chrisash

Chrome working

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Have looked through many posts but not really had any success in my quest

I don't wont to use paints etc on the edges, so need to bring that option up

Using very fine about 1mm chrome leather similar to furniture leather, looking to treat the edges without using paints, have tried Gum Trag with limited success and the same with bees wax but is there a better way like heat tools etc

Tried creasing with double pronged creaser, and heat, works well with veg tan but hardly a mark with Chrome is it a case of more heat?

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Have you thought about skiving and folding the edge instead?

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i think folded edges or binding are your best shot if you don't want to do edge dressing...chrome and even some veg don't burnish, they tend to be a more supple feel but the edges are usually finished in a way that you don't see them.  What are you making would be helpful info...there are many stitches and techniques for this leather type but really depends on the application.  Here's a leatherworker.net search for finishing chrome tan

site:leatherworker.net how to finish chrome tan edges

Edited by koreric75
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Thanks Koreric

Yes seen those posts

Basically looking at making a Tote bag with outside seams like say a messenger bag rather than internal seams, I have already designed it with rolled edges, but never having worked before with Chrome was just looking to see if there was any alternative to make edges more natural

I did try burnishing with either water, Gum Trag or Bees wax and all combinations; and can get a half hearted finish using a dremel and holding the leather between two thin plywood panels to hold the edge more firm whilst doing it, just leaving about 5 mm gap of leather edge

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2 hours ago, chrisash said:

Thanks Koreric

Yes seen those posts

Basically looking at making a Tote bag with outside seams like say a messenger bag rather than internal seams, I have already designed it with rolled edges, but never having worked before with Chrome was just looking to see if there was any alternative to make edges more natural

I did try burnishing with either water, Gum Trag or Bees wax and all combinations; and can get a half hearted finish using a dremel and holding the leather between two thin plywood panels to hold the edge more firm whilst doing it, just leaving about 5 mm gap of leather edge

Your welcome, i have used similar methods...but found that the edge even if you get it looking good doesn't hold.  The burnish easily get fuzzy and eventually you can't tell it was done.  The soft floppy nature of the the bag leather lets it move too much to stay.  Heated iron with attachment held the longest, but still didn't hold up to use/manipulation.  For my totes I stitch them inside out and flip them so the seam is inside, if you're looking for an outside seam that shows off some hand stitching, you could try a french or flat seam, it's going to double (maybe triple if you had stitch the first seam) your stitches though.  I haven't tried this yet but have been considering it.  I think it would look interesting if the inside flaps are consistently punched/spaced. The pic below was machine stitched, but still looks good, it was functional more than for looks as this particular piece of leather was not wide enough for the application but had plenty of length to double so I cut it in half and stitched together using this youtube video for flat seams as a guide.  I didn't have staples for my stapler so i used some binder clips and it worked out ok.  Another thing you could try rather than rolling the edge would be adding piping around the seam of the tote, that would look nice as well.  I haven't tried this one either, but in my mind i would stitch inside out (grain sides together) then glue or pin the piping to the front panel part of the seam, flip inside out and then stitch right along the piping on the outside...I may be incorrect on that process and would need to do it to make sure...lol.  post up some pics of whatever you decide/come up with...

https://i.imgur.com/iQGAsjym.jpg?2

iQGAsjym.jpg?2

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Many thanks, gives me something to think about

To me the inside seems just dont look very nice but a lot less sewing, still woke up this morning, which is always a good start at 71 so guess its rolled edges for me

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8 hours ago, chrisash said:

Many thanks, gives me something to think about

To me the inside seems just dont look very nice but a lot less sewing, still woke up this morning, which is always a good start at 71 so guess its rolled edges for me

true, lots less sewing, less complicated and easier to hide mistakes...lol...  I just finished up this bag stitching so may get some scrap and play a little.  are you hand stitching or have a machine?  Flatbed or cylinder? Congrats and wish you many more! 

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Hand stitching and still a learner," that's my excuse for wiggly stitching lines"

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2 hours ago, chrisash said:

Hand stitching and still a learner," that's my excuse for wiggly stitching lines"

so depending on what look you want, have you considered lacing?  The mexican braid can be learned pretty easily and would look really nice on a raw outside seam...just have to punch the holes, but if you're hand stitching you're already doing that.   Here's a starter video, it's how I learned and have used it on quite a few projects...all veg tan projects, but i hadn't thought about using it on a bag until recently...I'd downsize the lace and holes but it would look awesome and you can match or coord colors with the bag color...

QdbS25V.jpg

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I bet that took a lot of time to tighten it up after you finished lacing it.But you are right it does look great, 

I think membership of Leatherworker.net and watching Nigel Armitage video's plus you tube one is equivalent to the best part of a degree in leather making, and just like a university degree's, its gives you the knowledge but the skills to use it takes another good few years

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10 hours ago, chrisash said:

I bet that took a lot of time to tighten it up after you finished lacing it.But you are right it does look great, 

I didn't need to retighten, just kept it snug as I went...the lacing gets tightened down by the one after it and if you dampen the lace a little with a wet rag as you go it sticks right where you put it...

 

10 hours ago, chrisash said:

I think membership of Leatherworker.net and watching Nigel Armitage video's plus you tube one is equivalent to the best part of a degree in leather making, and just like a university degree's, its gives you the knowledge but the skills to use it takes another good few years

that is true, the instruction and theory are very helpful, but with out practical application and practice it doesn't go far...I think that is why we don't have as many younger generation leatherworkers...it takes diligence and practice and isn't as easy as swiping or clicking a button on a controller.  Both of my kids, (15 & 5) have taken an interest, but get discouraged easily...just have to nudge them along and not force the issue if they're getting burned out...

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