DamnearaFarm

Curiculum for Kids' Classes?

6 posts in this topic

I need to come up with lesson plans for beginner leather craft classes. I'll be teaching kids ages 8-12, approx. 10 lessons total.  Any suggestions? Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How long is each class and what do you have for a budget?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tandy has some odds and ends (free lesson plans) in their leathercraft library.  Might be able to selectively adapt them to your needs.

Tom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Each class will run about an hour, maybe an hour & 15 minutes. Initial budget will be $150-$200. I have a business account at Tandy, so that amount should get me enough supplies for a while if I get group packs. This was kinda sprung on me today :)

Tom...I'll check that out tonight, thanks!

Edited by DamnearaFarm
adding comment

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think what I would do is to buy a 5lb or so bag of scraps to use to teach them basic skills to start off.  You could have them do some simple tooling at first, and lead them into geometric tooling, like basketweave or other similar tools.  This could take up 2 or 3 classes easily, and I'm assuming you have all of the tools already.  Another two or three classes could be spent on stitching and lacing methods.  You can also discuss and demonstrate dying and finishing leather and if you're gutsy, give them all latex gloves and some daubers and let them dye a few pieces of scrap.  All the while, and eye should be kept on the prize so to speak, a capstone project of some kind perhaps put together with ready made kits since I doubt you want 10 year olds messing around with swivel knives, round knives or other sharp instruments.  Between the basic skills that you'd be teaching, along with a capstone project, you should have no problem filling 10 lessons.  

Start by coming up with an estimate for how long it will take the kids to finish their final project and then work backwards from there to decide how much time you want to devote to basic skills as well as which skills you want to discuss with them.  Most importantly above all, you should have fun with it, and so should the kids.

Edited by TonyRV2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Let me add my observations from the few times I've spent teaching Boy Scouts (not Cub Scouts) leather craft:

As a whole, It's difficult for them to design their own pieces (i.e. make a design, transfer it to leather, cut it out, and tool it). Pre-cut leather projects and designs are the way to go. TonyRV2s advice about scrap bags and a capstone project is excellent advice.

The basic foundations of tooling (beveler, backgrounder, shader, etc.) are good topics, but keep the designs simple.Your average learn to tool books seem to think that fancy, traditional floral work is the basics of leather craft. I remember doing that in 7th grade shop (back in the 70s), but I didn't really care for the style or understand how the tools contributed to the design. (I still have and use a luggage tag made from that class! I've certainly come a LONG way since then!) I don't have or use veiners or camoflage tools, but I would treat them as stamps for this group, and show them how the tool can be tilted and struck lighter or harder to change the look.

I think that the time and care it takes to stitch leather pieces together(over 15 minutes) is too much for the average kid. You'll get the odd one out who can focus long enough, but it's a repetitive task that isn't very interesting. Lacing is going to be faster and easier, but both lacing and stitching are topics for older or more advanced students, or the one person who really gets into the work. Riveting, if possible, may be the way to go.

I have heard advice that when doing leather craft with kids this age that it is better to not use brushed-on dye to color projects. Instead, use colored Sharpie permanent markers-- no spillage, a lot less cleanup, and easy/cheap to replace.
I haven't tried this myself, so I can't tell you how well it works. I must confess that I have used a fine line black Sharpie marker on some leather pieces, to make very thin black lines. It worked just fine, and has been colorfast so far.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now