damsaddler13

How to hand stitch sheepskin to saddle skirting

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How do I stitch sheepskin to saddle skirting ?

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I would use a good spray adhesive and spray both the sheepskin and the saddle skirting.  Then, if hand stitching, rub your waxed thread back and forth on a brown paper bag to set the wax.  If you don't do this step your wool will stick on your thread and cause all sorts of problems.  Then just stitch away!  Al Stolhman explains it much better than I can.  Get his books.

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Hi i would use this stitch i don't know if you know this stitch but it looks harder than it really is 

it is good stitch to use for sewing leather to any kind of fabric. 

hope this helps jcuk

 

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Fleecing skirt for first time, or re-fleecing it? 

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Looking for a more efficient way to stitch the sheepskin to the skirting.

 

 

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Dam,

There are "efficient" ways, meaning ways that don't take as much time, and there are "good" ways, meaning ways that create a product you will be proud of.  If I'm fleecing a saddle for the first time, then I line the skirts up on my Adler and pull the threads out so that I am simply punching holes.  I run a stitch line as if I were actually sewing the fleece to the skirt. Then I cut out the fleece over-sized and apply rubber cement along about a foot of each side - fleece and skirt.  I tie a stitch on each end of this "tack" and several other places around the skirt so the pieces stay in place. Then I stitch in the holes I have pre-punched, using a diamond awl and two needles.  When I get to the end of the "tack", I create another one in the same fashion and sew it, etc, until the skirt is done.  Trim and edge, and you're done!  When you are finished, you will have a professional job.  I only apply rubber cement to about a 1 1/2 inch ribbon around each piece to allow for breathing and shrinkage of the dissimilar materials.  Do Not glue the whole surface!!!

When re-fleecing, your best looking job will be accomplished if you use the same stitch holes as the original saddle maker.  Otherwise you will perforate the leather and the job will not only look tacky, it will not hold up. 

Some jobs just don't lend themselves to short cuts.  This is one of them, if you ask me.

Cowboy Colonel

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