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I'm still new and have been reading a lot of information since I started. Usually on posts about finishes, a 50/50 mix of Resolene is recommended. I've been very disappointed with Saddle-Lac due to cracking and the Leather Sheen I've tried isn't very durable. So after reading all those posts over the last few weeks, I went in to pick up some Resolene. 

The employees there, all three of them, said it was terrible, don't buy it, it will ruin everything you put it on, etc. That's obviously not the case since so many people here use it, so what gives?  Is it just difficult to work with? 

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TomG   

Only if you put it on wrong.

50/50 mix with water.  2 or 3 light coats, allowing it to dry between coats.  On straps, I flex them a little as they dry.. about 30 second or so.. just until they aren't "wet".

 

Tom

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nrk   

hmm

what about slicing OFF of those resolene coats after time and usage? anyone facing?

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OLDNSLOW   

Not sure what ( slicing off ) is, but the advise I was given when I bought my first bottle was that it would streak when applied especially at full strength, as a newbie I did apply it full strength a few times but I now use it at a 50/50 or less dilution and also airbrush it on with multiple coats.  I would think that if it was bad other major retailers and whole sellers of the product would either not sell it or sell it with major disclaimers to go along with it, and I would think that Tandy would not sell it.  But I doubt that is the case, not to knock Tandy but sometimes or at least I am getting the impression that the employees are not the sharpest tack in the box.   

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First of all, if Resolene is applied properly (and this holds true for ALL products) then there are no issues with it.  Second of all, it responds the same way as the Eco-Flo acrylic (or other like items) does and does not have a wear-off risk, which is what I think NRK is asking about.  Again, this all depends on whether or not it was properly applied and allowed to properly set/cure as instructions indicate.

Regarding the Tandy intelligence factor?  They are not in the business of truly knowing about the trade and the products used, they are just taught to sell their products and find fault with all of the others that are on the market.  Kind of funny considering that when the Tandy brand first came to life their main product line of dyes, stains, and finishes was in fact the Fiebing's product line; now that they are a corporate monster and have their own (not really theirs because it is made by Fenice of Italy) "branded" product line everyone else is garbage.  I have used Fiebing's since the late 70's and have yet to find any comparable replacement or competition for them.  I invest my business dollars with the names that I know and trust and have done so since I first got the bug.

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Ah, I wonder if the airbrush thing is why they advised against it. I don't have an airbrush and they know that. 

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Dwight   

You can tell them for me (and I would suppose, a LARGE majority of the folks on here) that they should stick to running the cash register, . . . they obviously do not know much about leather or leather working.

I have used Resolene for a number of years, . . . it works first time, . . . every time, . . . does a great job on my belts, and holsters, and knife sheaths, and gun bags, and purses, and billfolds, . . . and I probably missed a few things.

Yes, . . . it does take a bit of getting used to as far as using it correctly, . . . but once you catch on, . . . there is nothing out there in it's league, . . . everything else is on a lower ladder rung.

I normally brush it on with a 1 inch pig hair bristle brush, . . . but I have sponged it on, . . . air brushed it, . . .  and dipped it.  

They're retail counter people, . . . would probably cry if they had to try to work for a living.

May God bless,

Dwight

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nrk   
8 hours ago, NVLeatherWorx said:

First of all, if Resolene is applied properly (and this holds true for ALL products) then there are no issues with it.  Second of all, it responds the same way as the Eco-Flo acrylic (or other like items) does and does not have a wear-off risk, which is what I think NRK is asking about.  Again, this all depends on whether or not it was properly applied and allowed to properly set/cure as instructions indicate.

 

exactly. i meant stratify over a time of usage. 

however, i still can't get those results you guys talking about )

i will try again and share with you.

 

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Resolene is either the best product for finishing leather, or the worst, depending on who you ask.  I personally have experienced both amazing results and terrible ones.  If you wipe it on at 100% strength it will not flatten when it dries and leave you with a streaky mess.  A 50/50 or 60/40 mix will allow the product to flow evenly over the leather and dry to a flat film giving you a smooth glossy surface.  Use light coats and don't fuss with it until it is dry.  Resolene really shines when it sprayed on.  I use an small hvlp spray gun. 

Be sure to do a test piece.  I have had experienced an "oil and water" reaction when I applied it over Fieblings Low VOC dye and even spraying it on I got splotchy coverage.      

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alyshae   

I’ve used it on everything, including bridles that are still looking good at four years.  My lesson horse uses the first one I made with no cracking, peeling or yellowing, so I get to track it!  Like everyone says, 50:50 dilution, several light coats, unidirectional swipes, not circular, and I use a sponge.  It is a bit of an art but I find it worth it. 

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Bodean   

I just bought a big bottle of the pro resist by Fiebing's. Haven't used it yet, but was wondering if it is the same as resolene? Sure looks like it.

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alpha2   

Once I learned to first SERIOUSLY dry and buff any die or stain, or paint for that matter, I've used it exclusively. If you don't dry and buff before finish, it can and will remove at least some of the color. I spray it on in multiple coats to prevent the "fish-eye" you can get with other methods of application. 

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The knowledge of the staff varies from store to store. I've found the Tandy store I deal with has some VERY knowledgeable people. The guy who teaches the leatherworking classes is by far the most knowledgeable, and he does NOT like Resolene. He said it peels and cracks, and recommended Tandy's Super Sheen.  But I'm willing to bet Resolene only has that problem if you don't dilute it.

He's not just trying to push Tandy products, though. He told me Fiebing's Pro dye was by far the best, when I was having trouble with Tandy's Eco Flo products. And he was right.

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I'm also a diluter and airbrusher. It has worked well in my experience. If you think you might be using Resolene, or even acrylic paint with some regularity, an airbrush might be worth looking into. I have an Iwata that cost about $300 for both the brush and the compressor. A lot of people on this forum also swear by Harbor Freight brushes that probably cost a lot less though. And if either of those aren't in the budget right now, you could also try something like this: https://www.tandyleather.com/en/product/preval-power-unit. It's not quite as smooth and controlled as a real airbrush, but it's not as heavy as paint brush or a dauber either.

Also, if you want a good overview of finishes, this video is fairly helpful: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zyTg_hfpNUM

Edited by strathmoredesigns

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mikesc   

If you want to use an airbrush ..paasche VLS
http://leatherworker.net/forum/topic/77951-airbrush-compressor-question/?do=findComment&comment=516003

What you will be spraying is water soluble ( actually it isn't soluble, it is more "miscible", hence the "milkyness" ) acrylic resin..

Poly(methyl methacrylate-co-ethylacrylate)2-propanol..is what is in tandy and fiebings and a whole host of other things..including a clear sealer for sheetrock sold in Europe as "stop fond".

msds for resolene ( tells you exactly what is in it )..msds for anything tells you way more than what is on the label..or what the person behind the counter selling it or its competitor product knows about what is in there.

HTH :)

Btw ..if you buy this kind of resin as sheetrock sealer for use to seal the sheetrock prior to painting it. you'll pay way less per litre than if you buy it with a fancy brand name for sealing leather or for "varnishing" acrylic paintings

What you look for is "Poly(methyl methacrylate-co-ethylacrylate)2-propanol"..and "water based"..one could use a more volatile "petrochemical" type solvant for it as well, ( and some products do just that ) but water based is safer.

Edited by mikesc

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alpha2   
4 hours ago, Sheilajeanne said:

The knowledge of the staff varies from store to store. I've found the Tandy store I deal with has some VERY knowledgeable people. The guy who teaches the leatherworking classes is by far the most knowledgeable, and he does NOT like Resolene. He said it peels and cracks, and recommended Tandy's Super Sheen.  But I'm willing to bet Resolene only has that problem if you don't dilute it.

He's not just trying to push Tandy products, though. He told me Fiebing's Pro dye was by far the best, when I was having trouble with Tandy's Eco Flo products. And he was right.

I used to use Super Sheen exclusively, before I went to Fiebings spray before moving to Resolene. Anything will crack if applied too thick, and without drying between coats. To make the blanket statement that Resolene will crack, doesn't hold up to the many thousands of saddle makers and leatherworkers that use it exclusively, without it cracking. Light coats. Numerous coats. Dry and buff...repeat. It's leather science, not rocket science!

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mikesc   

I used to use Super Sheen exclusively, before I went to Fiebings spray before moving to Resolene. Anything will crack if applied too thick, and without drying between coats. To make the blanket statement that Resolene will crack, doesn't hold up to the many thousands of saddle makers and leatherworkers that use it exclusively, without it cracking. Light coats. Numerous coats. Dry and buff...repeat. It's leather science, not rocket science!


It is actually "applied organic chemistry". ;)

Agree with you entirely :)..it is all about how the chemistry ( or chemical product ) is applied.

Edited by mikesc

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alpha2   

No problem! I have the same lack of formal education in each of those! 

Wait, there was that one time that applied organic chem might have been in play...Nah! Probably not!

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YinTx   
On 11/4/2017 at 7:58 AM, Bodean said:

I just bought a big bottle of the pro resist by Fiebing's. Haven't used it yet, but was wondering if it is the same as resolene? Sure looks like it.

I have heard that it works well, and I have been curious to try it out myself, so I'd like to live vicariously through you if I may.  Since you now have it, please let us know how it works out, and post photos along the way!  Much appreciated!

YinTx

 

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