immiketoo

The merits of quick casing. Or how to start a fight with Leather workers :)

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I like quick casing.  And spraying moisture. Here’s why.

 

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Thanks for the video Mike. I too use the method you use to case. Glad to see I am not the only one. 

I am curious about what tool you use for the hand beveling?

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@immiketoo Excellent video. I don’t do any tooling of leather yet but it’s a joy to watch your video. Thanks.

i did buy some leather tools from a retired leather worker and among the tools were some swivel knifes and a lot of blades, some with the plastic protection still on the tips. When I’m home later I’d like to post a picture of them and maybe you could tell me what I have?

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41 minutes ago, Bodean said:

Thanks for the video Mike. I too use the method you use to case. Glad to see I am not the only one. 

I am curious about what tool you use for the hand beveling?

I use a Bob Beard B2 in this video.

Just now, KingsCountyLeather said:

@immiketoo Excellent video. I don’t do any tooling of leather yet but it’s a joy to watch your video. Thanks.

i did buy some leather tools from a retired leather worker and among the tools were some swivel knifes and a lot of blades, some with the plastic protection still on the tips. When I’m home later I’d like to post a picture of them and maybe you could tell me what I have?

Message me or tag me and I’m glad to help see wha you have.

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I "cased" some leather when I first started -- probably just because that's what the old Tandy books said to do.  Wasn't long to figure out that isn't necessary - possibly due to changes in tanning processes (?) over 50 years, idunno.  

I sponge.  Most of the moisture added to the back.  When it comes through the front, you ready ;)

Didn't get to finish your carving in one sitting?@!  No worries - decide which part of the design you can FINISH, and finish it - then cover the rest with a piece of tracing film that's laying around anyway, and it will still be fine to tool later, or tomorrow (just don't leave it wet for days).

 

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Mike, I'm curious to know where that pattern you used came from! I've never seen one like that before - I've only seen Tandy Craftaid patterns.

Great video! I learned a lot from watching you work!

 

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3 minutes ago, Sheilajeanne said:

Mike, I'm curious to know where that pattern you used came from! I've never seen one like that before - I've only seen Tandy Craftaid patterns.

Great video! I learned a lot from watching you work!

 

This is a pattern that was made by Ed LaBarre for one of his classes.  The "craftaid" was made by Grey Ghost Graphics.  He makes them for several of the instructors who teach the same class many times.  Saves a TON of time in the classroom for tracing.

I'm glad the vid helped, in whatever fashion it did :P

 

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It sure did, Mike!

So, uh, is Bob still making tools? I really like that beveller! What does the surface of it look like?

Quote

I use a Bob Beard B2 in this video.

 

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He certainly is!

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The old man never soaked his leather or put it in the fridge or buried a dead cat and walked counterclockwise circles around it. He spritzed it with water evenly every time he went to work on a piece. That's it. Simple. (He did prefer distilled water, but if he was carving most of it he didn't care). I was astounded when I first learned there were 47 ways to case leather and no one will ever agree. Bob Beard is still making tools, but get your order in soon. He's usually working at least a year out.

~J

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40 minutes ago, immiketoo said:

He certainly is!

I sure hope so.  I placed an order and gave him my money for a flower center tool at the show last year that wasn't in his booth, and haven't heard hide nor hair from him since.  He also didn't give me a receipt, which has me concerned.  The tools I got at the show were plenty nice, and I enjoy using them.

YinTx

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Johanna, that's why I asked what the face of that beveler looked like. Not sure I want to wait a year, if I can find a similar one from another tool maker... :P

Bob doesn't even have a catalogue on his website so I couldn't check it out there. :(

Edited by Sheilajeanne

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Also, regarding casing.  I have done both in my short time tooling.  On occasion, I will discover that the leather absorbs the moisture unevenly, and thus will tool unevenly if I don't let it sit for an hour or so.  If I am doing something small and simple, quick casing is great.  If I am doing something I feel is more complex and I don't want any difficulties beveling etc, I'll bag it for a few hours and let it set out for a bit.  I guess what I am saying is both methods work for me, and I adapt/use which ever one I feel I have time for or I think the leather might need for a particular project.  Nice to see I am not wrong in doing so, considering all the banter for/against each method!  Thanks for sharing, Mike!

YinTx

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23 minutes ago, YinTx said:

I sure hope so.  I placed an order and gave him my money for a flower center tool at the show last year that wasn't in his booth, and haven't heard hide nor hair from him since.  He also didn't give me a receipt, which has me concerned.  The tools I got at the show were plenty nice, and I enjoy using them.

YinTx

Bob wont forget.  He took your information and he will surprise you one day, out of the blue.  That's the way it works.

29 minutes ago, Johanna said:

The old man never soaked his leather or put it in the fridge or buried a dead cat and walked counterclockwise circles around it. He spritzed it with water evenly every time he went to work on a piece. That's it. Simple. (He did prefer distilled water, but if he was carving most of it he didn't care). I was astounded when I first learned there were 47 ways to case leather and no one will ever agree. Bob Beard is still making tools, but get your order in soon. He's usually working at least a year out.

~J

Amen.  The sheer audacity of some of what's out there boggles the mind.

23 minutes ago, Sheilajeanne said:

Johanna, that's why I asked what the face of that beveler looked like. Not sure I want to wait a year, if I can find a similar one from another tool maker... :P

Bob doesn't even have a catalogue on his website so I couldn't check it out there. :(

You wont find a similar tool out there unless you make it yourself.

15 minutes ago, YinTx said:

Also, regarding casing.  I have done both in my short time tooling.  On occasion, I will discover that the leather absorbs the moisture unevenly, and thus will tool unevenly if I don't let it sit for an hour or so.  If I am doing something small and simple, quick casing is great.  If I am doing something I feel is more complex and I don't want any difficulties beveling etc, I'll bag it for a few hours and let it set out for a bit.  I guess what I am saying is both methods work for me, and I adapt/use which ever one I feel I have time for or I think the leather might need for a particular project.  Nice to see I am not wrong in doing so, considering all the banter for/against each method!  Thanks for sharing, Mike!

YinTx

Its always whatever works for you!

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I used to use a sprayer with a drop of dishwashing detergent in distilled water for carving. It's been a while as these days I only case for stamping and embossing of production work. A problem this time of year is the 5% humidity in the workshop. I use a piece of cellulose sponge and then keep everything covered with plastic till ready to go. Wet forming usually  takes a couple of hours in the mid day sun. 

Thanks for a very interesting and well produced video.

Bob

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Hey Bob, when I lived in Chicago, we had that same thing in winter.  It would dry out so quickly!  Now, I have lots of humidity so I get great time with just spritzing!

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Are you in Greece working with the refugees, retired or working?

I used to spend time in Greece when I was a kid. Loved it! Definitely in my immediate future.

If you want to PM me...

Bob 

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10 minutes ago, BDAZ said:

Are you in Greece working with the refugees, retired or working?

I used to spend time in Greece when I was a kid. Loved it! Definitely in my immediate future.

If you want to PM me...

Bob 

Bob,  I retired from the police force in 2015, and I moved here to be with the woman I love!  Great move, and I haven't regretted it a single day.  If you ever get to Rhodes, let me know.  I'll buy you a beer.  Or a coffee.  

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@immiketoo  Mike, thank you for the very informative video.

I even find it difficult to decide what you are better at - working with the leather or in the ability to convey your experience to others.

Edited by ABHandmade

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You're welcome.  I am glad you enjoyed it.

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2 hours ago, immiketoo said:

Bob,  I retired from the police force in 2015, and I moved here to be with the woman I love!  Great move, and I haven't regretted it a single day.  If you ever get to Rhodes, let me know.  I'll buy you a beer.  Or a coffee.  

Great move.I assume you don't miss Chicago winters!! I may take you up on that beer!  BTW I used to play traditional Irish music at the Abbey Tavern, Chief O'Neill's, Irish Fest  in Milwaukee and many other places in Chicagoland. The band wanted me to move and  I told them I wouldn't be able to handle the winters.

Again, thanks for the great videos.

Bob

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I don’t not miss much about Chicago.  Maybe beef sandwiches and my internet speed.  I’ve been to the Irish fest in Milwaukee some years ago and had a blast.  Great town, wouldn’t want to live there :)

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5 hours ago, immiketoo said:

I don’t not miss much about Chicago.  Maybe beef sandwiches and my internet speed.  I’ve been to the Irish fest in Milwaukee some years ago and had a blast.  Great town, wouldn’t want to live there :)

Mike, I left Chicago in 1981 and just arrived back here yesterday to attend a wedding.  It was 85 degrees when I left Atlanta and it’s 50 degrees now here in Chicago.  I would never want to move back here, but I sure do miss the  Italian beef sandwiches and pizza!

Gary

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Sorry Gary, no pizza exists West of the Hudson and SOuth of Brooklyn or North of the Bronx. It's just the way it is. 

 

Bob

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46 minutes ago, BDAZ said:

Sorry Gary, no pizza exists West of the Hudson and SOuth of Brooklyn or North of the Bronx. It's just the way it is. 

 

Bob

So the real fight in this thread is gonna be over pizza?  Thin or thick?  New York or Chicago?  Lets get ready to rumble!!!

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