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I have a Singer 145W 302 Double Needle Long Arm Machine and I need to chanhe the gauge set to 3/8 to accommodate the work that I do now automotive upholstery. Is changimg tje gauge set complicated or is it something that a mechanically omclined person can handle on its own. Well most importantly I need a gauge set, needle bar plate and other pieces to change ot does anybody habe one or know of someone that has a 3/8 gauge set for this machine.

Thanks,

Ralph

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It will involve a few parts.  Changing them if you have never done it can be a little tricky.  The manual will help a little.  I see no middle balance wheel on that machine??  Try eBay for parts.  I would call dealers in California first for parts after checking eBay since they are local.  After that, call Bob Kovar at Toledo Sewing.  You might try College Sewing in England as well.  Even with generic parts, will not be cheap!

glenn

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The presser feet, feed dog, throat plate and needle clamp need to be replaced. The shuttles will need to be moved to match the new needle positions. Then the timing will need to be set on the hooks. That may not be everything. An industrial sewing machine dealer can assist you with getting all the necessary parts in a complete kit.

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When I look at the gauge sets at College Sewing you could end up with $500 - $600 for a gauge set incl shipping and tax So depending on your needs, your project and the local market it would probably be cheaper when you buy a lets say used Singer 212 or similar with 3/8 gauge set. Gauge Sets for Singer 212 are dirt cheap - like $25 for a complete set. So maybe that's even an investment for the future.

Just an idea w/o knowing what in particular you want to sew with the machine ;)

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I bought this machine with intentions of sewing door panels. The gentlemen that took me in as an apprentice used to do his door panels with a long arm just like this one but his was a single needle. I remember he would say if only his machine was a double needle things would be easier. He would sew the vinyl and a layer of thin foam right through the cardboard and the look was amazing as well as the sun visors. The outcome would look factory, especially on older impalas like 1958-1964 that is all we worked on as far back as I can remember. Everybody would come to him that owned an Impala no other upholstery shop was able to accomplish his look and style. I came across this machine working order according to seller and at a resonable price. I did look for other options as well as new machines the long arm double needle in a Consew brand is about 6000 plus dollars Atlas levy has his brand for about 3000 and a little over. So I think I did good buying this machine. I did find a retailer that has a complete gauge set for this machine for 150 dollars here in California probably generic as well as another dealer that quoted me 800 dollars for a gauge set most likely Singer brand. The first dealer also let me know that the balance wheel on the front of the machine to turn it by hand is very expensive around 700 dollars. This handwheel was optional at that time. If I install a good servo motor and a speed reducer it will probably slow down the machine to where I dont need the balance wheel. The machine was just disassembled for transportation purposes it was mounted to its original table with most likely its original Singer cluth motor. I just hope this works out for me and that I am able to accomplish the style I am after. Overall I think I did good on this machine its a double needle and that itself will put me in a whole different level. No matter how good someone is you can always distinguish when a French seam was done in a single needle machine. Back to my original question does anybody know exactly what will be needed to change the gauge set, how many pieces are needed that way I know if the gauge set for 150 dollars would work and is complete.

Thank you all for your help.

Ralph

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Ralph,just wanted to let you know I don't have one in stock ,you will need both feet,a feed dog,needle plate & needlebar.to change it.

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150 for a complete gauge set is a bargain even for generic parts. You need a feed bog, throat plate, outside presser foot, inside presser foot and the needle holder with attached needle bar when needle holder and needle bar is 1 piece. Sometime needle bar and needle holder are split parts and you just need the needle holder - depends on what you have installed. When you changed the parts you have to adjust the 2 hook saddles and drive gears and adjust the needle and hook timing.

Is it helps - the 145w shares the gauge sets with the Seiko JW-28BL and probably other machines too. Not sure if the Adler 221 has the same gauge set s but I think so.

Hope this picture from an old Singer catalogue helps:

IMG_2847.JPG

Edited by Constabulary

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Adler 221 different Constabulary as you guessed.  Consew, Seiko same as Singer.   Adler 220 was similar.

glenn

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Hey Glenn,I hate to tell you but the Consew & Seiko feed dogs are different,Adler 220 & Juki 158 are the  the same as Singer.

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This is exactly the information I needed thanks to all of you. I really want to learn how to use the machine and get familiar with it how it is now with a clutch motor that it has. Do you guys think its going to be incredibly fast.

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4 hours ago, Leathermaker831 said:

This is exactly the information I needed thanks to all of you. I really want to learn how to use the machine and get familiar with it how it is now with a clutch motor that it has. Do you guys think its going to be incredibly fast.

Yes, and no. Depends on the condition of the motor and your ability to feather the treadle. Some people swear by them. I hated every clutch motor I ever owned. :)

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5 hours ago, Leathermaker831 said:

 Do you guys think its going to be incredibly fast.

In a word - yes!

It requires a bit of skill, and lots of practice, to learn to control one to get consistent low speed sewing. It didn't take me long to change to a servo!

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What do you guys think this sewing machine is worth once I dial it in

 

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Thanks Bob.  You know more about this machine than I do and I had a 144 short arm years ago and now own an Adler 220-50-73.  Sorry.

glenn

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