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When I've sew two pieces together, and  after going through beveling, sanding, burnishing, dyeing (and some re-burnishing) I am getting nice slick edges. However, my one concern is that it seems like no matter what I do, you can see a faint line down the center of my dyed edges where two pieces are sewn together. Is there anyone way to better eliminate this line and more fully make it look like a single, uniform edge? 

IMG_3131.JPG

Edited by superpacker

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Are the two pieces glued? Contact cement helps keep the edges together.

 

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They are glued. But to avoid it spilling over onto the edge when clamped I try not to take it to the end of the edge

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Take it all the way to the edge.  Leaving it shy of the edge wont let the leather edges stick together and will show the line.

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You wont entirely eliminate the "line". But DO glue to the edge. In fact, I generally glue the back of the belt, then cut the liner about 1/4" wider so I don't have to "fiddle" with lining it up. Stick'er down, tap the edges, trim.  If you got any "glue boogers", a piece of canvas will take it off easily.. no water, just rub the edge with canvas (I'm told denim will work also).  To avoid "bits" I didn't see, I just rub the entire edge - take bout a minute.  You can POLISH that edge to no end, and you will STILL have a thin "line" (but no space between layers).

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23 hours ago, JLSleather said:

You wont entirely eliminate the "line". But DO glue to the edge. In fact, I generally glue the back of the belt, then cut the liner about 1/4" wider so I don't have to "fiddle" with lining it up. Stick'er down, tap the edges, trim.  If you got any "glue boogers", a piece of canvas will take it off easily.. no water, just rub the edge with canvas (I'm told denim will work also).  To avoid "bits" I didn't see, I just rub the entire edge - take bout a minute.  You can POLISH that edge to no end, and you will STILL have a thin "line" (but no space between layers).

 I HATE the line.  I have spent a lot of time learning to eliminate the line.  With enough sanding, slicking and wax you CAN eliminate the line.  Most people won't take the time to do the work required to eliminate it, but I refuse to let them live in my work.

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On 5/16/2018 at 10:49 AM, immiketoo said:

 I HATE the line.  I have spent a lot of time learning to eliminate the line.  With enough sanding, slicking and wax you CAN eliminate the line.  Most people won't take the time to do the work required to eliminate it, but I refuse to let them live in my work.

This works for me too. You just have to put in the time both in prep work before edging and then when finishing the edges. By putting in the little bit of extra time you can make 4 layers of leather have no visible line. 

Edited by Bolt Vanderhuge

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Here is is a quick video of a method i have used on my work not sure if it would work for but you can give try on some scrap leather.

I also work mainly on horse tack, a lot heavier weight leather than the leather in your photo - correct me if i am wrong a watch strap thats why

As I say, not sure if it would work for you.

JCUK

Hope this helps JCUK 

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1 hour ago, Bolt Vanderhuge said:

This works for me too. You just have to put in the time both in prep work before edging and then when finishing the edges. By putting in the little bit of extra time you can make 4 layers of leather have no visible line. 

One thing about this.  Using your contact cement properly is crucial.  Thin glue is better than thick gobs of it, and its imperative that you hammer all your edges with a cobblers hammer.  This compresses the fibers and helps make the composite as close to one piece of leather.  The hammering step changed my world when it came to eliminating the line, but to see it now you'd need a good magnifying glass and very bright light at precisely the right angle, and even then, most people miss it.  

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No dye.  No edge poop.  No liquid plastic.  Just leather 'n' glue ... ''n' no line.  Nope.

I mean eliminate it, not camouflage it.

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As @JLSleather said, oversize the piece by 1/4-1/2 inch and trim the excess to size.  It’s a perfect edge every time. 

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On 5/17/2018 at 11:15 PM, JLSleather said:

No dye.  No edge poop.  No liquid plastic.  Just leather 'n' glue ... ''n' no line.  Nope.

I mean eliminate it, not camouflage it.

There ya go changing the rules mid stream.  At this point at a game of semantics.  Of course its more difficult on all natural edges, but I know a guy who can do it.  As soon as I find a pic, I'll post it.  He's about as good as they come.  But the OP's post showed black leather so why handicap yourself by limiting the use of materials to conceal it?  If the eye can't see it, who cares if its actually there?

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On 5/18/2018 at 2:44 AM, immiketoo said:

One thing about this.  Using your contact cement properly is crucial.  Thin glue is better than thick gobs of it, and its imperative that you hammer all your edges with a cobblers hammer.  This compresses the fibers and helps make the composite as close to one piece of leather.  The hammering step changed my world when it came to eliminating the line, but to see it now you'd need a good magnifying glass and very bright light at precisely the right angle, and even then, most people miss it.  

I've only ever seen cobblers hammers in photos so perhaps I'm missing something. For the purpose of hammering down leather that's being glued together, is it any better than, say, the flat head of a ball peen hammer?

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The face on a cobbler's hammer is a bit domed and larger than a ball peen.  The one I have is about an inch and  5/8 across.  This allows you to hit the leather and not have the edge of the face dig in and leave a mark.  You can get cobber hammer heads off of eBay for any where from $5 w/shipping to the seller is emotionally attached to it and won't part with it for less the $200.  You can buy a French style hammer new for about $50.  The other, less sexy style, about $30.  But if you  have a ball peen hammer head that is large enough and a belt sander, you can put a slight dome on it yourself.

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12 hours ago, niakulah said:

I've only ever seen cobblers hammers in photos so perhaps I'm missing something. For the purpose of hammering down leather that's being glued together, is it any better than, say, the flat head of a ball peen hammer?

I have used a cobblers hammer for many years and for the more delicate leathers that are easy to bruise I have glued onto the face of the hammer a piece of firm veg to further protect the job. I have got away so far using one glued on piece for about 5 years now and that is just attached with contact glue. The face of the hammer is about 38mm or 1+1/2"

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Another thought if you don't like seeing a line as JLS said

On 18/05/2018 at 6:15 AM, JLSleather said:

No dye.  No edge poop.  No liquid plastic.  Just leather 'n' glue ... ''n' no line.  Nope.

I mean eliminate it, not camouflage it.

 Just fold the edges instead I guess. That'll give you an exact colour match as well. I used to do all my watch bands that way once. The pictures below shows some ostrich ones I made once. The ones with the watch faces done had to be split down to .3mm and I did have a fairly high fail rate on that.

IMGP6838_resize.JPG

IMGP6836_resize.JPG

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10 hours ago, Aven said:

The face on a cobbler's hammer is a bit domed and larger than a ball peen.  The one I have is about an inch and  5/8 across.  This allows you to hit the leather and not have the edge of the face dig in and leave a mark.  You can get cobber hammer heads off of eBay for any where from $5 w/shipping to the seller is emotionally attached to it and won't part with it for less the $200.  You can buy a French style hammer new for about $50.  The other, less sexy style, about $30.  But if you  have a ball peen hammer head that is large enough and a belt sander, you can put a slight dome on it yourself.

Ah ok. I've already domed my ball peen hammer's face. It is only 30mm across though. I feel insufficient. lol

 

5 hours ago, RockyAussie said:

I have used a cobblers hammer for many years and for the more delicate leathers that are easy to bruise I have glued onto the face of the hammer a piece of firm veg to further protect the job. I have got away so far using one glued on piece for about 5 years now and that is just attached with contact glue. The face of the hammer is about 38mm or 1+1/2"

Good tip. Thanks.

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2 hours ago, niakulah said:

Ah ok. I've already domed my ball peen hammer's face. It is only 30mm across though. I feel insufficient. lol

 

Good tip. Thanks.

Get a good cobblers hammer then put a mirror finish on it.  You will be pleased with the results of your firmly glued edges.  Its also handy for wet molding pouches and sheathes etc.

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8 minutes ago, immiketoo said:

Get a good cobblers hammer then put a mirror finish on it.  You will be pleased with the results of your firmly glued edges.  Its also handy for wet molding pouches and sheathes etc.

Now will that me look like I'm loosing or gaining weight??:blink:

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Convex, so gaining I'd guess!  LOL!  A concave hammer wouldn't be very good, now that I think about it.

 

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