LearningCurveLeatherwork

Accidentally Bought 2Lbs of Veg Tan Split Pieces...

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Any good and or unique ideas as to what I can do with it? They're decent sized pieces, probably 5x8" on average. Thought I was getting some good scrap for practice carving but I screwed that up for myself :crazy:

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Veggie splits will be fine for LINING a holster or - depending on the weight - perhaps even to MAKE holsters.  OR if you are using exotic leathers, then those should be fine for backing for the exotics.  Lots of the boys use them for accent panels / stiffeners on holsters, but could also be sewn to many other projects.  They don't have to be "scuffed" to take the glue, and the edges burnish like any other veg tanned.

 

Edited by JLSleather

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1 hour ago, JLSleather said:

Veggie splits will be fine for LINING a holster or - depending on the weight - perhaps even to MAKE holsters.  OR if you are using exotic leathers, then those should be fine for backing for the exotics.  Lots of the boys use them for accent panels / stiffeners on holsters, but could also be sewn to many other projects.  They don't have to be "scuffed" to take the glue, and the edges burnish like any other veg tanned.

 

Thanks! I was wondering about the edges, I'm glad you said that! I've been doing a bit of brainstorming and I think I may try to make a small coin purse/make up bag type deal and maybe use it to make the bullet holders on the stock guard I'm planning for my Henry.

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You could try pyrography (using a soldering iron) and practice that... There are some techniques out there for rough side carving as well if you're just looking for practice...

The coin purse is a good idea, a beer cozie or box for pencils etc, any 3d shape the catches your inspiration and it'll get you some stitch time and practice.  You may discover something you would've never thought of

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33 minutes ago, koreric75 said:

You could try pyrography (using a soldering iron) and practice that... There are some techniques out there for rough side carving as well if you're just looking for practice...

The coin purse is a good idea, a beer cozie or box for pencils etc, any 3d shape the catches your inspiration and it'll get you some stitch time and practice.  You may discover something you would've never thought of

I do have a nice wood burner I don't use often enough, I will have to give that a try! Beer cozie is also an excellent idea, and I could really get some use out of it hah! I appreciate the reply.

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Even though they are moderately small don't think they can only be used at that size. Sew them together edge to edge to make bigger pieces. Also I have a pattern for a hat/cap which requires 4 pieces 7 x 9inches each cut in an oval shape, or I use eight pieces about 4 x 9 or 8 inches in a half oval to make the hat.

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fredk, that sounds interesting. Care to share?

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Its 03:07 here; time for zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzs

I'll be back

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ok, I'm back.

The hat. I did not originate this. I got it from and adapted it from one in a 1976 book by Sylvia Grainger The book is called 'Leatherwork' - as simple as that. Its full of easy-peasy projects and I think it was the first book I bought over twenty years ago.

In the book the pattern is split into two to fit the pages. It also calls for using shearling.

Part A, is actually upside down but here so you can read the instructions

hat%2C%2001s-M.jpg

Part B

hat%2C%2002s-M.jpg

Together they make a piece approx 8 inches [at the base] x 10.5 inches. Lace four of these together and you get;

hat%2C%2003s-L.jpg

When I started leather craft I acquired a great load of upholstery leather off-cuts. A lot of it was narrow strips. I adapted the hat pattern to use a D shape

hat%2C%2004s-L.jpg

Each D is about 3.5 inches wide at the bottom and about 10 inches long. Using 8 of these D shapes I can make a nice round hat. The length can be greater or smaller than 10 inches as I do a double fold up rim, which uses up about 2 inches of the length. Also the 3.5 inches at the bottom can be increased to make the hat fit larger heads, but the size I have fits most heads. The 8 panels makes a better circular hat.

No.3 son wearing his;

Basic%20hat%2C%20%232-L.jpg

a snap of a customer wearing his, several years after he bought it; [No.3 took the photo from a distance]

Basic%20hat%2C%20%233-M.jpg

I think this must have been an early made one using four panels like the shearling one; [modelled by Charles]

Basic%20hat%2C%20%231-M.jpg

All the hats I've made are hand sewn. I've only recently bought a couple of sewing machines. All the upholstery leather is in tones of brown. I cut through the finish with lacquer thinners then dye it black or dark brown

These were quite a popular thing when I went to certain fairs.

A wee story; the wife as was then was doing the selling at our medieval craft stall at an event. No.1 & I were doing sword fighting and archery displays. I'd made up about 15 of these hats to sell plus me and the boys each had one to wear under our chainmaille coifs [hoods]. Anyway, me, No.1 and No.2 stopped for a break. We put our gear on the lunch table. When we went to re-start our hats were missing, so were our wooden practice swords. Wifey had sold them! She'd run out of the hats and sold our four [No.3's hat was sold too] and she'd got a good offer for the wood swords so sold them. Her response was, 'you can make more later, but those customers are here now'

Sorry if this is too much. If its not required just delete it

 

 

 

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LOL good story and thanks for sharing !

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Love the hats! 

Did you line them with wool?

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No lining at all,  just the raw leather inside

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The hats are great, and I could see how they would fly off the shelves at a medieval festival. They could even make a decent welders hat.

 

I'm also thinking about trying to make a really simple motorcycle shifter boot protector, I think that would be a fun little project.

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Actually my best year was 2004; Will Smith wore a similar looking hat in 'I, Robot'. People wanted the 'Will Smith Hat'. I must have done about 50 of them that year. >> I am not a mass producer!

I recommend you get some of the Leatherwork books of the 1970s and earlier. They have loads of small projects which can either be copied or adapted. I have a book from the 1950s or late 1940s; in it are precise instructions for making gloves. That book cost me about $2. With the gloves and other projects in it its worth far more to me

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Oh man, I know exactly what you're talking about! That's the same year that Converse came back in style like crazy because of that same movie! So interesting the way little things like that have such a grand effect. 

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