WRLC

First Time Doing A Sheath With A Snap Handle Retainer

11 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

I've been making pouch sheaths but a guy asked me to make him a sheath for his Case Cutlery Buffalo Horn handle knife but wanted a snap closure handle retainer (no pouch). This is my first attempt at such a thing. Much harder than I thought it would be. Spent a long time on what looks like a very basic pattern.

I was pretty happy to remember to put the snap strap the right way so it would not catch on a branch when walking forward.

He wanted me just to cut some slits in the leather to put his belt through but I couldn't bring myself to do that. He liked my solution enough to order another.

Triple layer of 9oz leather with the welt. Hand stitched.

Case BH 01.jpg

Case BH 02.jpg

Case BH 03.jpg

Case BH 04.jpg

Case BH 05.jpg

Case BH 06.jpg

Edited by WRLC

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I like your design. It looks like it will ride low on the belt and out of the way while working.

Great job.

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Everything looks good except 1 thing, the location of the snap strap. Strap looks like it is already loose so once the sheath itself loosens up some, that knife could and probably will jump out enough that when he goes to reach for it, instead of grabbing handle, he's grabbing blade and now has an emergency on his hands. retention strap should be as close to the blade as possible to prevent the knife from jumping out and causing injury

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Nice looking knife sheath. Your hand stitching is superb.

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Your stitching is very nice and I like your belt loop fix (when I do one like this I put a belt thickness piece of leather at the top between the sheath and loop so that the belt will not distort the loop after repeated wear.)

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13 hours ago, Rohn said:

Nice looking knife sheath. Your hand stitching is superb.

Thank you very much Rohn. That is something I have been working to improve, especially as I learn to work with the very thick holser weight leathers.

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11 hours ago, Peter Darby said:

Your stitching is very nice and I like your belt loop fix (when I do one like this I put a belt thickness piece of leather at the top between the sheath and loop so that the belt will not distort the loop after repeated wear.)

Now that is why you post here, to learn something. The piece at the top is a very good tip. Making another one of these now and will add that piece. Thanks.

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Another way to design the belt loop is to extend the leather above the top of the knife to about the same length as the handle is. Then fold it over backwards to form the loop and stitch it at the end. This reduces the number of stitch seams and provides a belt loop that will not pinch the belt at the top making it easier to get on and off the belt.

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Your edges look very nice. To me, the skill of a true craftsman is shown in the edges. I read once that your projects are not finished until your edges are finished. Great job!!

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On 2017-01-21 at 0:29 PM, Axeman said:

Your edges look very nice. To me, the skill of a true craftsman is shown in the edges. I read once that your projects are not finished until your edges are finished. Great job!!

Thanks for that. I am learning that edge finishing can be an art. I just upgraded with some equipment from proedgeburnishers.com. Skirt chaser and a slot master.

This is the first edge from that gear plus a good buff with a piece of denim.

 

Edge Burnisher 01.jpg

Edge Burnisher 02.jpg

Nick's Puma 03.jpg

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Looks nice. That edge is beautiful.

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