sulla

Help understanding this applied edge trim for turn shoes, please.

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I make turn shoes for mostly reenacting purposes.  I have decided to up my game by doing some edge trim on a two-toggle Scandinavian turn shoe. 

The trim is skived to about half or 1/3 thickness on one side.  The thicker side of the trim is first butt-seamed to the edge of the upper leather.  Then it is turned over so the thinner skived side is inside the shoe and is then stitched to the inside of the leather upper with a sort of hidden whip stitch.  These whip stitches do not show through the leather. 

I understand how to do the butt stitch, but I was wondering if there were any tricks or techniques or even special tools for this.  I have some shallow curve bladed awls but have not used them for this purpose.

 

(first image is a process photo by Simurlan.  The images of completed shoes are made by Alexey Nikifovorov. )

 

trim stitching hidden seam 1.jpg

Dorestadt tuggle boots. Viking age. 9th-10th century. After O. Goubitz 1.jpg

Dorestadt tuggle boots. Viking age. 9th-10th century. After O. Goubitz 2.jpg

Edited by sulla

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Thanks!   I've used that stitch too many times to count when sewing cloth but never with leather.  I hadn't thought about that with a glovers' needle.  :)

Here is an image of the construction from a book I have.  I wonder if in step 'c' the holes in the upper are pre-punched with a strait or curved awl, sewn through with a strait or curved needle, or something else?  The books offer no further suggestions as to method of construction for this type of seam.

piped edge binding.jpg

Edited by sulla

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That is similar to what is typically called a rolled edge.  Personally I think your leather is thin enough and soft enough to not need an awl, curved or not.  

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