hectron

Sealing Leather After Dyeing?

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hi all, ive start my first leather projects and theyre going pretty well. my question is, im using eco flo leather dyes, how do i "seal" the dyes in after theyre applied? i have a bottle of "eco flow super shene leather finish" my friend gave but im not 100% if this is a sealant of just a gloss finish. is there anything else, if this isnt acceptable as a finish, that i can use to finish my leather to give a professional look? what is recommended to "buff" my leather after sealing? i get all my supplys from a tandy leather store by the way, since i prefer goin to stores v.s. online ordering.

one last question, do you apply gum tragacanth before or after sealing your leather to round the edges ? im asking because i noticed a great deal of dye, enough to reveal the natural color of the leather, was removed after i dyed the leather then applied gum tragacanth. thanks in advanced all :D !

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Dump the Super Sheen down the drain and get a bottle of Acrylic Resolene. Mix it 50/50 with water. For the edges, after I dye the project, I use a canvas cloth or a burnishing wheel (Tandy) to slick the edges. I don't use the Gum or anything other that the damp dye or water. After the dye dries for 24 hours, I buff all surfaces until they have a sheen to them, then I apply the resolene and let dry 24 hours and buff. I use a piece of scrap sheeps wool for all my buffing.

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so the super shene is crap? is it decently reliable at least because i already applied 2 coats of it to my projects :unsure: got me a little worried now

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hectron, . . . when in doubt, . . . refer to Radar's message.

He has the subject well covered. Super sheen is sort of the bottom rung on the finishing ladder. Resolene takes you much further up, . . . gives you UV protection, . . . is almost water proof, . . . leaves a beautiful shine, . . . is easy to work with.

It is not a "be all" or "do all" finish, . . . but it is hard to beat for holsters, belts, some purses, bags, boxes, knife sheaths, seats, etc.

Mayy God bless,

Dwight

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hectron, . . . when in doubt, . . . refer to Radar's message.

He has the subject well covered. Super sheen is sort of the bottom rung on the finishing ladder. Resolene takes you much further up, . . . gives you UV protection, . . . is almost water proof, . . . leaves a beautiful shine, . . . is easy to work with.

It is not a "be all" or "do all" finish, . . . but it is hard to beat for holsters, belts, some purses, bags, boxes, knife sheaths, seats, etc.

Mayy God bless,

Dwight

Dwight, is there something that doesn't leave all the shine? I make carved notepads and other small items that are handled all the time but aren't going to need to be weather proof. I want to seal them well but find when I use acrylic based seals the items end up shiny. I would like to keep the more natural look of the leather.

Thanks in advance,

Bob

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Dump the Super Sheen down the drain and get a bottle of Acrylic Resolene. Mix it 50/50 with water. For the edges, after I dye the project, I use a canvas cloth or a burnishing wheel (Tandy) to slick the edges. I don't use the Gum or anything other that the damp dye or water. After the dye dries for 24 hours, I buff all surfaces until they have a sheen to them, then I apply the resolene and let dry 24 hours and buff. I use a piece of scrap sheeps wool for all my buffing.

I'm probably just doing something wrong but I never get anything but a finish that shines like it is plastic. Then with much flexing it wants to crack into tiny spider webs. I use Montana pitch blend and it leaves the leather looking like leather instead of looking like a plastic toy, it doesn't crack, has a pine smell like most everyone seems to be ok with.

Like I said though I probably just haven't been doing something right with it as I'm self taught and just learn from trial and error. I've tried airbrushing it on very thin and that does reduce it's cracking with very thin application but still get a plastic look.

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Bob, . . . you might try a product called Bag Kote, . . . another Feibings product.

It produces a much softer looking and feeling product without all the sheen.

I use both Resolene and Bag Kote, . . . resolene 50/50 with water, . . . bag kote is 60/40, bag kote to water.

I brush both on with a bristle brush, . . . that 1 inch wide, 49 cent, el cheapo, pure bristle brush, . . . then wash the brush out with soap and water. I lather it on fairly good, . . . making sure that each and every square inch is covered, . . . including the edges, . . . brush it , brush it, brush it, . . . back and forth, . . . up and down, . . . oblique left/down then right/down, . . . and keep brushing until all the bubbles are pretty well brushed out, . . . I then hit it VERY CAREFULLY with my heat gun to dry up any streaks that might try to form, . . .

If I want a high gloss finish, . . . using this priocess, . . . I usually have to do multiple coats.

I personally shy away from Bag Kote only because the ammonia (or something in it) aggravates my breathing, . . . but it is a good product.

With either one, . . . I then hang em up for 24 hours before I get serious about handling them.

May God bless,

Dwight

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Iron Pounder, it sounds like the product may be going on too thick. I tried resolene straight from the bottle and it appeared thick to me. I started mixing with water and use the cheap bristle brush Dwight mentioned on most of my projects. I have airbrushed the resolene on and got good results. I had a leather arm bracer autographed by a band I like and sprayed over the Sharpie signatures to protect them.

Hectron, I started out with Satin Sheen and was very disappointed with it when I tried to use it as a block for antiquing. The project came out okay, but much darker than I had planned. As was stated earlier, I think the "Sheen" products are good "starters". However, there are many other finishing products on the market that are much better. Resolene is the product I am comfortable using and it does what I want it to do for end results i am trying for.

There are many people who bad mouth do not recommend the ECO Flo products. I use the dyes, highlighters, cova colors, and antiques and am pleased with them. I have used the "all in one" while helping a friend with a class and was not impressed with them, neither was my friend, a 17 year leather veteran. I think experimenting with the different products to find what fits your needs is the best practice. I still have a few products I want to try eventually, but for now the resolene and Eco Flo dyes work for me.

A thought on the "plastic" look. I think I may try the resolene mixed 25/75 with water to see if I can produce a satin finish with resolene.

Edited by radar67

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I think I still have a bottle left so I may try it again. I want to say I mixed it 50/50 but don't remember for sure. I think most would only use Montana pitch blend once they tried it. No I don't have any stock in the company I just have had super good luck with it working right out of the jar and have bought soo many products for leather that are junk so this one stands out.

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hi well i heard that mop and glo was good do i tryd it and belive it or not it work great, it seal it up and after buffing it , it come out qhit a nice sean to it

i go 50/50 ,wather and mop and glo

it cheap and it work

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I'm starting to go through the pains of figuring out dyes and finishes that work for me (have some spider webbing going on when I bend the leather after finishing), so I'm dredging through old posts for info.

Just had one noob question about this thread...When you say you use the Satin Shene "as a block for antiquing" what does that mean?

Thanks.

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I'm starting to go through the pains of figuring out dyes and finishes that work for me (have some spider webbing going on when I bend the leather after finishing), so I'm dredging through old posts for info.

Just had one noob question about this thread...When you say you use the Satin Shene "as a block for antiquing" what does that mean?

Thanks.

Hi Mike:

Satin Shene well resist the color from eco flo hi-lite or eco flo antiques. It will NOT resist the color from pro water stain or dyes. So be sure you know the difference.

The result is a two toned effect .

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So is it applied before you use the hi-lite and/or antique, then put the hi-lite over it?

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I'm sure that sounds like a stupid question, but I used antique gel then the shene as a finisher and didn't notice a difference to the darkness of the antique. I'm just not sure what I did wrong.

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I'm sure that sounds like a stupid question, but I used antique gel then the shene as a finisher and didn't notice a difference to the darkness of the antique. I'm just not sure what I did wrong.

Hi Mike:

The only stupid question is the one that remains unasked. So no worries ok?

The two tone affect is done by putting the shene on first in several thin layers allowing time to dry between. You want to be sure the shene is only in the areas you want to remain light such as a border or letters.

Then use your antique gel and make sure it is worked down into the carving and stamp work. and wipe the excess off.

Since you've already done this backwards... and have a uniformly antiqued piece that's finished with shene. The only thing you might be able to do at your own risk is dye carefully with an artist's brush through the shene.

I was tired last night so I neglected to find you the video from Tandy.

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Thanks Sylvia.

I love GH, he reminds me of Mr. Rogers. He just needs new theme music, or at least a little variety :)

I been using super shene on top of antiques, stains, dyes, etc (not in love with it btw) and after reading through some of the threads on this subject I ordered a bottle of reolene to try out. Will the resolene give me this effect also or do I need to use the super shene for the two tone effect?

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Will the resolene give me this effect also or do I need to use the super shene for the two tone effect?

He he he... GH is a cool old dude.

I really can't answer that since I've never used resolene. The only thing I can offer is to try it on a practice piece.

My supply of dyes and chemicals are limited and I chafe at having to buy yet another bottle of googah to use. LOL

I recently bought a quart bottle of "Fiebings #5 dye prep" for $16 plus shipping. When I got it it smelled just like ammonia. I shook it and it got sudsy. So I got online and looked up the safety sheet.

It's 90% water, and the rest is varying %s of ethol alcohol (clear booze), ammonia and "proprietary soap" What the?? So.... when I run out of this stuff I'm going to go buy a half gallon of Everclear 190 proof Booze, A bottle of Sudsy Ammonia from the $1 store and mix my own dang $16 bottle full of stuff and have enough to left over to make 40 more bottles. :evillaugh:

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LOL that sounds like a plan.

I just painted some shene on a bracelet. If it looks half as good as GH's does, I'm set!

Thanks for all the advice Sylvia.

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So much help here (at Leatherworker.net) and many different products to try and decide what is best for your different projects…

Since reading this I think I am going to get some Acrylic Resolene for the pieces I have that are colored and use up the

Super Shene & Satin Shene I have on un-dyed pieces…..

* Seems like I remember reading that a good way to put the Shene on - is to put on 2 really light coats when being used for the final finish.

I tried this with a small (3in x 3in) cotton rag and the leather had much less of a plastic look to it.

Dwight said above that "I use both Resolene and Bag Kote, . . . resolene 50/50 with water, . . . bag kote is 60/40, bag kote to water."

I never had read that these things could be diluted, so this is a great information. Same as with the Antique gel.

Not only does it last longer / go farther, you can also get many different shades of the color.

(Also – I suggest you don't 'Dump the Super Sheen down the drain'. :eusa_naughty:

Better to find a proper way to discard any chemicals, or give it to someone that can use it. ;)

This a 'How To' guide for 'Antiquing' Leather that was sent to me by Raymond Tipton from

BUNKHOUSE TOOLS He also has an auction site on eBay duckcreektraders.

post-15330-044559700 1332329252_thumb.jp

post-15330-078299600 1332329433_thumb.jp

post-15330-087161400 1332329585_thumb.jp

post-15330-046292000 1332330049_thumb.jp

post-15330-095402000 1332330169_thumb.jp

post-15330-043301800 1332330230_thumb.jp This is a box top I made using this guide.

First I put Super Shene on the horse because I wanted it to stay a lighter color.

Then I put diluted Fiebings Antique Saddle Tan on, because I wanted the surrounding area darker.

*. If you want the whole piece to be lighter, then put your resist on the entire piece, let it dry, and then add the antique.

You can go over it till it looks just right. let that dry and then put a Finish coat on.

*. Some times I want the leather a dark color so I will just use straight Antique Saddle Tan gel on the entire piece.

First I used Feibing dark brown # 124 on the horse and cross, let that dry and then the Antique Saddle Tan.

post-15330-074198400 1332331158_thumb.jp

That way I get the color I want and the antiquing

also gets into all of the border tooling. Let that dry and then add a finish to that.

Whether you use Super Shene, or Resolene for the resist, or finish with Bag kote… that is up to you.

Seems like everyone has their favorite products that work for them. Before you mess up your good piece - you could

test what you have in mind on a sample till you get your preferred results.

I hope this helps

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Bob, . . . you might try a product called Bag Kote, . . . another Feibings product.

It produces a much softer looking and feeling product without all the sheen.

I use both Resolene and Bag Kote, . . . resolene 50/50 with water, . . . bag kote is 60/40, bag kote to water.

I brush both on with a bristle brush, . . . that 1 inch wide, 49 cent, el cheapo, pure bristle brush, . . . then wash the brush out with soap and water. I lather it on fairly good, . . . making sure that each and every square inch is covered, . . . including the edges, . . . brush it , brush it, brush it, . . . back and forth, . . . up and down, . . . oblique left/down then right/down, . . . and keep brushing until all the bubbles are pretty well brushed out, . . . I then hit it VERY CAREFULLY with my heat gun to dry up any streaks that might try to form, . . .

If I want a high gloss finish, . . . using this priocess, . . . I usually have to do multiple coats.

I personally shy away from Bag Kote only because the ammonia (or something in it) aggravates my breathing, . . . but it is a good product.

With either one, . . . I then hang em up for 24 hours before I get serious about handling them.

May God bless,

Dwight

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I read your response above. I had finished a very time-consuming dyeing job and and last night was going to put resolene on to finish it. I hit the leather full on with the resolene. It streaked and went on thick. Ended up looking like glue. Ruinded a few days worth of work. Now that I know resolene should be watered down, it will hopefully make a difference in future projects. Quite disturbing that there are no instructons for use on the bottle.

Thanks for the info.

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do you apply gum tragacanth before or after sealing your leather to round the edges ? im asking because i noticed a great deal of dye, enough to reveal the natural color of the leather, was removed after i dyed the leather then applied gum tragacanth. thanks in advanced all :D !

If you use Tandy's ECO line of dyes/stains, you MUST use the ECO Gum Trag, not the regular Gum Trag. It will remove the dye/stain. Note: You can do that to get some cool "weathered" effects....I found that out the hard way. :)

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I've reading all these great recommendations,  I'm making coasters and I've used Feibing"s alcohol base dyes, sealing with Eco Flo Satin sheen, finishing with Tan Kote. I'm buffing in between each step. The problem is when it get water on them and you wipe it, the dye still comes off. I'd like to not have that! Any Suggestions??   

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This is a very old post but its suggestions are still good.  Find yourself some Resolene, dilute it 50:50 with water, and apply according to the instructions on the bottle.  Two diluted coats will work better and look nicer than one full strength coat.

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question: im wanting to dye my nice western show saddle to black.  do i go right to black from the light brown leather or should i do dark brown first then black?  and when i put the sealer on would i do the 50/50 still?      any help would be greatly appreciated.  as it would cost me over $500 to have someone else do this. where i see this would be less then $50 prob. 

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