MikePatterson

CHAMPION LOCKSTITCH SHOE MACHINE

13 posts in this topic

I thought some of you would enjoy seeing my pride and joy, conversation piece of my shop. I bought this old machine back in the early 70's. From what I can find out about the machine it was built in the early 1900's. As you can see in the photos the machine still has the three pedals and the old tractor style seat as it came from the factory. It still has the wax pot attached although it has not been used in years since nylon thread. It is still powered manually and since it will easily sew through over 1 inch of heavy leather I have never wanted to put a motor on it. The machine has served me well for over 30 years and has been used daily and is still in use at this time. I have had to make a few parts as they have become very hard to find and anytime I could find parts I bought them and put them back in case I needed them later. The old machine has a awl that comes down from the top and punches a hole for the hook needle to come up through from the bottom. A lock stich is tied and the cycle repeats. I have several machines in the shop but when I need to get serious I get in the old tractor seat and start to pedal. If anyone can tell me anything about these old machines or would happen to have any parts please let me know.

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Edited by Johanna

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WOW! That's a monster! Nice machine

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I love it! At work we had a Campbell that I painted yellow in the hopes that it would reflect a little more light than the dark blue. I still used linen and wax, it made the most beautiful stitch and you didn't have to worry about anything coming apart.

Then in the late nineties, customers started whining "I want the thread to match the leather". So in 2000, I said lets at least come into the twentieth century, so we got an Adler 205. Yeah, I guess its easier to change thread colors and it has reverse, but I don't EVER look at the stitch and think "that is pretty, I'd like to just see that stitch on something" like I did with the Campbell.

But what I want to know is, Why three pedals?

And what is holding up that seat? Surely not just that 1/4 inch rod.

Merry Christmas everybody,

Kevin

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the seat is just held up by the 1/2" rod and it slides from side to side depending on how large the project you are sewing is and you can use any of the three pedals depending on where you are sitting.

Thanks Mike

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100_1204.JPGglad to see someone using a champion stitcher,i have been using mine for 40 years for saddles,harness and holsters it still sews good. it has a foot clutch and can sew very slow, yours is a good looking machine

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Gloomis, that blue machine looks like a Singer 98k52 patcher. How's that workin' for ya? I have one that I struggle with, but it works.

Daggrim

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Daggrim,The patch machine is a Singer 29k171 it has a motor that goes way to fast,so I use the hand wheel.I only use it for making a cell phone case or something very lite weight. I would like to get a treadle for it

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Mine has a treadle, but until I get more adept, I find myself using the handwheel often to get more control for odd curves.

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awesome machine Mike! I have the perfect spot for it if you ever want it to have a new home. LOL very cool!

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Have you sewed any boot soles with it? I've got a chance to buy one. Still on the factory pedestal, with a motor. Kicking it around because I'd like to do some resoles, but want to get a machine that will let me do that and some tack to.

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Hi Mike my name is Al. I saw your old post and photos and wanted to talk to you about your Champion machine. I just picked the exact machine up at an auction and was hopeing i could pick your brain. I know very little about it. Year? Manual availability? Access to parts? Posable value? Your picture is the only one i have found that looks exactly like the one i have. Except i have no seat and mine needs a little cleaning and posable tune up. I would really apprciate any info you can share? Thanks Al

Hi Mike my name is Al. I saw your old post and photos and wanted to talk to you about your Champion machine. I just picked the exact machine up at an auction and was hopeing i could pick your brain. I know very little about it. Year? Manual availability? Access to parts? Posable value? Your picture is the only one i have found that looks exactly like the one i have. Except i have no seat and mine needs a little cleaning and posable tune up. I would really apprciate any info you can share? Thanks Al

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I acquired one of these recently as an amateur to the industry. Was a complete rust bucket mostly on the outside. I worked a little every night to clean and free up the pieces and parts. I feel I saved it just in time because most of the tolerances seem to be ok for what I know..considering I have had to build some of my own parts and figure this out with very little available info. I was wondering if there was any clearance or adjustment specs out there to help me fine tune this recovered gem? Wish someone would've posted a video on youtube. The only one I found wouldn't play for me. I have it stitching by hand but finding needles has been tuff. I have had to craft my own so far. Any advice or info would be highly appreciated and rewarded with karma.

Thanks for your wisdom and pics above. Huge help to me when fabricating my pieces!!

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Try Pilgrim Machine for literature. They may even have the Operator Manual.

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