3arrows

Barrel saddle horn repair

Recommended Posts

I have been asked to repair the rawhide horn weave by several people on their barrel saddles. Seems like they dont last very long when you are hanging on for dear life a lot of the time. Does anyone know if the weave can be bought (already weaved) or is this a hand made item? I was thinking about doing a nice quality roping style rawhide wrap, since it seems like it would hold up better. How do you guys do these types of horn repairs?? thanks again as always in advance of the best advice on the web... ron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have been asked to repair the rawhide horn weave by several people on their barrel saddles. Seems like they dont last very long when you are hanging on for dear life a lot of the time. Does anyone know if the weave can be bought (already weaved) or is this a hand made item? I was thinking about doing a nice quality roping style rawhide wrap, since it seems like it would hold up better. How do you guys do these types of horn repairs?? thanks again as always in advance of the best advice on the web... ron

Pull the fork cover and put the rawhide back on as it was new.I would use better rawhide than the factory did.It should last a long time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3arrows,

I'll agree with Brew that better rawhide will last longer. We live in pretty similar climates out here and probably see some of the same problems. It also shows my thoughts on how rawhide has a reputation for durability that may not be deserved for this application. Rawhide edge bindings and braided horns are supposed to protect what is underneath (the leather). They are the first thing to go, and then the leather lasts much longer than the covering that was protecting it. These barrel racing saddles have had nothing more than woman's hand wear them out. As soon as the varnish wears, that thin rawhide will start degrading.

In the time it takes to temper the rawhide, cut it, braid it, fuss with it as it dries, and tack the ends down, I have two leather covers done. I price the rawhide recovers twice as much as the leather replacements. Most of these have aluminum horns and no filler layer, so the horncover can loosen and twist. I drill 3 holes in the horn cap, tap it and run three countersunk head machine screws through the filler layer and cap, then cut the bottoms of the screws off flush. I go back and put on my bottom and top pieces and sew through all 3 layers to cinch them down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually all of my requests so far have been from men who ride in the performance events. A 200+ lb guy can really so some damage when he's holding on to that horn going around poles.

Ok, so I agree with you, Im going to do the leather covers and screw them to the horn as you described. Then sew the top and bottom pieces to the middle one..thanks for the advice,, ron.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Ron!

If your customer is adamant about having a rawhide weave (and is willing to pay what you ask) then there is was a step-by-step guide in LCSJ several years ago. If you don't have access to it, let me know and I'll send you a copy via snail mail. If he'll go for a sewn leather cover, then I'd jump on that before he changes his mind!!

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mike, if you get a chance send me the step-by-step guide, I searched and didnt come up with anything. I definitely want to know how to do it, and may have some customers that want it done no matter the cost..thanks ron..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mike, if you get a chance send me the step-by-step guide, I searched and didnt come up with anything. I definitely want to know how to do it, and may have some customers that want it done no matter the cost..thanks ron..

Mike, can you also send me a copy of those same instructions? I am running into the same area Ron is as well. Thanks in advance. Dennis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It seems to me that these saddles with the rawhide braided horns were factory made and the investment the customer has in it would not often merit a removal of the swell cover and re-braid with rawhide. This is a rather labor intensive, and therefore expensive repair, as has been mentioned.

So, anything you can do to avoid removing the swell cover is probably going to be the best answer for these situations. Just cut off the rawhide and restitch a half cap and then wrap with latigo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Late to the party here but Mike Craw I am having the same issue.  Is there any chance I could please get that guide too?

:D 

I dont understand the attraction/fixation of these rawhide horns.  If I did a leather cover then rawhide would it last better you think? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, FloridaLeatherGirl said:

I dont understand the attraction/fixation of these rawhide horns.  If I did a leather cover then rawhide would it last better you think?

While I hate doing these as much as anyone, I do understand why some people want them.  It is the smallest possible way to cover a horn.  In other words, you get the smallest possible cap size.  Barrel racers are usually women, and women typically have smaller hands than men, and the larger the horn, the harder it is to hold on to.  Also, the braided rawhide offers better grip than just a leather cover.  I will admit that I also offer, and maybe try to talk them into the traditional leather wrap as an option when someone wants a braided horn recovered.  Some are fine with a leather cover, some are not.  Some opt not to have the horn recovered at all when they find out it is more of a job and consequently a much higher cost than "just kind of glue it back together".  If I was a barrel racer (I am not), I guess I too would opt for a rawhide braided horn.  In any other type of riding, with the possible exception of cutting, I would not want a tall, skinny horn that will more easily poke a hole in my belly or anywhere else should a horse fall with me or, god forbid, flip over backwards. 

Edited by Big Sioux Saddlery

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A barrel full of common sense I'd say Big Sioux!

 

Silverd

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now