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Recently received this N.Porter saddle to clean and repair.  The leather was in good condition, and the saddle was a pleasure to repair.  Can anyone identify the possible age of the saddle?  There are some construction designs that are similar to those found in Stohlman's  Encyclopedia of Saddle Making.  The saddle tooling was also unique.

Ron

 

n.porter5 (2).JPG

n.porter fender - Copy.JPG

n.porter rear jockey - Copy.JPG

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Shot,

 

Porter made in Phoenix and there is still a shop in that area.  All of the Porters that I have refurbished had a card on the near bar aft of the cantle with the necessary information.  I did one that was made in 1906, I believe, and another that was made in the late 1920s.  They're easy to work on and nice to have around.  I have two of my own (old ones). Central Coast here.

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I didn't find any card.  There was a serial number behind the cantle on the near side.  The seat is only 12 inches, yet the stirrup fenders are 19 inches long; so it isn't a kids saddle. 

The fleece was in good condition for the saddle's possible age.  I only repaired and replaced what was critical for safety and to keep the customer's cost down.  It's a nice and strong saddle, too bad the seat is so small.  Also, does anyone know what the purpose of the left hand strap on the fork was for?

Ron

 

n.porter finished - Copy.JPG

n.porter side - Copy.JPG

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I rode a Hizer saddle when I was a youngster, built back in the mid 1930's that had the strings on the left side of the fork.  I have seen some built back in the 40's and 50's that had them factory.  I never was sure what they were for but I used to tie a bull whip on the left and a rope on the right.  I have seen them extra strings on Hizers,  Hamley's  several custom saddles and now a Porter.  

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