AaronDouglasWales

Mayer & Flamery machine a parer for sale

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Hello fellow leather craftsmen I am offering this beautiful Mayer and Flamery Machine a Parer for sale. These machines were made in Paris around the turn of the century and their reputation exceeds that of the famous J. Dixon or Osbourne splitters and are rare today even in France! The splitter is in perfect condition with a professionally hollow ground blade, honed and ready for another 100 years of service.

This has been my backup machine, but honestly I only hone my own blade twice a year so there is no need for two machine when one of you folks could put it to good use!

I am asking 2000 AUD for the machine or the nearest offer.

Kind Regards,

Aaron.

mayer 1.jpg

mayer 2.jpg

mayer 3.jpg

mayer 4.jpg

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Please post your location so we know where you are shipping from.

Gary

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5 hours ago, AaronDouglasWales said:

 2574 NSW, Australia.

Please update your profile with your location.  It really helps to know if you are next door, or the other side of the world.  It helps get info that is meaningful to you as well.

Tom

Edit:  I see your IP address places you in France, so your reply above was more meaningful than your location.

Edited by Northmount
added comment

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I don't need this, but thanks for posting it. It looks very robust and yet, elegant at the same time. I'd not heard of these before. Thanks.

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G'day Bikermutt,

When one looks through the history of leatherwork tools the French (along with the Germans) seem consider the beauty of the tool itself not only the function and longevity. While the old American and English tools seem to be less elegant but perfectly functional and robust! (This is my opinion only, wouldn't want any cultural arm wrestles on the forum)

Regards,

ADW.

 

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I think we the UK did excel though in engineering beauty, in the late Victorian period, some of our old pump houses are equal to cathedrals in beauty over basic design, But unfortunately modern design is function only

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Your correct Chris, no hard feelings!

The only piece of English engineering I use as a leather craftsman is my Pearson no 6. Which is something like a late Victorian pump house and in my opinion the best sewing machine ever made!

ADW.

 

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On 8/27/2018 at 5:06 AM, AaronDouglasWales said:

G'day Bikermutt,

When one looks through the history of leatherwork tools the French (along with the Germans) seem consider the beauty of the tool itself not only the function and longevity. While the old American and English tools seem to be less elegant but perfectly functional and robust! (This is my opinion only, wouldn't want any cultural arm wrestles on the forum)

Regards,

ADW.

 

I don’t consider that an untrue statement. But, I think it may have more to do with the ages of countries more than culture. Germany, France, and Great Britain were around for such a long period before the industrial revolution.

You had generations of masters before the IR. Where as America was just coming into it’s own at the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. With America snatching the reins of the IR function over form just became the norm.

Really something to think about...

 

good luck with the sale.

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Hello again bikermutt

This particular tool was made by Mayer & Flamery a former foreman at Blanchard (before the factory moved to Romilly) who in 1900 stole all the model blueprints and the list of customers before his persecution before the courts. However Mayer & Flamery continued to sucessfully manufacture his machine a parer until 1960.

It should be known that his machine a parer was actually an adaptation of the American Osbourne 83 leather splitter with only few modifications to the lever and blade guard (The later osbourne 84 is still manufactured today)

The Blanchard factory was established in 1823 which is during the final years of the Industrial Revolution. In fact all of their tools were hand made entirely by hand and each component was numbered specifically for that tool. It wasn't until after the war 1914-1918 they started to incorporate forged brass components in their plough gauges, pricking wheels and washer cutters. This according to many eminent European saddlers Mark's the end of Blanchards reputation.

So I agree completely with your statement about the IR influencing the manufacturing of leatherwork tools, however it didn't really come to play until something like 75 years after the revolution had finished.

While American was just coming into it's own at the beggining of the Industrial Revolution, it wasn't until the end of the IR my country came into hers. Can't find a single old leatherwork tool made by an Australian company.

Kind Regards,

ADW.

 


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Edited by AaronDouglasWales
number error

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