tardis86

pricking iron under $200?

25 posts in this topic

can anyone recommend  a pricking iron that is under the $200 range that isn't total garbage? I believe it when people say that its worth the price, but i just cant justify that price point right now, not this early in my learning.

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I got a few from Tandy and Springfield. They were inexpensive, and work just fine. Had them for a while now.

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pricking iron or diamond chisel?

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Diamond point chisels... aren't they the same? I have heard the names go both ways.

 

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Nevermind, I did a search, and after a few places, found one that defined the differences. What I have are the chisels, not the pricking iron.

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since the pricking irons are not used to actually make holes, why not use the over stitch wheels? heck of a lot cheaper

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Posted (edited)

I would recommend these cheap pricking irons.  http://www.ebay.com/itm/381844508945?_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649&var=650844991809&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT
$15 is well below $200 so even if you dont like them you haven't lost much.

here they cost a bit more but also have 3mm and 2,7 mm http://www.ebay.com/itm/182290339219?_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649&var=484831121068&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT

I wrote about them here: http://andersenleather.blogspot.com/2016/08/dont-waste-your-money-on-expensive.html

Edited by jonasbo

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Are you wanting pricking iron or stitching chisels? 

There is a difference.  The good thing is you can use stitching chisels as pricking irons.  Goods Japan has good ones, Wutah sells on ebay.  GoodnLeather, Amy Ranoke but there is a waiting period. Bruce Johnson Leather will have some vintage pricking irons on his website.

Ebay does have various Chinese manufactured that will work.  They will usually be in metric measurerments that you will need to convert to stitches per inch.  There options out there for inexpensive pricking irons/chisels.

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Nigel Armitage has a great video on youtube about pricking irons.  I highly suggest taking a look at it. 

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I saw a nice review on the wuta picking irons. I would buy them. I have had good dealings with them on their templates.

It does take awhile to ship from China, but they are up front about that.

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If you are looking for diamond chisels take a look at this guys...under $200 shipped

http://www.crimsonhides.com/craft-tools.html

Here is a review of those particular irons too

 

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On ‎1‎/‎4‎/‎2017 at 7:01 PM, Halitech said:

since the pricking irons are not used to actually make holes, why not use the over stitch wheels? heck of a lot cheaper

Quality of sewing.  If you just want your pieces to stay together they are great.  If you want precisely placed stitches an iron will do that.  The length of the iron makes sure all of the stitches are exactly in line with the others.  Very straight, concise, quality.

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the one I have, if there is a difference in the spacing, it's not enough that you can tell by eye. Having said that, I prefer my chisels over the wheel unless I can't use the chisels

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One big advantage of a pricking iron over an overstitch wheel is that the pricking iron helps guide the angle of your awl so that you get a nearly perfect angled hole every time - especially if your awl has a broader tip rather than extremely pointy. (Think a broadsword tip as opposed to a rapier tip in sword terms).  There is no guidance using an overstitch wheel, so your hand awl work has to be more precise and disciplined.  A stitching chisel can come close to a pricking iron in that awl guidance, if you don't use it to punch all the way through.. And if you go all the way through with them, they work great as long as they don't make huge gaping holes as some do.

Bill

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Don't know if anyone recommended these yet...

 

image.png

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I second the recommendation to watch Nigel Armitage's youtube video where he reviews a bunch of different pricking irons.  I have the diamond hole punches from leathercrafttools, and I couldn't be happier with them.  They produce a really nice stitch and don't produce large holes.  I only have the 6 prong and 2 prong for each spi.

 

I use 6 prong for straight lines, and 2 prong for curves.  I highly recommend them.  Leathercrafttools has two different types.  The ones I use are the diamond punches, not the "European punch."  On top of that, they're only like $10 for 6 prong and $6 for 2 prong, plus shipping.  Don't let the price fool you.  They produce beautiful stitches and are made of quality steel.  I've used one of the 6 prong ones for a couple years now, and it still produces clean effortless holes.  As others have said, you can also use these just to make indentations, and follow up with your awl if you want, which I sometimes do on very thick seams.

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On 1/10/2017 at 9:06 AM, Tugadude said:

Don't know if anyone recommended these yet...

 

image.png

Tugadude,

I used the CS Osborne chisel to mark the stitches for this:  

 

It makes for a very chunky stitch, but works great if you are using heavy thread like the 132 size linen rope I did the holster in.  All in all, they are very well made, very stout, and work well for heavy items (ie thick leather).  However, if you are using thin thread (332 and smaller) on small jobs with thin leather, probably not the best option, as they leave really big marks on the leather.  They aren't intended to punch through the leather, either.  They do not come in 2 prong versions.

They work great for their intended purpose.  Just my experience, YMMV.

 

YinTx

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On 1/6/2017 at 10:16 AM, billybopp said:

One big advantage of a pricking iron over an overstitch wheel is that the pricking iron helps guide the angle of your awl so that you get a nearly perfect angled hole every time - especially if your awl has a broader tip rather than extremely pointy. (Think a broadsword tip as opposed to a rapier tip in sword terms).  There is no guidance using an overstitch wheel, so your hand awl work has to be more precise and disciplined.  A stitching chisel can come close to a pricking iron in that awl guidance, if you don't use it to punch all the way through.. And if you go all the way through with them, they work great as long as they don't make huge gaping holes as some do.

Bill

The overstitch wheels are used after your done stitching, pricking wheels are different and give a small start in the leather for your awl. Big difference if you havent tried them. 

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I haven't tried pricking wheels, only overstitch wheels to mark spacing.  Mostly because I have only found pricking wheels in pretty high SPI.  Whether pricking wheel or overtitch they don't give you any guidance on angle - which is where I seem to need the most help.  What I'd really like to try is the VB type pricking wheel which leaves a pricking iron like mark, but they're pretty darn expensive.

Bill

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Angle is determined by how you hold the awl and stitching the same very time. I have marks or use a reference point on mine I will rest above my thumb. Some people will grind down one side of the awl haft so when you hold it you hold it the same way. Atleast thats how I do  it. 

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21 hours ago, billybopp said:

I haven't tried pricking wheels, only overstitch wheels to mark spacing.  Mostly because I have only found pricking wheels in pretty high SPI.  Whether pricking wheel or overtitch they don't give you any guidance on angle - which is where I seem to need the most help.  What I'd really like to try is the VB type pricking wheel which leaves a pricking iron like mark, but they're pretty darn expensive.

Bill

Actually pricking wheels do help with the angle.  They are angled tines and when you use them, they leave distinctly angled impressions in the leather.

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I borrowed this pic off of the web.  Tells the story pretty well.

 

 

image.jpeg

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Thanks Tugadude! That's what I was referring to as a VB style pricking wheel.  I've also seen other devices called pricking wheels that are more like a very pointy overstitch wheel - which wouldn't be of much use for me.  I'd love one day to try the VB pricking wheel that has an edge guide - that looks very useful, if pricey.

I find the angled marks of a pricking iron used with a broad-tipped awl to be best for me.  If you hold the awl just a bit loosely when entering the slit it will settle in and give the perfect angle every time - although you still need to be closeish with the angle and that's where a flat sided awl haft as Madmax mentioned helps.  It still requires attention to get the awl straight in the horizontal and vertical plane (pitch and yaw in flying terms) - but help with the "roll" angle from the angled slits is one less thing to worry about.  

Bill

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I bought these off of amazon. They come in a set of 4, less than $20.  I know they are cheap, but just starting out I didn't want to spend a bunch.  They have turned out to be well worth the little I spent on em.  They will need to be cleaned before use. They are pretty sharp.  The one thing I didn't want was for the prong to be tapered all the way up.  These have a point then do not tape anymore after that.   I like em enough that I went back and bought another size

 

--edit--  the pic did not paste. They are Aiskaer brand. Come in a plastic case. 

Edited by Brianm77

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3 hours ago, Brianm77 said:

I bought these off of amazon. They come in a set of 4, less than $20.  I know they are cheap, but just starting out I didn't want to spend a bunch.  They have turned out to be well worth the little I spent on em.  They will need to be cleaned before use. They are pretty sharp.  The one thing I didn't want was for the prong to be tapered all the way up.  These have a point then do not tape anymore after that.   I like em enough that I went back and bought another size

 

--edit--  the pic did not paste. They are Aiskaer brand. Come in a plastic case. 

I use the co link brand of those chisel and I'm really happy with them. Need to get around to getting another size of them.

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