Recommended Posts

Hi there, the archive from this forum regarding the JUKI LU-562 is amazing and I've learned a ton, special thanks to UWE's and Alexander Dyer's videos on youtube. First time posting, I apologize if this is in the wrong section.

---

I'm setting up a JUKI LU-562 (subclass 3) for making things like bags and small accessories. I've so far...

1. Cleaned and installed the head

2. Removed the old clutch motor and installed a servo motor

3. Began to learn the details of thread, needle, and presser foot choice

4. Figured out thread tension/balance

5. Sewed some nice 1/4" coasters

I've still got questions such as...

1. How to minimize leather marking by the feed dog during sewing. Can I file the teeth smoother? Will that affect the unison feed especially if I use smooth presser feet as well? There are two thumb screws on the top of the machine, apparently one is for adjusting inside presser feet pressure and the other... outside presser feet pressure? I'm not sure what those do really, the parts diagram just calls them "adjustment thumb screws"....

2. How to slow the machine further. Even on the lowest setting on the servo motor with a 75mm diameter pulley, it is difficult to get the 1 second per stitch or slower pace that I want/need to do accurate turns. I plan on making a speed reducer using some pillow block bearings ($7 on ebay), 45mm and 120mm pulleys ($10 on ebay), and 15mm cold rolled steel rod (~$20 budgeted).

3. Continuing on slowing the machine down, there is a sweet spot on the pedal which, if I reach quickly, can do a smooth 1s/stitch. However if I try to approach this sweet spot slowly, the motor stalls/or just hums and further pressure results in a quick jolt. I wonder if I can place a limit or block so that when I bottom out the pedal, it reaches this sweet spot consistently. Any suggestions for such a limiting device is needed! I'm thinking either a chain hooked to the pedal, or something underneath to act as a stop.

4. Timing turns well. If the leather is turned at the wrong time during the stitching cycle, it can result in loose stitches on the bottom side. Timing the pick-up of the thread with turning is difficult without hand-cranking... tips welcome.

5. I know there are probably a lot of users here looking at machines especially after hand-stitching a couple belts. What do you want to know about the process? Maybe I can help.

Edited by reservedthought

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Building a speed reducer will help, also fit a 45mm pulley on the motor (every little bit helps!).

Another possibility (instead of a speed reducer) is to replace the handwheel with a large pulley, I've done that on a couple of my machines and it works well at slowing things down.

Edited by dikman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, dikman said:

Building a speed reducer will help, also fit a 45mm pulley on the motor (every little bit helps!).

Another possibility (instead of a speed reducer) is to replace the handwheel with a large pulley, I've done that on a couple of my machines and it works well at slowing things down.

Thanks, I did order one of the cheap 45mm pulleys off eBay to replace the stock one that came with the motor. How did you replace your handwheel? Did you turn one, print one, or buy one?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe your loose thread issue on corners or turning is caused by releasing tension by hand or

by knee lift.  This causes the first stitch or so to not tension up properly.  Pull on the

thread before the tension assembly, than stitch.  I always make sure the take-up lever is

at top or slightly descending before restarting.  If this works than adjust tension assembly so the

release is in the upper portion of the lift. Some machines don't have tension releases, my

Singer 144w305 for example.

Perhaps the experts could chim in, this issue has come up before and should be addressed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Speed reducer will help slow your machine. I recently went to a servo and added a speed reducer. My Juki will crawl if I have the servo on the slowest setting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In one case I used an existing pulley that I had in one of my spares boxes, the other one I happened to pick up a cheap old pulley at a junk yard. In both cases, though, I had to make sleeves to fit them on the shafts (Pfaff and Seiko machines). I forgot that I also fitted one to a Singer so that I could hand-crank it.

Might not necessarily look pretty but it slows things right down and they're good for hand-wheeling too.

 

111W117 10a.jpg

Pfaff pulley1a.jpg

Seiko 8a.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, ljk said:

I believe your loose thread issue on corners or turning is caused by releasing tension by hand or

by knee lift.  This causes the first stitch or so to not tension up properly.  Pull on the

thread before the tension assembly, than stitch.  I always make sure the take-up lever is

at top or slightly descending before restarting.  If this works than adjust tension assembly so the

release is in the upper portion of the lift. Some machines don't have tension releases, my

Singer 144w305 for example.

Perhaps the experts could chim in, this issue has come up before and should be addressed.

Thanks! That is certainly possible, I was tripping over myself watching the needle and take-up lever move while lifting the knee lift and guiding the material..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, dikman said:

In one case I used an existing pulley that I had in one of my spares boxes, the other one I happened to pick up a cheap old pulley at a junk yard. In both cases, though, I had to make sleeves to fit them on the shafts (Pfaff and Seiko machines). I forgot that I also fitted one to a Singer so that I could hand-crank it.

Might not necessarily look pretty but it slows things right down and they're good for hand-wheeling too.

 

111W117 10a.jpg

Pfaff pulley1a.jpg

Seiko 8a.jpg

Thanks so much for the photo reference! I guess I'll have to keep an eye out for these large pulleys. Would you happen to know if there is a standard bore diameter for your machines' handwheel/pulley? especially the JUKI, I'm not sure what mine is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now