger, but sometimes, you just can't wrangle that trip to the hardware store...

http://www.calumetph...om/item/RM1009/

Not endorsing a specific model - if anyone knows of others, post 'em!

Brent

I'll endorse this one Brent. I have been using the Calumet Portacube for the past three or four years to photograph my wife's sculpts for her website.

You can see the results here Sculpted Bliss. The only shot we got a pro photographer on was the "film noir" set - as the model was just too big to light and shoot with my kit.

The lighting is done with a homemade contraption - basically a free standing wooden frame that fits up the sides and over the top of the cube. I have two bayonet light fittings screwed to each side (six in total) and have daylight fluorescent lightbulbs in each. I also have another lamp attached to a magic arm so i can position it to the side of the camera and give a little more sparkle to the shots. I also use white foamboard hard up against the bulbs to direct as much light into the cube.

Depending on the model, and the look we want, i don't always use all the lights. Shadows can help bring out the 3d aspects of the models.

Some of the images have been taken with a Digital SLR (canon 350d) and some with a fujifilm f40d (little digi cam) - as long as a tripod is used, then you should get good pix.

After shooting, i always optimise the images in Photoshop, adjusting the black and white levels, as well as adding a touch of sharpness using the Unsharp Mask tool. Then optimise the image for web use and the results are high quality images with very small file sizes.

adam

Edited by lightningad

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for those of you who live in bright areas, you could always shoot your photos outside and make use of the most efficient light source thats available - the Sky!

Overcast days will give a more diffuse lighting, sunny days will give more stark shadows, but these can be overcome by using reflectors to bounce light into shaded areas.

Ever seen Star Wars? The Death Star attack sequence as well as the models of the town Mos Eisley were all shot outside, making use of the sun as the light...just like reality.

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Hi!

I think its time I got myself a photobox.

What do you think of this portable box here: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Interfit-INT310-Photobox/dp/B0024NKHEA/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1338186715&sr=8-9

Is it worth buying or would I be good with just the shower curtain setup?

For lighting, I found this set of lights: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/2-X-Portable-Photo-Photography-Photobox-Cube-Studio-Light-Softbox-Tent-Lighting-/180875788098?pt=AU_Cameras_Photographic_Accessories&hash=item2a1d097f42

which would probably be good in terms of portability, but I don't think 2 of these will provide enough light. How many of them do you think I need? At 50W they don't seem too bright, but I have no idea if they are good for the box or not=)

What bulbs do you use in your boxes?

Thanks!

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Hi Chavez -

this is the one i have and it costs a bit less than the one on Amazon but looks almost identical....

Calumet Portacube

For lighting i built a frame that stands around the outside of the cube and has 6 bayonet mounts attached (2 on each side) . I then use daylight balanced fluorescent bulbs (make sure to get the same mount as your holders) which i bought off ebay a couple of years back..

I think i paid about £12 for 6 bulbs. I don't use all the bulbs at once though. I tend to vary the positions of the bulbs to help add some depth to the models i photograph. Photos taken using Portacube - These are not leather goods, but wedding cake toppers my wife sculpts. The principals remain the same though!

I have found that to really lift the images, I will have three or four bulbs in the holders (I also prop white foamboard behind the bulbs to bounce as much light back into the cube as possible), I have also mounted a bayonet holder onto a spigot that fits in a "Manfrotto Magic Arm" which allows me to position a lamp in front of the cube, and re-position it really easily.

As for portability - i keep the bulbs stored in a box safely removed from the frame, the Cube folds flat, and the foamboard is stored inside the flat cube. The Frame is pretty flat, apart from the feet.

Depending on the camera you use, you will be able to improve the images by learning how to use the manual modes.

My little digi cam is mainly auto, so i can't really set exposure or aperture, and have to rely on the auto features to try get the shot i want.

Because o this i tend to stick to using a DSLR. As the model being photographed is not moving, and my camera is on a tripod, i can have a long exposure and a smaller aperture. This helps get a deeper depth of field. The biggest giveawy that something is small is a shallow depth of field.

And don't forget to white balance your camera to the light being used.

adam

edit:- forgot to say, the curtain method will probably work fine as long as you are a reasonable diy'er, and dont mind a fair amount of mucking about. The cube i have is great because its so quick and easy to put up and fold away. If you go the shower route, be careful to pick a pure white, as any kind of tint in the fabric will affect the overall colour balance of your lights. Also, be wary of the plasticised materials as these could be affected by the heat given out by the lamps.

Edited by lightningad

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Thanks lightningad!

I love diy, but I just don't have much space for a workshop at the moment =( I'll definitely go with the photobox you are suggesting - it's got white background instead of blue like the one I found.

Still don't know what to do with the lighting. I was about to throw away a broken clothes dryer, but now I think it will make a great portable frame, so I might try to mount some bayonets on it =)

PS will 20 in be enough for archery quivers, or would 24in be better ? =)

Edited by Chavez

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hmmm - i would probably go for larger size.

I haven't made a quiver, but i do know the arrows i have are about 32/33" long ( I have quite a big draw on my bow!)

As for the background - its a reversible one with white on one side and a soft gey on the other (well it is on mine!).

Just a thought - I'd be tempted to get a bit arty for stuff like archery kit. Rather than a sterile white tent, why not find an old mossy log and lay it on a sheet which is pegged up at the back to give an endless cove effect, then lean your quiver against the log. You can still light it with the bulbs and reflectors you get. Should give you a much more interesting image that is in keeping with the romantic ideas of Robin Hood and his band of murderous thieves!

For the sake of spending £15 on bayonet mounts from B&Q and a couple metres of electrical cable, you could have all you need to get started with your lights. It might not look as professional to you, but as long as the photos are well lit, the viewer will have no clue how you lit the shot. And its the end shot that really matters.

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Instead of a box, have a look at using 'softboxes'. The photobox is limited to where the lights are positioned, but with one or two softboxes, you can place them almost anywhere, changing the lighting for different subjects, moving them further away for darker shadows, closer for no shadow etc. I know the photobox is easy, but once you get into the art of photography, you can get more creative with one softbox and a large white reflector, and it is very easy to set up and change around.

Corey

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