Cstrubes

Problem with Tandy Gel Antique

10 posts in this topic

Hello everyone! I've only been leatherworking for about a year now and I'm completely hooked.  This is my first post here and I'm excited to hear your advice.

I'm having a problem with Tandy's Mahogany Gel Antique rubbing off after the project is finished.  I am using it to dye the whole project.  Basically I love the deep tones and the marbling effect I get from it. I got toothpaste on a toiletry bag I made and when I wiped it off, I noticed the cloth was red... even after it was finished with resolene. Here is my process:

1. Apply the antique with a sponge

2. Remove excess with paper towel

3. Let dry overnight

4. Apply Resolene

 

Perhaps I need to let it dry longer? I know not everyone is a fan of this Tandy product,   But I love how dark it gets when applied over stitch grooves, tooling or other imperfections.

I have tried fiebings mahogany Antique paste and felt that it was way too light and didn't have that black cherry color that I like.   I have also tried fiebings oxblood leather dye.  This was close but a little too red and it didn't darken in the impressions the way I like like. 

I'm making a messenger bag for a friend and I'm afraid that if she gets caught in a rain storm,  the dye will get all over her clothes.

I'll attach a couple projects I've made with the Tandy Gel Antique including the toiletry bag. 

 

 

IMG_4818.JPG

IMG_4819.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have much experience, but you might extend drying time. Then buff like crazy, and add more coats of resolene with plenty of drying times between coats.

I think that will do it.

Welcome and nice looking projects.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is a really cool bag, and I agree with you, an awesome color.  Would love to see photos of the inside if you have them.

I've had the same issues with rub off when the oil dyes get wet also, despite significant buffing, so I'm waiting patiently to see if other have been able to solve your problem.  The responses I have gotten in general just state they don't have the problem...

YinTx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would make sure that it is not cold but at least 75 deg.  I seal a lot of my dyed leather with Obenaufs heavy duty LP.  I seals and sets the dye for me.  I also preserves and treats the leather.  I will also not darken the leather as neats foot will.  It reacts with heat and absorbs more with heat.  If you use it, it cannot be cold.  Then buff with a clean cloth.

I don't use resolene but I use tan kote.  I would try buffing out the leather and apply another coat of resolene and see if that sets the dye better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Buff well after the dye has dried, before you put anything on top of it.  You need to remove the pigment that is on the surface.  Adding most any finish on top of the dye before it is buffed well usually results in spreading the surface pigments around instead of covering them.  Any solvent will dissolve the surface pigments.  Your finishes contain water or alcohol (or other solvents).

Tom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This topic is a recurring issue and there isn't a week goes by that someone isn't posting this very same issue.  When using the Gel Antique's you need to wipe off any excess with a damp cloth or sponge (not wet, damp) and then let it dry completely.  The damp sponge will remove anything that you don't want left on the leather based on the amount of pressure that you apply.  If you want to keep some of richness of the color then wipe it lightly; if you wan't to remove some of that richness and make the final color a bit brighter then you would wipe harder.  You have to do this immediately after you have wiped off the excess and before it gets time to set in.  As said, there are several threads contained within this very section of these forums that covers this type of issue with the Gel Antiques and you will find that the responses on how to go about using this product will get you in the right direction.  You will also find that there are several suggestions to quit using this type of product as it is loaded with issues that result from it.  These responses, for the most part, are from those of us with a vast wealth of experience in this trade and are based on fact and nothing else.

Good luck with your issue and let us all know how it comes out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

NV is right.  If you don't wipe off the excess right away while wet, you will have problems, even more problems.  Saddle tan turns dark red if you don't wipe and scrub it off!

Tom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you fellas.  I did wipe it with a damp rag after initially buffing it (forgot to mention that step). Perhaps I didn't do that enough.

For this particular project, I decided to go with Tandy Bordeaux water stain. It came out fairly similar and I'm generally happy with those products. 

I will try the suggestions in the future. 

Thanks again!

Craig 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So if I read this right, you used the Bordeaux water stain, then the Mahogany antique to get this color effect?  Not just Mahogany antique?

YinTx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/29/2017 at 9:50 PM, YinTx said:

So if I read this right, you used the Bordeaux water stain, then the Mahogany antique to get this color effect?  Not just Mahogany antique?

YinTx

So if o read this right Yin. We will be seeing a project of similar color down the road.lol I feel us it's an awesome color.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now