Wizcrafts

The Type Of Sewing Machine You Need To Sew Leather

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KAYAK45   

Tackgirl:

Those cowboys cylander arm machines can be fitted with an optional flat table and will do both nicely. I have the 4500 and have not removed my flat table since I bought it, BUT I CAN!

Kevin

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Toledo Industrial Sewing Machines has dozens of flatbed walking foot machines, from most well known brands, including the Chandler you mentioned (I saw a bunch of Chandlers there last year). Call them at 866-362-7397 and see what they can do for you.

The website, as it is currently, is featuring the Cowboy cylinder arm leather stitcher line and the Consew 206RB flatbed upholstery machine. That doesn't mean that they have no other machines. On the contrary, there are hundreds of industrial machines in the building. They actually prefer doing sales over the phone.

Hi Wiz, I finally got around to contacting Toledo today..no answer...daRn it.. but did take a look at some of their neat Cowboy machines...they have a Cowboy model #2500 that is about all I can afford at this point with the S&H...only problem is it says it can leave marks on the leather?

The Cowboy CB2500 has feed dogs to move the material, against a fixed, or roller pressor foot. This may leave visible tooth marks in the bottom layer of leather. These marks can usually be rubbed out with a smoothing tool, or hammered out by laying the back layer on a smooth hard surface, covering the top with a 10-12 oz piece of hard veg-tan leather, and tapping along the stitch line with a mallet or hammer. If this sounds like too much work,

Just wondering if any members have this machine or know about this machine and what can you do to remove the leather marks or if it really does leave marks on the leather? Since I'm sewing mostly leather handbags with lots of fancy stitching already on them... not sure I would want to deal with cleaning up marks on the leather or stitching? :cowgirl:

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Hi Wiz, I finally got around to contacting Toledo today..no answer...daRn it.. but did take a look at some of their neat Cowboy machines...they have a Cowboy model #2500 that is about all I can afford at this point with the S&H...only problem is it says it can leave marks on the leather?

The Cowboy CB2500 has feed dogs to move the material, against a fixed, or roller pressor foot. This may leave visible tooth marks in the bottom layer of leather. These marks can usually be rubbed out with a smoothing tool, or hammered out by laying the back layer on a smooth hard surface, covering the top with a 10-12 oz piece of hard veg-tan leather, and tapping along the stitch line with a mallet or hammer. If this sounds like too much work,

Just wondering if any members have this machine or know about this machine and what can you do to remove the leather marks or if it really does leave marks on the leather? Since I'm sewing mostly leather handbags with lots of fancy stitching already on them... not sure I would want to deal with cleaning up marks on the leather or stitching? :cowgirl:

A bunch of our members own either the CB2500, or the GA5-1, which is the same machine in a different skin. These are a good machine for heavy duty sewing, with thick thread. I am not sure that leather handbags would require such a heavy duty machine, nor the big needles and heavy thread these machines are made to use. They use thread sizes 138 and up and needles from #22 or 23, up. They sew to 7/16" and are best used with hard leather (belts, straps, bridles, reins, collars, leashes, holsters). Typically, the CB2500 is setup with a #25 or 26 needle and threaded with #277 or #346 bonded nylon thread.

Tell me more details about the leather handbags. Things like the type of leather (chrome tan, veg-tan, latigo, bridle), thickness being sewn (from - to), thread size and type you want to use, speed you want to sew at, and arm/body depth you need to rotate the bags freely as you fancy stitch them. These details will help us suggest the best machine for these bags.

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Tackgirl:

Those cowboys cylander arm machines can be fitted with an optional flat table and will do both nicely. I have the 4500 and have not removed my flat table since I bought it, BUT I CAN!

Kevin

Thanks Kevin, that is good to know..I wondered about the cylinder arm machines..they are pretty neat.. Raphael Sewing has really cool one... I might would even sell my horse to own that one! lol!:thinking:

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A bunch of our members own either the CB2500, or the GA5-1, which is the same machine in a different skin. These are a good machine for heavy duty sewing, with thick thread. I am not sure that leather handbags would require such a heavy duty machine, nor the big needles and heavy thread these machines are made to use. They use thread sizes 138 and up and needles from #22 or 23, up. They sew to 7/16" and are best used with hard leather (belts, straps, bridles, reins, collars, leashes, holsters). Typically, the CB2500 is setup with a #25 or 26 needle and threaded with #277 or #346 bonded nylon thread.

Tell me more details about the leather handbags. Things like the type of leather (chrome tan, veg-tan, latigo, bridle), thickness being sewn (from - to), thread size and type you want to use, speed you want to sew at, and arm/body depth you need to rotate the bags freely as you fancy stitch them. These details will help us suggest the best machine for these bags.

Thanks Wiz, I REALLY appreciate your interest and input.:notworthy:

They are made of old cowboy boot top leather, the fancier ones with lots of pretty stitching.. the way they used to make good boots..lol! I then add a piece of leather to the bottom so it will set up good ..add straps, fringe along the sides, conchos etc..boot top leather is usually a thinner leather than what the foot of the boot is made of....usual thickness is around 1/8" but would have to double that for sewing the different parts together, in case of adding the fringe you then have to sew the 2- 1/8" thickness leather together plus have another 1/8" of fringe leather in the middle of the seam. About 3/8" all together maybe a little more...

So you see my dilemma on the right size machine..not sure I need the real heavy duty Cowboy machine..though I would LOVE to own one...but then again it might be just what I need? lol!

Enclosed a pic of an idea for a iphone case... I've been working on..made out of the boot top leather..rough stage..needs to be sewn together. :(

post-23648-006802700 1312606045_thumb.jp

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I am glad i found leatherworker.net and I enjoy reading it very much.

It was difficult for me with no experience in sewing to make a sewing machine choice.

Thanks to all contributors here and especially to Wizcrafts' posts I was able to make an informed decision.

This summer I acquired a Cowboy 4500 from Bob Kovar and it was a lot of fun making different items on this machine.

Here is one project that proved to me that i got the right machine. It is a leather and jeans backpack. (please see the attachment)

Even though it is relatively light duty bag there are several tough spots in it.

There are folds of thick leather on top of heavy nylon fabric together with some thick jeans folds.

Many of those layers are with glue between them.

Some spots are at least 1/2 inch of very stiff material to get through and the machine showed no stress at all.

Just do not press the pedal too hard or it will go too fast to properly control the material.

I am very glad that i got this machine.

post-22714-094912600 1316054816_thumb.jp

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(snip)

Here is one project that proved to me that i got the right machine. It is a leather and jeans backpack

Even though it is relatively light duty bag there are several tough spots in it.

There are folds of thick leather on top of heavy nylon fabric together with some thick jeans folds.

Many of those layers are with glue between them.

Some spots are at least 1/2 inch of very stiff material to get through and the machine showed no stress at all.

(snip)

What size, or sizes of needle and thread are you using to sew these awesome backpacks?

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What size, or sizes of needle and thread are you using to sew these awesome backpacks?

I used #22 ball point needle and T135 nylon thread and harness presser foot assembly.

This choice was made after #20 needle bent on a first try and #22 was the largest ball point I had on hand at that time.

I had larger needles but those were all for leather and i have heard somewhere that they will cut the fabric and the seam will not be strong.

T135 was used because i like thick threads but bigger thread would adversely affect gentle feel of this very soft leather.

I used Harness Foot because this is the only one i have.

Your question however prompted me to investigate effects of different needles on nylon fabric.

For the experiment I used 0.15 mm nylon fabric (0.0065"), #22 ball point, #23 spade point, and #25 triangular point needles.

It is not exactly apples to apples comparison but i think it is enough to prove my original assumptions wrong.

None of the needles seem to inflict any damage on the fabric which was a total surprise to me.

Only the largest needle caused threads to pull in cross shape which i do not think can be considered a mechanical damage.

I do not see any evidence of cutting.

It seems that i was wrong and I could have used leather point just as well and achieve different type of stitch.

The experiment is not ideal however because i did the puncturing by hand.

I will try it on the machine under normal conditions if I do not forget.

PS Thank you question and for your opinion about the backpack.

post-22714-039920600 1316137526_thumb.jp

post-22714-064608100 1316137867_thumb.jp

post-22714-043774400 1316138413_thumb.jp

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MattDC   

I realize I'm not the first to say this, but after quite a while of reading the posts on leatherworker.net, this is my first post. I've been making small leather accessories (wallets, key fobs, magnetic money clips) for friends and family for a little over a year now but recently, I've become interested in scaling up my production abilities. Specifically, I'd like to be able to sew leather handbags, briefcases, etc and hand-stitching the two handbags I've made recently was nothing short of an exhausting activity. That being said, I quickly realized how much time I would save with a sewing machine. I've read the previous posts and recommendations, but still was hoping to get input from some of you.

I'm looking to spend less than $2,000 on the sewing machine, but I am willing to go a little bit over budget for something that will last. I don't intend to produce any holsters or saddlery; the only things I will be doing is stitching runs on belts and straps, and stitching handbags and wallets... maybe making some chaps if I decide that's something I want to do. My only concern is that I would like to stitch some high quality leathers and I don't want the machine to damage the leather in the process. The machine I have my eye on is the Techsew GA5-1R. Once I factored in shipping, it would be about $1600. On other websites, some folks have recommended the Tippman Boss, and, of course, I've heard nothing but good things about the Cobra machines, though I'll admit they're a little more than I want to spend. The only other stipulation I have, is that due to the smaller, more intricate projects I work on, I would place the ability to control the speed of the stitching as my highest concern (something it seems that the servo on the Techsew is well-suited for).

Any input y'all can pass along will be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

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I realize I'm not the first to say this, but after quite a while of reading the posts on leatherworker.net, this is my first post. I've been making small leather accessories (wallets, key fobs, magnetic money clips) for friends and family for a little over a year now but recently, I've become interested in scaling up my production abilities. Specifically, I'd like to be able to sew leather handbags, briefcases, etc and hand-stitching the two handbags I've made recently was nothing short of an exhausting activity. That being said, I quickly realized how much time I would save with a sewing machine. I've read the previous posts and recommendations, but still was hoping to get input from some of you.

I'm looking to spend less than $2,000 on the sewing machine, but I am willing to go a little bit over budget for something that will last. I don't intend to produce any holsters or saddlery; the only things I will be doing is stitching runs on belts and straps, and stitching handbags and wallets... maybe making some chaps if I decide that's something I want to do. My only concern is that I would like to stitch some high quality leathers and I don't want the machine to damage the leather in the process. The machine I have my eye on is the Techsew GA5-1R. Once I factored in shipping, it would be about $1600. On other websites, some folks have recommended the Tippman Boss, and, of course, I've heard nothing but good things about the Cobra machines, though I'll admit they're a little more than I want to spend. The only other stipulation I have, is that due to the smaller, more intricate projects I work on, I would place the ability to control the speed of the stitching as my highest concern (something it seems that the servo on the Techsew is well-suited for).

Any input y'all can pass along will be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

Hi Matt, thanks for your interest in our machines.

While the Techsew GA5-1R is a great leather stitcher, I would not recommend it for sewing wallets, handbags or chaps. This machine has a pretty aggressive feeding mechanism that is more suitable for heavy leather work such as harnesses, tack, tool belts and more.

The most appropriate machine for you would be the Techsew 2700, which is an all purpose general leather work machine suitable for wallets, handbags, chaps, belts, vests, upholstery and more. Since it is a compound feed (triple feed) machine, it will not damage your leather at all. It comes equipped with the Techsew SmartServo motor ideal for speed control and we also have an optional flatbed table attachment for this machine.

Feel free to give me a call if you have any other questions!

Thanks,

Ron

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rough   

This article is now being Tweeted on Twitter. Thanks all!

BTW: I am @Wizcrafts on Twitter. My tweets are mostly about computer and website security, malware threats and spam analysis, but I do make the occasional Tweet about my leather and sewing work.

Today is my birthday, so I probably won't be posting anything new today. I'll get back to this article later, or tomorrow. I know I have a contract sewing job to do sometime tomorrow. Maybe I'll shoot a couple of pix of my walking foot machine earning me some money. It may help someone who wants to sew similar leather projects.

I have shot a few movies of my machines, with my digital camera, but haven't figured out how to convert them from Apple .MOV files into WM .AVI files. I may see if YouTube has a converter and upload them there, for the world to see (in Flash format).

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piddler   

How about this one? It fits into my budget. I sew primarily small leather accesories, wallets, belts, insides, etc and have always used a class 15 for these things due to space limitations, but would like to expand. Thanks in advance for all your help.

JUKI LU-563 Walking Foot Upholstery, Leather Sewing Machine - $895

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How about this one? It fits into my budget. I sew primarily small leather accesories, wallets, belts, insides, etc and have always used a class 15 for these things due to space limitations, but would like to expand. Thanks in advance for all your help.

JUKI LU-563 Walking Foot Upholstery, Leather Sewing Machine - $895

A Juki LU-563 will work fine for your small parts, interiors and belts. You are advised to test it first. Juki stopped making that series almost a decade ago. Also, sew in forward, then hold down the reverse lever and see if it sews into the previous holes. If not, you'll need to consult with a mechanic who has worked on Jukis.

The bobbins in the LU-563 hold about twice as much thread as the standard bobbins in a class 15, or the LU-562. They were good production machines and were used in large and small factories to sew jeans, leather garments and coats. They usually have clutch motors with big pulleys, to get the highest speed possible. Time is money in production. But, continuous high speed operation wears out even the best sewing machines. Check the moving parts carefully for excessive wear.

If you buy this Juki, know that is is a manually oiled machine and requires a few drops of oil in every oil hole, prior to use. Use sewing machine Lily oil only.

The 563 can tension up to #207 thread, if the top tension beehive spring is the heavy duty one. Otherwise, it will top out at #138 thread, top and bottom. The maximum thickness sewn is 3/8 inch, although the feet lift 1/2 inch with the knee lever. It can handle #69 thread with a #16 or 18 needle for lighter work.

The LU-563 also works great with the heavy cotton and polycore thread used to sew hems on jeans.This is size 30 and 40 thread. It is available in a dedicated orange color for jeans, on small and large cones.

Needles used are the common walking foot type 135x16 (leather) and 17 (cloth), which are available in most sizes up to #25.

If you cannot learn to feather the clutch, you'll need to replace the motor with a servo motor. I use a SewPro 500GR on my flat bed machines. They are available from Toledo Industrial Sewing Machines.This would drive up the cost of the machine to almost $1100 and you can buy a brand new Consew or Chandler walking foot machine, already equipped with a SewPro motor, for almost as much.

Edited by Wizcrafts

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piddler   

A Juki LU-563 will work fine for your small parts, interiors and belts. You are advised to test it first. Juki stopped making that series almost a decade ago. Also, sew in forward, then hold down the reverse lever and see if it sews into the previous holes. If not, you'll need to consult with a mechanic who has worked on Jukis.

The bobbins in the LU-563 hold about twice as much thread as the standard bobbins in a class 15, or the LU-562. They were good production machines and were used in large and small factories to sew jeans, leather garments and coats. They usually have clutch motors with big pulleys, to get the highest speed possible. Time is money in production. But, continuous high speed operation wears out even the best sewing machines. Check the moving parts carefully for excessive wear.

If you buy this Juki, know that is is a manually oiled machine and requires a few drops of oil in every oil hole, prior to use. Use sewing machine Lily oil only.

The 563 can tension up to #207 thread, if the top tension beehive spring is the heavy duty one. Otherwise, it will top out at #138 thread, top and bottom. The maximum thickness sewn is 3/8 inch, although the feet lift 1/2 inch with the knee lever. It can handle #69 thread with a #16 or 18 needle for lighter work.

The LU-563 also works great with the heavy cotton and polycore thread used to sew hems on jeans.This is size 30 and 40 thread. It is available in a dedicated orange color for jeans, on small and large cones.

Needles used are the common walking foot type 135x16 (leather) and 17 (cloth), which are available in most sizes up to #25.

If you cannot learn to feather the clutch, you'll need to replace the motor with a servo motor. I use a SewPro 500GR on my flat bed machines. They are available from Toledo Industrial Sewing Machines.This would drive up the cost of the machine to almost $1100 and you can buy a brand new Consew or Chandler walking foot machine, already equipped with a SewPro motor, for almost as much.

Ok, makes sense, and really thankful for your input and vast knowledge. This will be my last question. Is this the Chandler you were rederring to??

http://www.ebay.com/itm/200719127196?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649#shId

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Ok, makes sense, and really thankful for your input and vast knowledge. This will be my last question. Is this the Chandler you were rederring to??

http://www.ebay.com/...1423.l2649#shId

Same machine, but I don't recommend sewing machine dealers who aren't members of LWN, if one of our dealers sells the same machine. If you buy the same machine from our dealers you are going to get great customer service after the sale. Industrial sewing machines are not necessarily intuitive to adjust and operate. It helps to be able to pick up the phone and ask the seller questions about its operation, adjustments and available or custom made accessories.

You can find more information about the Chandler 406RB-1 here.

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G'day all, I'm fairly new to sewin, and have only just found this brilliant wealth of knowledge, so firstly a big thanks to all contributors! I have a question regarding the Consew 206RB that is mentioned regularly in this thread. I have started manufacturing protective collars for hunting dogs using an old Singer 15-91 (which is clearly not designed for that task). The materials I use range from four layers of seatbelt up to 3 layers of rubber-backed canvas firehose. On my seatbelt plates I often include a 3mm thick leather patch on the front for increased puncture resistance. I have been given the opportunity to purchase a 206RB-2 for $300 - my question for the experts here pretty much comes down to this - is this machine suitable for the thicknesses/densities I plan on sewing, giving consideration to the multiple different types of materials being sewn at once? Cheers for any advice. Mark.

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Mark;

A Consew 206RB-2 sews up to 3/8 inch (10mm) of material, with at least #138 and possibly up to #207 thread and has triple feed. I think this will suffice for your webbing and fire-hose projects.

Edited by Wizcrafts

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Hello my name is Travis and I'm a complete newby to the website and I only really joined to find out more information about working with leather for tooling and upholstery processes. I own a small custom motorcycle company here in TX. I specialize in restorations of vintage Japanese, British and early American motorcycles as well as hand build cafe racers. I fabricate most all of the custom parts such as the fuel tanks, the seat base in both metal and fiberglass and up to now some limited custom leather seat covers. I started leather tooling a few years ago when I hand made a chopper seat for a friends cruiser bicycle. It turned out very nice and have done another 10 seats since then for other friends who saw my work. Each of those seats were hand stitched which I might add took hours to learn and accomplish for each seat. If I calculate the time involved to fabricate and tool the seats I made, I gave them away for about $4/hr. But they were all valuable lessons learned.

I made the mistake of believing the internet hype and buying a "special" offer Singer model HD110 last year for $300. I must admit that if all I was making was garments from light weight materials, this would be a very nice machine. But what sold me on it was the endless sales pitches and claims that it was leather and canvas capable. I guess it is leather capable, if the only material you are sewing is two layers of 1-2oz garment leather. I made 2 simple seat covers before giving up entirely.

So about a month after taking the hard road, I began to search out and learn all I could about the "Industrial" walking foot machines on the market. I knew that no matter what I just couldn't justify spending any thing more than about $1000 for a tool that might get very limited use in my shop. I am a one man operation and most of my time is spent with the TIG welder running or spending countless hours on the English wheel making the alloy bodywork. I can see where a good machine will allow me to take on more specific work but I doubt I'm do more than 10 seats a month, possibly ever.

I called around to all of the upholstery shops within a 100 mile radius just to see if they had any suggestions or recommendations. It seamed like every shop I called just happened to have a good "used" machine sitting in the corner collecting dust as they only used it for the big jobs that required a tougher machine. The prices ran the gamut from as cheap as $300 to $3000 and most of them looked like I'd be spending some time with a degreaser and a tooth brush. I passed on all of them but I kept hearing brand names like Juki and Consew. Well this last week I picked up two new clients who both have complete ground-up builds and both will need custom seats and I just knew my little Singer wasn't going to cut it. I started really searching Craigslist for the entire state of TX and picking were slim. I needed to make the 3 hour drive to Austin to pick up a motorcycle anyway so I searched Austin CL and found 2 Consew machines for sale. One by a private owner and the other by a very reputable upholstery shop. I called both listing and left my contact info and hopped in the truck and started driving.

About an hour later the first contact called me back. He was selling a 225 model that he had bought from a qualified and well known repair shop in the Austin area called City Sewing Supply just over 12 years ago. He told me he had taken an upholstery course in college, bought the machine used for $900 12 years ago and then only used it on 3 or 4 projects. When I asked if I could come by to look at it, he said I'd have to go to City Sewing Supply, ask for the owner and if I was going to purchase it, I'd have to pay the owner a fee for his last tune up so he'd release the machine and then he'd meet me with the rest of the machine. (the table and motor was at his home while the head unit was being serviced) All this sounded a little too fishy seeing as his asking price was $700 + whatever I was expected to pay his service guy to release it to me.

The second listing was from a reputable upholstery shop in the Austin area who was selling a model 226r-1 that from the pictures looked brand spanking new. When I asked Rebecka why they were selling it, her response was that they had upgraded to newer machines last year and this particular machine was kept around for when they would be sewing heavier materials. But she admitted that it hadn't been used in the year since it had been serviced by the same guy at City Sewing Supply and who they purchased the new machines. The asking price was $700, I offered $600 and gave her the story that I drove 3 hours to get there, and she said what the hell, and gave it to me.

So now I'm the proud owner of a very well maintained Consew 226r-1 and I can find only limited information on this machine so far. I did find a PDF of the operators manual and found the oiling points and all the suggestions for speed reduction pulleys and the servo motors and the like. What I really need to know is this machine capable of what I want to do with it? My primary use will be leather seat covers made from 2-4 layers of 1-2oz and 3-4oz material. I seriously doubt I will do anything with the heavier tooled leather I previously mentioned but if the machine is capable it would be nice to know. I think I will try to either get used to the clutch motor or some time down the road replace it with your suggested servo motor. I just can't justify the expense and the down time waiting for it to ship and get setup right now.

Any suggestions for needles, thread to use, or any good needed accessories would be greatly appreciated. Also anyone need a Singer HD110? I'll sell it cheap!

Thanks for your time and expertise. Look forward to hearing from you. Travis

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Hello Travis and welcome I am a holster maker in San Antonio. If you are ever around look me up I will buy lunch. I am not familar with your mach I use a Cobra 4 and really like the machine, I use it everyday .

Take care

Robert

www.mecopocketholsters.com

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Thank you Robert for the kind offer. I live down South East of you in Port Lavaca right on the bay. Its nice and peaceful here, just like I like it but a little tough to do business when most all my clients are in the Houston and Austin areas. I find myself traveling a bunch. Sometimes on the bikes I build. I do have perks in my job.

Thanks again. Chat soon, Travis

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So now I'm the proud owner of a very well maintained Consew 226r-1 and I can find only limited information on this machine so far.

Any suggestions for needles, thread to use, or any good needed accessories would be greatly appreciated. Also anyone need a Singer HD110? I'll sell it cheap!

Thanks for your time and expertise. Look forward to hearing from you. Travis

It uses system 135x16 leather point and 135x17 regular point needles, available wherever industrial sewing machines are sold. There have been plenty of posts on this forum showing needle vs thread sizes. Or, you can consult the needle and thread chart on Toledo Industrial Sewing Machines.

This is a light duty walking foot machine and is suitable for the soft leather you will be sewing. The bobbins are standard industrial G size, best suited to thin thread. Your machine can handle up to #138 bonded nylon or bonded polyester thread. If the bobbins run out too soon, try using #92 in the bobbin and #138 on top. Or just #92 top and bottom.

The 226r-1 only yields 5 stitches per inch, which is fine for seat covers. If you can't afford a servo motor and the machine runs too fast for you, buy a smaller motor pulley and a shorter v-belt to match.

Keep the machine oiled between uses.

Don't try to use thread heavier than #138, nor work thicker than 3/8 inch.

Here is a topic about the same machine, from Feb 2012

Edited by Wizcrafts

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It uses system 135x16 leather point and 135x17 regular point needles, available wherever industrial sewing machines are sold. There have been plenty of posts on this forum showing needle vs thread sizes. Or, you can consult the needle and thread chart on Toledo Industrial Sewing Machines.

This is a light duty walking foot machine and is suitable for the soft leather you will be sewing. The bobbins are standard industrial G size, best suited to thin thread. Your machine can handle up to #138 bonded nylon or bonded polyester thread. If the bobbins run out too soon, try using #92 in the bobbin and #138 on top. Or just #92 top and bottom.

The 226r-1 only yields 5 stitches per inch, which is fine for seat covers. If you can't afford a servo motor and the machine runs too fast for you, buy a smaller motor pulley and a shorter v-belt to match.

Keep the machine oiled between uses.

Don't try to use thread heavier than #138, nor work thicker than 3/8 inch.

Here is a topic about the same machine, from Feb 2012

Thank you very much, that is exactly what I was hoping for. Talk soon Travis.

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Thank you very much, that is exactly what I was hoping for. Talk soon Travis.

May I suggest that you open a new topic for your future questions, rather than using this pinned topic?

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How much is retail price for the rapid E machine?wich model brands is cheaper. many thanks in advance.grouphug5vj5.gif

http://www.panhandleleather.com/images/13004665692221190320830.jpeg..What is the real deal about this machine ,got 16 kind/type of stitching ?are this machine go for rapid E.

post-30545-050554500 1334548396_thumb.jp

Edited by oldsboot12

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I was going to ask WTF is a Rapid E machine, but I saw the photo you posted. It is some kind of sole stitcher. I dunno, $500? Maybe this is better asked in a shoe repair forum. We mostly deal with belts, harness and holsters.

Still, it sews leather soles. Offer $500. If they want to sell it they'll take your offer.

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