thesergeant

Has Anyone Built Their Own Industrial Sewing Tables? --Can You Critique My Idea?

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No! 1st you have to beat yourself senseless with chains, kick the cat, pull your hair out, then run a triathlon. If your not doing things the hard way, your not doing it right!

Hahahahahaahahaha ... can't ... stop ... laughing !!!

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Just a little update on my sewing table project. I've installed my Consew 225 in it with a new Consew CSM1000 servo motor I got on eBay. I've been meaning to try a motor that has three separate parts - the motor, the controller, and the speed input. This allows putting the speed input on a movable pedal assembly with a wire connection instead of having it attached to the table directly with a fixed rod connection. It worked out quite nicely. All that's missing now is drip tray , a knee lift mechanism, and a bobbin winder.

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The previous owner of my Consew 225 power stand used brackets to make the stand mobile, but only raised the stand less than an inch. I don’t know where the brackets were sourced.

CD in Oklahoma

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Looking the last post had a few synapses firing and I realised I had these moving dolly wheels I got a Harbor Freight Tool for $3.99 which would work nicely on my latest table. Twenty minutes later my table was mobile :) The height change is minimal, if any, from the previous round metal feet pads. I'm not sure the wheels earn me any style points, but it'll surely be easier on my back when I need to move the machine.

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Good point carlosbruno, the wheels don't lock as they are. On a smooth tiled or linoleum floor the table would move quite easily. A carpet keeps it in place better, but not as solid as fixed legs or locking wheels. I may go with a hybrid solution, having wheels on just the heavier side, and regular feet on the other. I can still move the table around by myself easily by lifting just one side a little bit. This hybrid approach has the added benefit of allowing quick leveling of the desk on uneven surface like my slate tile floor.

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Didn't really build a sewing table, but modified it a lot after and accident with the original table. A friend of mine suggested I put the FERDCO Pro-2000 Saga at the leatherworker.net, so I did. Here is the story.

Bob Stelmack

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I was working on the flatbed sewing table attachment for my Adler 205-370 today and thought I'd share a few pictures from that project. None of the commercially available table attachments appealed to me so I decided to make my own, spending more effort and money than I probably should. It's all aluminum, made from two sandwiched aluminum plates that mount to the cylinder arm using existing threaded holes intended for attachments. The support plate is 5/8" thick. I made a CNC pattern and cut the plates using a WaterJet machine at my local TechShop. The project is not quite finished yet but I like where it's heading.

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For sure a nice work and It´s great when you have such opportunities. I guess you will put a clear coating on the surface, right? Anyway - for me it has a bit too technical look I personally prefer wood. But it still a nice work!

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Thanks Constabulary! I do plan to paint it, either white or a hammered gray to match the machine. The brushed aluminum surface is actually too shiny and scratches quite easily. The next version will have a plywood support plate and a painted or anodized metal top surface.

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Just an update on my flatbed table attachment for my Adler 205. I sanded the whole thing down to make smooth, rounded edges and painted it white. It installs in under a minute and is remarkably solid when attached to the cylinder arm by two countersunk screws, earning it a perfect score on my UCI scale (Uwe's confidence indicator) :)

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Copper legged table is finished! I ended up adding a cross brace to the back and it added quite a bit of stability, thank you for the suggestions to do that! I'm probably going to drill and rivet some of the joints/tubes in place for some additional security as well.

The top of the table is going to be walnut so I made a matching walnut foot pedal that is removable.

I'm still thinking about the best method to attach the table top. I'll update the thread when I figure it out.

The legs feel plenty strong with no real noticeable flex or give but they just don't have the heft of the steel legged table that I made previously. I picked up an o/a welding setup last week and am planning on make matching steel/walnut tables for the rest of our machines. This one is probably going to be the only copper legged setup and will be for a lighter duty machine, maybe our Bernina 950 or possibly our Bernina 217.

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Nice work on the copper table frame, Mr. Sergeant! I like the walnut pedal, too - it looks very classy.

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I just finished up some new table builds so I thought I'd share. Funny to see how far things have come since I first posted the thread wanting to use IKEA table tops. Thanks for all the inspiration, advice and motivation guys!

Here are a couple shots of the completed copper legged table for my Pfaff 130. It's a 'light duty' table suitable for only machines of this size (~50#) with a light servo motor.

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With the scrap left over from cutting down the table top from 25" to 20" I was able to veneer the table for my Singer 114W103. I took the 5" wide piece and resawed it down on my bandsaw. Extremely happy with the results on this one:

BEFORE:
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AFTER:
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Also, welded up some new legs for the bartacker and made a walnut top for that as well. I forgot to take 'after' photos but here it is before I welded feet on the bottom of the legs and then bolted on casters. I made it tall enough so the machine is used while standing. The foot is mounted to a block of walnut with rubber feet that you pull out from under the machine when you want to use it. The legs are pretty long so I'm considering adding a brace across the bottom for more stability.

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And finally, a vintage sewing machine display. Kee Klamp Industrial fittings, welded brackets and handmade box jointed walnut display boxes with 'matching' bookshelf:
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Edited by thesergeant

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I've been meaning to post pictures of my latest sewing table project to contribute to this nice collection of table ideas. I finally got around to making a CNC template for carving out a tabletop for my Consew 225. The legs came from a local University surplus store for $20 (same legs as a previous poster, haha). The wood is marine plywood and ran $45 for this project. The ShopBot CNC router machine is at my local TechShop playground for adults. The two plywood plates are glued, then screwed together, for a total thickness of 1.4 inches - just the right amount of overkill.

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Would you mind sharing the cnc files? I have a router and would like to make a bigger table myself. Why reinvent the wheel if someone has already done it. You have done some nice work on your machines.

Thanks, Chris.

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thesergeant: Those are beautiful tables! Love the veneered table to make use of the leftover pieces - you have some serious shop skills and a great eye for design and color! Now I'm all motivated to give my own Pfaff 130 a nice, permanent home like that rather than being hidden away in a cabinet. Nice photography, too.

cjsamples: I've uploaded the V-Carve Pro file for my Consew 225 table top here: http://uwe.net/CAD/Consew225_v2.crv

You'll have to tweak it to fit your hinge design and corner pads. You'll also have to separate out the top and bottom cutting paths for two shopbot runs.

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Apparently you have access to serious CNC equipment. I am drooling!

Just an update on my flatbed table attachment for my Adler 205. I sanded the whole thing down to make smooth, rounded edges and painted it white. It installs in under a minute and is remarkably solid when attached to the cylinder arm by two countersunk screws, earning it a perfect score on my UCI scale (Uwe's confidence indicator) :)

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Thanks for the file but my Aspire 3.0 wouldn't open it. I will look around and see if I can find something to convert it so I can read it. When I saw it was a .crv file I was.........Yippee!! then " Code 102 cannot open file".....grrrrr.

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cjsamples: Bummer about the file incompatibility. You could try downloading a trial version of V-Carve Pro to at least open the file and look at it and perhaps export to different format, but I'm not sure how limited the trial version is. I could send you the ShopBot code text file, but it's not really editable. I created the file in V-Carve Pro, so I don't really have another CAD version. Perhaps I can export to some standard AutoCad style DXF file, but I doubt it would not have the pathing info, which is important.

DrmCa: Yes, I do have access to very cool and wickedly expensive tools, but only if I pay my $150/month membership fee at TechShop (which I can afford only once every couple of months, unless people actually start buying stuff I make there, haha).

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I did download the trial version and it is pretty locked down as far as things you can do. I found a dimensional drawing from Juki for most of it but my machine has round attach points in the back so I will need to modify the file a little anyway.

I can set the run paths if you can export out a dxf file, I have a router here at the house.

Thanks, Chris.

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Here's a DXF export I did earlier today. It'll take some tweaking but it's a good starting point. Let's hope this works:

http://uwe.net/CAD/Consew225_v2.dxf

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Talk about overkill, you guys are dreaming up something that is totally unnecessary.

If you wish to make a top with laminate as a finished surface, obtain a piece or 4 x 8 foot sheet of particle board 1 1/8" thick. You can build an under carriage/leg set from 2 x 4's you can buy at Lowe's or HD if you like but the "H" set of legs available that are made for this purpose, I know your wife thinks they are ugly, has everything where it is supposed to be with no interference when you mount a motor, cut a belting hole, etc. You think that 11/8" particle board isn't heavy enough? I have three of them and I see absolutely no problem with any of them.

IMHO, Buy the "H" leg set and cover it with something that makes it look Industrial if you will.

BTW: If I put a table under one of my machines with that black pipe for legs my wife would make it disappear. LOL

ferg

Even better than p board, go to masonry products supplier and buy 1-1/8" form ply, way more stable.

Better yet, can order adjustable leg set and butcher block from Grizzly for around 300$ and all you need to do is wait for the delivery truck with your screw gun in hand...,

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When in need, I watch Craigslist for a homely example of a table that has the cutout ready for my target machine....you can often find a sound, straight but *ugly* top, complete with a K-leg stand (and even a used machine!) for close to the cost of your material list. I have bought damaged full sheets of Formica HPL for $8 to $25 from the local builder's supply, which can cover as many as 4 standard sized tables, depending.

A "laminate trimmer" router bit, some bondo if needed, flooring sandpaper, and a bit of contact cement puts you in business. I don't expect to see it on the cover of any magazines, however.

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-DC

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Sark, I'm guessing that the second photo is the "before"? Either that, or you've gone overboard with the "used look". :rofl:

My three used tables are a bit the worse for wear. I toyed with the idea of refurbishing them, but decided it was more trouble than it was worth.

Your idea of picking up a cheap one is actually a good one, and as you point out could be less than the materials required to build one from scratch.

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