Steve75

Edge Bevelers

Recommended Posts

Steve75   

What type and brand edge bevelers are you guys using?  I am currently using Tandy Keen Edge Bevelers and have found they are not user friendly when beveling a corner or a tight radius.  Any insight given is appreciated.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a craftool pro and a few others depending on thickness of piece.

Have you sharpened it?

I sharpen mine like this.

Bevel the edge and rub stropping compound on the edge. Then just run your beveller backwards over it several times.

Hope this helps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
TonyRV2   

Are you wetting the edge before beveling?  That, as well as a well stropped tool should help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You should wet before you bevel? That's the first I've heard of that.

Thanks.

Should I be wetting before I sand as well?

Edited by bikermutt07

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
TonyRV2   

Just like tooling, it makes the leather softer and easier to cut.  You don't want to soak the leather, I just use a spray bottle and spritz it.  I should point out that I do knife sheaths and work with 8 or 9 ounce veg tan leather.   I suppose like many other things it becomes a matter of preference.  ymmv

As far as sanding, I think you want to just leave the edges dry for that and then of course wet it down with something like trag or saddle soap for burnishing.

Edited by TonyRV2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks. Only 8 a.m. and I already learned something new today.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
zuludog   

I use a Tandy Craftool Edge Beveller number 3 on mostly 3 to 3,5mm veg tan leather. If I was using thinner leather more often I would probably get a No 1 or No 2. This is how I sharpen it

Strop the outside curve on my strop used for all my knives & tools. I use a home made strop and Veritas Green compound, O5M08.01

Then I fix the beveller at a suitable angle in a bench vice with soft jaws ; load about 18"/45cm of my normal sewing thread -  18/3 linen - with the same honing compound, and pull the loaded thread through the beveller 3 or 4 times - from the handle towards the tip. Then clean up the end of the tool with a thin cloth

This is more or less the same as the method shown in this video - www.how to sharpen an edge beveller by scarou 022. It's in French but simple enough to follow

this is good - www.sharpening an edge beveller by AK Workshops

If you use an edge beveller that has a groove or guide on the undersurface, ie the outside curve, this video is good - www.how to sharpen an edge beveller by lb custom knives

Besides these there are several other related videos; the more you watch, the more you learn.

So far I've only used my beveller on dry leather, but on the strength of this thread I'll try dampened leather in future

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
YinTx   

I have been using the Tandy edge beveler, but I have not been very happy with it since it just makes a squared off edge now with two corners to sand smooth.  I came across these other two bevelers in the pile of old tools I had bought, but they are in pretty rough shape.  My impression, right or wrong, is that these will cut a rounded corner, instead of a chamfered bevel.  But one appears to have been cut through on the business edge, likely by oversharpening with a rouge loaded thread, and the other is pitted pretty bad.  My question is, can these be saved, or do I have to go get another $40 tool for each weight of leather I work with?  and if these don't cut a rounded edge, can someone tell me what will?  Thanks much!

EdgeBeveler1LoRes.jpg

 

EdgeBeveler3LoRes.jpg

 

EdgeBeveler2LoRes.jpg

 

 

 

YinTx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gmace99   

 

My edge strip is a dixons as is most of my tools

Edited by gmace99

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Red Cent   

He needs to get that translated to EnglishB)

 

I draw my cheap Tandy bevelers (3 & 4) across 1000 grit on a board  a couple of times. On the other side of the board is another strip of 1000 with red rouge smeared on it. I push the beveler through the rouge, with some downward pressure, around 4-6 times and wipe off. Cuts great. Bianchi would not be pleased, though. You can hear the beveler cut the leather.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gmace99   

People in the UK can understand my English Red.  I also never get a problem when I am teaching in America, India, Argentina, France, Holland etc. It might not be the same version that you use. Then again we the British did let you use our language. It can't be our fault If you don't use it with a nice Scottish brogue. 

 

(Ps . I hate text it can make people sound as if they are bitching.  I'm having a laugh)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Boriqua   
On 9/9/2016 at 9:15 PM, Steve75 said:

What type and brand edge bevelers are you guys using?  I am currently using Tandy Keen Edge Bevelers and have found they are not user friendly when beveling a corner or a tight radius.  Any insight given is appreciated.  

I have the same exact problem ... it aint you and it aint that the tool isnt sharp. Well I dont know that since I havent tried your tools but my edge beveler is sharp and whisks through leather .... so long as it is a straight line. I have 2 of the newer Tandy edgers and I have one of the old ones. old old like I got it with a kit in the early 90's.

I posted a few pix below. You can see that the newer (black) one is a chunk of steel at the end. It is perhaps 2.5 times larger top to bottom than my old edger. The old edger tapers to a fine curved tip and the opening gets progressively wider as it goes forward. So while it is a #2 edger the very ends of the 2 prongs are further apart than the actual cutting notch. you will also notice it has an inward curve on the outer edges. Oh my how useful for edging leather of various thicknesses instead of having a large blunt end. So it tapers outward, curves up and curves in !!

That is a well designed tool!! Wow .. really well thought out.

I used that tool for YEARS and would whisk around inside turns. I wanted to get a slightly larger size so I bought a new # 3 and its awful. Anytime I try an inside curve one of the prongs digs right into the leather. I pointed an arrow at what I think the culprit is. Besides being super thick and crude there seems to be a little katana sword edge that sticks out from the front. what a weird place to put a bevel on that tool but there it is right where it will dig in the leather. I have been following the thread hoping someone would make some good suggestions on a replacement. Getting that bevel right is worth a few dollars and I will pay a fair price if the tool is good but am afraid of spending the money without knowing. The New tandy round bevelers just SUCK!

I may try some careful creative grinding because as it stands the new Tandy edger is damn near worthless to me.

DSCF5877sm.JPG

DSCF5880sm.JPG

DSCF5881sm.JPG

DSCF5888sm.JPG

DSCF5876sm.JPG

DSCF5882sm.JPG

Edited by Boriqua

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've heard good things about the Jeremiah Watt interchangeable blade beveler.  Cheap at something like $45 a full set and usably sharp out of the box.   Haven't tried them for myself yet, but they're on my buy list.

Bill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Boriqua   

Found an informative video from one of our own. Thinking maybe an osborne ... see how he mentions lifting the toe. Was easy breezy with the old tandy edger but just cannot be done with the newer style ....  I have tried.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
YinTx   

The middle tool in the photos I show is a CS Osborne 133, just like the one that Bruce is showing in his video.  I like what it does, but it needs to be rescued.  Anyone know the best way to recover the damaged edge?

YinTx

p.s., its not an issue of sharpening, more like reshaping if you look closely at the opening, it is uneven.

YinTx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All cutting tools need to be properly sharpened to work well, kind of basic law - period. Low quality tools only means that you need to strop/sharpen more often, while better quality tools last longer in between. Pricier tools does not mean better quality. Everyone has personal preferences so the real only way to find out what works for you is to first try things out. Amazing how many people that actually forget that part. Also, rarely one tool covers everything.

I have plenty of Craftool and Ivan (for a while in the past Craftool had most of their tools made by Ivan company in Taiwan) bevelers and they are perfect in my busy studio where the tools change hands many times and often get dropped on the floor etc. But then when I do a custom project with especially softer leather and smaller items with refined edges, I bring out my 'branded' bevelers, however, it is still all depending on the project - and that dictates the tool - not the other way around.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I take a run at all my tools with needle files and a buffer on a dremel.  Bevelers and creasers especially.  There is always a ridge, point or bad curve somewhere, and they can always use a polish to glide better. I make tools as well. Check this one out, it is made from a screwdriver.  It is both a beveler or a creaser depending on which way you run it, I included  pictures of both. It is in the #3-4 size range.

Works great as a stitch ripper as well. Just slip it between the layers and go to town.

edger 001.jpgedger 2.jpgedger 3.jpgedger 4.jpgedger 6.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Boriqua   

Hey That is a nice looking tool there Tinker!

I have a question ... some edgers are listed in sizes like 1,2,3,4 and I am now finding some measured in inches. I have only ever bought them by number .. does anyone know what a 2,3 measure out to in inches?

Alex

Found the answer and posted a link for anyone else that is looking. Now to figure out the difference between the common edger and the western edger

 

http://www.csosborneleathertools.com/product_detail.php?p_id=177

Edited by Boriqua

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thor   
16 hours ago, YinTx said:

The middle tool in the photos I show is a CS Osborne 133, just like the one that Bruce is showing in his video.  I like what it does, but it needs to be rescued.  Anyone know the best way to recover the damaged edge?

YinTx

p.s., its not an issue of sharpening, more like reshaping if you look closely at the opening, it is uneven.

YinTx

Yin some not so bright person must have used a jewelers file to sharpen it and of course the diameter was wrong. You will have to bring the large groove that same distance back and re-polish the edge. You can either use sandpaper on a whatever matches the diameter of that groove or find a file that diameter. CSO sends sharpening tools with there edgers and bevelers. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Steve75   
On Monday, September 12, 2016 at 4:10 PM, Boriqua said:

I have the same exact problem ... it aint you and it aint that the tool isnt sharp. Well I dont know that since I havent tried your tools but my edge beveler is sharp and whisks through leather .... so long as it is a straight line. I have 2 of the newer Tandy edgers and I have one of the old ones. old old like I got it with a kit in the early 90's.

I posted a few pix below. You can see that the newer (black) one is a chunk of steel at the end. It is perhaps 2.5 times larger top to bottom than my old edger. The old edger tapers to a fine curved tip and the opening gets progressively wider as it goes forward. So while it is a #2 edger the very ends of the 2 prongs are further apart than the actual cutting notch. you will also notice it has an inward curve on the outer edges. Oh my how useful for edging leather of various thicknesses instead of having a large blunt end. So it tapers outward, curves up and curves in !!

That is a well designed tool!! Wow .. really well thought out.

I used that tool for YEARS and would whisk around inside turns. I wanted to get a slightly larger size so I bought a new # 3 and its awful. Anytime I try an inside curve one of the prongs digs right into the leather. I pointed an arrow at what I think the culprit is. Besides being super thick and crude there seems to be a little katana sword edge that sticks out from the front. what a weird place to put a bevel on that tool but there it is right where it will dig in the leather. I have been following the thread hoping someone would make some good suggestions on a replacement. Getting that bevel right is worth a few dollars and I will pay a fair price if the tool is good but am afraid of spending the money without knowing. The New tandy round bevelers just SUCK!

I may try some careful creative grinding because as it stands the new Tandy edger is damn near worthless to me.

DSCF5877sm.JPG

DSCF5880sm.JPG

DSCF5881sm.JPG

DSCF5888sm.JPG

DSCF5876sm.JPG

DSCF5882sm.JPG

I apologize for the vagueness of my original post.  I have read the posts and yours spells out the issue nicely.  I don't like that I am not able to use my bevelers on tight corner, especially inside corners.  

I appreciate all the advice on how to sharpen the bevelers.  It is good knowledge.  I also have Stohlman's book on leather tools and how to sharpen them.

Just looking for recommendations on which bevelers perform well in addressing tight corners without gouging the leather.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Boriqua   

I just ordered the weaver mastertools #2 edger and will report back what I think. It is reported to have the shortest legs of the many I looked at and the price was in the middle of the pack. I hope it will arrive this week and I will give it a go and see what I think

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Boriqua   

Alright back with a report... So far .. the Weaver Mastertools Edger is AWESOME!

It came ready to go to work right from the package. Nice .. I still hit it with  a little rouge but mostly because I am insane. It is effortless to use on the 8.9 oz shoulder I have and I also used it on some softish 5/6. Worked great. It has very short legs so is perfect for inside turns. I have edged the inside of a curve that was about the diameter of a quarter and it was a dream with no legs diving into and ruining the leather. Just a nice smooth bevel all the way around. I was able to bevel inside of a 10.5mm diameter hole at the end of a belt slot. Took a little doing but no scaring.

The tool is very pretty and the handle is a bit wider than I have ever used but is actually very nice at about 37mm in Diameter where the Tandy is about 24mm. One of those things I didnt know I would want but now that I tried it it feels perfect. I think they say they use maple but whatever it is the tool feels light.

The size of it makes me think it will be heavier but it weighs in at 1 3/8 ounces. So hence my only concern ... It is without ferule and in a lighter weight wood, so time will tell regarding durability. If you need to bear down on it then its not sharp enough so that may never become an issue.

The steel is far thicker than I thought it might be. All the pictures made me think it was almost sheet steel thin but this is a good chunk of what looks like forged steel at 2.7mm thick. The legs are beveled in on the outsides so you can get close to your work and it gives it a broader range of leather thicknesses it can work through. My #3 tandy keen edge was virtually worthless on anything less than 8/9oz. Its nice to be able to use this on a wider range. I still will be ordering a Weaver #1 though when I put in my leather order.

The tip is nicely polished over round so little to dig into your leather work. I posted a bunch of pix so you can get a better sense of it. I am thrilled! Time will tell regarding the ferule'less design and how well the steel holds an edge. Unfortunately I am somewhat of a serial stropper and usually pass my tools on some rouge impregnated leather after each use a few times so my tools rarely get dull so it may be difficult for me to weigh in on edge retention. The tool looks like a one off hand made tool in the best possible sense. It was more than the osborne but less than say a Jeremiah. So far .. worth every penny.

 

DSCF5916sm.JPG

DSCF5918sm.JPG

DSCF5919sm.JPG

DSCF5922sm.JPG

DSCF5924sm.JPG

DSCF5925sm.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice review, thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joon1911   
On September 10, 2016 at 0:15 AM, Steve75 said:

What type and brand edge bevelers are you guys using?  I am currently using Tandy Keen Edge Bevelers and have found they are not user friendly when beveling a corner or a tight radius.  Any insight given is appreciated.  

I use Barry King and Ron's Tools bevellers.  Both make excellent tools and work well for different situations.  I use the Barry King grooved edgers for most edging duties, anything with curvy edges.  I also have a couple sharp curve edger that are used inside slots and punched holes.  The Ron's edger is one of the Round Edge edgers and it gives me the best edge cut bar none along very straight and slightly curved edges, primarily because the Ron's edger has a really long base, it doesn't really like to go around tight turns to well.

As for the issue with beveling around a tight radius, in my experience that is more an issue of technique as opposed to the tool.  When I first started out, I used the Tandy bevellers and found they were sufficient to do the job just as well as the more expensive tools.  Don't be afraid to modify the tools to your liking, especially if they are inexpensive like the basic Tandy ones.

Definitely wet your edges prior to edging, it goes a long way.  I used a small sponge to wet the edge as opposed to a spray bottle.  I find I can control the application pretty well to limit the water to the edge being cut.

I strop the same way as bikermutt... my strop has several different cuts from the various edgers and I use the stropping compound on those edges to strop the bottoms of the edgers.  Hope this is helpful.

Here's a couple pics of the edgers:

Top one is the Ron's round edge edger, middle is Barry King grooved, and bottom is the BK sharp curve edger.  Next pic shows the bottoms in the same order.

large.IMG_6027.JPGlarge.IMG_6028.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Joon1911   
On September 12, 2016 at 7:18 PM, billybopp said:

I've heard good things about the Jeremiah Watt interchangeable blade beveler.  Cheap at something like $45 a full set and usably sharp out of the box.   Haven't tried them for myself yet, but they're on my buy list.

Bill

I haven't tried them out personally but Nigel Armitage did a review of these on his Youtube channel and he thought they were a great value and worked well

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now